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Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education

2019

Kathryn Darras, MD FRCPC

PGY-7 Nuclear Medicine Residency Program, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
PhD Candidate, Medical Education, School of Health Professions Education, Maastricht University, Netherlands

Kathryn Darras, MD FRCPC
Kathryn Darras, MD FRCPC

Applied Anatomy: Impact of Virtual Dissection on Medical Student Competence in Clerkship

How this work will inform research in medical education: In medical undergraduate curricula, radiology instruction is typically integrated with cadaveric anatomy teaching and primarily involves the use of ultrasound and two-dimensional images. However, with recent advances in technology-enabled learning, three-dimensional visualization systems, such as anatomy visualization tables (AVTs), can be used to teach radiological anatomy through virtual dissection. In virtual dissection, patient computed tomography (CT) scans are loaded onto the near life-size AVTs and through powerful software interactions learners can work together to manipulate the data to virtually perform their dissection. Grounded in systems theory, this study will evaluate the impact of pre-clinical virtual dissection teaching on students’ anatomy, surgery and radiology competencies in clerkship. Through considering how multiple separate learning elements interact to form complex learning events in virtual dissection, we aim to better understand how to provide pre-clinical medical students with clinically relevant anatomy knowledge that will prepare them for clerkship and ultimately for clinical practice.

Tina Hsu, MD FRCPC ABIM

Medical Oncologist, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre
Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

Tina Hsu, MD FRCPC ABIM
Tina Hsu, MD FRCPC ABIM

Training Medical Oncologists to Care for the Aging Population

How this work will inform research in medical education: There has been a significant increase in the development and use of electronic learning resources. Electronic learning allows educators to reach a wider audience, which is particularly useful for teaching subjects in which there are either a relatively small number of experts in the field or limited expertise locally, such as geriatric oncology. Although oncology trainees report that geriatric oncology is important and additional training would be helpful, existing e-modules are rarely used by trainees. The reasons for the gap between trainees’ expressed attitudes about the importance of geriatric oncology training and their usage of available e-learning resources is unclear. This project seeks to identify facilitators and barriers to uptake of non-mandatory, electronically delivered geriatric oncology curricula. This work is important because development of electronic resources requires time and money so understanding factors that influence utilization of electronic resources is important. The results of this study may subsequently inform the development of strategies to promote uptake of non-mandatory electronic learning materials in other educational contexts.

Ariel Lefkowitz, MD, CM, FRCPC, MEd Candidate

Clinical Associate, General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Ariel Lefkowitz, MD, CM, FRCPC, MEd Candidate
Ariel Lefkowitz, MD, CM, FRCPC, MEd Candidate

Involving Patients in Narrative Medicine to Foster Critical Consciousness in Learners

How this work will inform research in medical education: Developing meaningful therapeutic relationships with patients based on mutual respect and understanding is the cornerstone of practicing good medicine, but it is difficult to construct educational curricula that promote these connections. By connecting with patients and learning about their lived experience, trainees and faculty can be stimulated to engage in critical consciousness, reflecting on their own biases and assumptions and challenging oppressive social structures that negatively impact person-centred care. This work aims to explore the theoretical grounding and implementation of collaborating with patients, families, and communities in the construction of medical narratives that will foster dialogue and critical consciousness. If successful, the resulting educational tools will encourage trainees and faculty to actively nurture equitable person-centred care in their medical practice and in systemic policy-making.

Fareen Zaver, MD FRCPC-EM, ABEM

Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary.

Fareen Zaver, MD FRCPC-EM, ABEM
Fareen Zaver, MD FRCPC-EM, ABEM

Challenges in the transition to independent practice

How this work will inform research in medical education: This work is important to medical education because it will address the extremely challenging transition from the final year of residency into the first few years of clinical practice. Despite the advent of CBME, new staff will continue to experience challenges in the initial years of practice across all specialties. There are a wide range of clinical, administrative and management issues not covered during training and can result in negative patient outcomes, low physician resiliency and high physician burnout.

2018

Lauren Gordon, MD, MSc (Computer Science), PhD Candidate

Resident physician, Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Toronto

Lauren Gordon, MD, MSc (Computer Science), PhD Candidate
Lauren Gordon, MD, MSc (Computer Science), PhD Candidate

Outcome-Based Competency Assessment in General and Vascular Surgery

“Surgery is inherently a high risk field, requiring a diverse skillset. As competency-based medical education is implemented in General and Vascular Surgery, it becomes increasingly important to determine what benchmarks to set to ensure competent surgical graduates. This work is important to medical education because it will help define the skills that make a competent surgeon. With the Operating Room Black Box (a recording platform being implemented in operating rooms worldwide) we have the unique opportunity to get insight into the technical skills demonstrated and their relationship to intraoperative events and patient outcomes. The results of this work will provide a foundation for evidence-based competency benchmarks as residency programs move toward implementing Competence by Design.”

Farhana Shariff, BSc, MDCM, FRCSC, MHPE Candidate

Clinical Educator Fellow, Division of General Surgery, Centre for Health Education Scholarship, University of British Columbia

Farhana Shariff, BSc, MDCM, FRCSC, MHPE Candidate
Farhana Shariff, BSc, MDCM, FRCSC, MHPE Candidate

Team training in the OR: A Pilot Project

“The operating room (OR) is a complex and dynamic environment with multiple team members, learners and leaders. Crises in the OR are stressful, high-stakes events that require efficient and coordinated team performance. While simulation is utilized in residency curricula, there is little opportunity for its use in interprofessional, multidisciplinary training and education. The influence of critical events checklists in the pediatric surgical setting, where events are infrequent and often present unique challenges, remains largely unexplored. An in-situ OR simulation training program provides a valuable opportunity to examine the effects of interprofessional education and crisis checklist implementation on both OR efficiency and team performance in managing critical events. Long term, this project aims to examine changes in team performance and patient outcomes in real-life critical OR situations in response to this intervention.”

Alexander Winkler-Schwartz, MDCM

Neurosurgical resident, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University

Alexander Winkler-Schwartz, MDCM
Alexander Winkler-Schwartz, MDCM

Does Neurosurgical Virtual Reality Training Improve Operative Performance?

“If successful, this will be the first time simulated operative rehearsal has been demonstrated to influence open surgical performance in Neurosurgery. This represents a crucial step in making simulators an integral part of residents’ technical skill development. Given the transition of surgical residencies to a competency-based curriculum, these findings may have wide-reaching implications in the education of future neurosurgeons. Standardizing surgical education and training has the potential to reduce operative complications, leading to decreased patient morbidity and mortality, and reduced medical care costs.”

2017

Marcio Gomes, MD, PhD (sciences), FRCPC, MHPE Candidate

Staff Pathologist, The Ottawa Hospital

Marcio Gomes, MD, PhD (sciences), FRCPC, MHPE Candidate
Marcio Gomes, MD, PhD (sciences), FRCPC, MHPE Candidate
Workplace Assessment of Pathology EPA's

How this work will inform research in medical education

“This work is important to medical education because pathology training in Canada and worldwide is lagging with regard to the introduction of competency-based medical education (CBME), and there are no specific workplace tools for assessing technical skills in pathology and laboratory medicine. Anatomical pathology has initiated the RCPSC Competence by Design (CBD) project in 2016 and CBME tools will be essential for the assessment of the pathology entrustable professional activities (EPAs). Although the final list of pathology EPAs has not yet been defined, some procedure-based routine pathology activities will be part of that list, including intra-operative consultations (aka frozen sections), gross examination and autopsies. Therefore, developing workplace-based assessment tools is a required step in this process. The idea of this study is to introduce assessment-for-learning tools in pathology training, and in particular to do so with regard to the assessment of intra-operative pathology.”

Jennifer Tam, BSc (Pharm), MD, FRCPC

Subspecialty Resident, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children

Jennifer Tam, BSc (Pharm), MD, FRCPC
Jennifer Tam, BSc (Pharm), MD, FRCPC
Clinical Competency Committees: Using Qualitative Methods to Explore What Works and Why

How this work will inform research in medical education

“A clinical competency committee (CCC) is a group tasked with assessing the progress of each resident in a residency program, with the goal that the resident will be able to practice independently upon program completion. While some programs have used a CCC for years, the formalization of CCCs as an accreditation requirement is relatively new. As such, the best way to run a CCC is unknown. The Paediatric Infectious Diseases training program in Toronto has had a CCC since 2008. This provides a valuable opportunity to examine a CCC in Canada using a method called “instrumental case study” to reveal what works, what does not work, and why. Healthcare is dependent on the people that deliver it, so ensuring the best care to patients starts with medical education. This study will help the Royal College and residency programs develop effective CCCs to guide the training of our future doctors.”

Claire Temple-Oberle, BA, MSc, MD, FRCSC, MMEd Candidate

Professor, Divisions of Plastic Surgery and Surgical Oncology, University of Calgary

Claire Temple-Oberle, BA, MSc, MD, FRCSC, MMEd Candidate
Claire Temple-Oberle, BA, MSc, MD, FRCSC, MMEd Candidate
A Curriculum for Microsurgical Skills

How this work will inform research in medical education


“The project entitled “A Curriculum for Microsurgical Skills” is important because microsurgery is the backbone of reconstructive plastic surgery. Present microcourses and workplace learning may not foster mastery learning nor provide an environment conducive to deliberate practice. Leveraging a new simulation centre at the University of Calgary, a revised curriculum has been developed using Kern’s 6 steps of curriculum development. Once evaluation closes the loop on curricular development, insights gained will provide measurable behaviours and assessment instruments that could underpin the move toward competency based surgical education in microsurgery.”

2016

Kathleen Huth, BASc, MD, FRCPC, MMSc-Medical Education Candidate

Kenneth Van Dewark, BMSc, MD, FRCP

Rene Wong, MD, MEd, PhD Candidate, FRCPC