CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Royal College CEO introduces CBD Community Touchpoint

Announcing the first issue of CBD Community Touchpoint, a regular publication which provides updates on Competence by Design (CBD). I invite you to read and share this publication with colleagues, staff and faculty, and use it as a starting point for discussions.


Competency-based medical education: not just for residents

Improving performance and bettering patient outcomes were top of mind as more than 100 individuals gathered at the Invitations Continuing Professional Development (CPD) CBD Summit in April in Ottawa.


Collaborating to draw the big picture: Discussions around competency-based CPD

To learn more about the discussions which took place at the CPD CBD Summit, take a look at the mind-maps generated by the conversations.

•  Benefits and goals of transitioning to a competency-based CPD model
•  The role for assessment within competency-based CPD model
•  The role for CanMEDS within a competency-based CPD model


Beginning the CBD Dialogue

As stewards of patient care and the healthcare system, you input, knowledge and guidance are essential as the Royal College moves forward with Competence by Design.


Competence by Design: from theory to implementation

The Royal College and its partners have worked collaboratively over the better part of a decade researching competency-based medical education and bringing the best of this learning to the development of Competence by Design.


CBD Tools and resources

Visit the Royal College's Tools and Resources library to find videos, articles, presentations and more, all designed to help you better understand and share information about CBD.


Share your experiences: Online Poll

Tell us your stories. What are you (or your organization) already doing to work within a CBME model?


Get Engaged and Involved: Video

Dr. Kenneth A. Harris, MD, FRCSC, Executive Director of Specialty Education at the Royal College encourages you to get involved and have your say in CBD implementation.


CBD Community Touchpoint – for printing



Vol. 1, No. 1 — June 2015


 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Royal College CEO introduces CBD Community Touchpoint

Dear colleagues,

Andrew Padmos, BA, MD, FRCPC, FACP, Chief Executive Officer

Competence by Design (CBD) is the Royal College’s initiative to transition medical education from a time-based model to a hybrid competency-based medical education (CBME) in order to improve patient care by enhancing physician training and lifelong learning.

Your feedback and guidance is important to the successful implementation of CBME practices throughout specialty training and lifelong learning.

Welcome to the first issue of CBD Community Touchpoint, a regular publication which provides updates on Competence by Design (CBD), the Royal College’s initiative to introduce CBME practices in Canada.

I invite you to read and share this publication with colleagues, staff and faculty, and use it as a starting point for discussions.

We want and need to hear from you. This is our opportunity to engage and help shape the future of medical education for residents and practising specialists together. Have your say and

If you have any questions or you would like to discuss any aspect of CBD, please contact me at cbd@royalcollege.ca.

Yours Sincerely,

Andrew Padmos, BA, MD, FRCPC, FACP
Chief Executive Officer

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Competency-based medical education: not just for residents

Improving performance and bettering patient outcomes were top of mind as more than 100 individuals gathered at the invitational Continuing Professional Development (CPD) CBD Summit in April in Ottawa.

Until recently, discussions about CBD have focused on how it pertains to resident training. At the inaugural Summit, discussions began to revolve around how it will affect practicing physicians. Over two days, CPD leaders, regulatory authority representatives, assessment experts and scholars from 56 organizations began to examine the purpose, advantages and challenges of transitioning to a competency-based CPD model.

We recently caught up with three Summit participants and asked them for their thoughts on competency-based CPD. Here’s what they had to say.

Q: What are the potential benefits of a competency-based approach to CPD?

Fleur-Ange Lefebvre, PhD, Executive Director and CEO, The Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada

“Medical regulatory authorities expect physicians to be competent in their practice. To do this, physicians must understand their patients and the communities they serve, identify the competencies they need to provide quality medical care, and determine their learning needs for maintaining or expanding on those competencies. A competency-based approach to CPD would focus physicians’ precious time on the learning activities relevant to their practice.”

Fleur-Ange Lefebvre, PhD, Executive Director and CEO, The Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada

“This model can provide clear guidance to Fellows on the core CanMEDS-based competencies that relate to their specialties. The model can help them plan their learning based on the scope of specialty practice outlined by the competencies, more clearly connect and align professional training in residency to professional practice, and assist CPD providers on the specific learning activities they offer to address core competencies in all specialties.”

Ivan Silver, MD, FRCPC, Vice President, CAMH Education and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto

Q: What two things should we keep in mind as we begin the transition to competency-based CPD?

“First, this is a multi-stakeholder enterprise that requires a broad and ongoing commitment from several organizations. Second, the Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada and its members support this direction and are pleased to see it evolving hand-in-hand with the development of the Physician Practice Improvement System.”

Fleur-Ange Lefebvre, PhD

F. Gigi Osler BScMed, FRCSC, Head, Section of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, St. Boniface Hospital and Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Manitoba

“Change is hard. As we transition to competency-based CPD, we need to practise frequent and open communication, discussion and consultation. These are vital to foster early engagement with Fellows. We also need to collaborate with each specialty, particularly with National Specialty Societies.”

F. Gigi Osler BScMed, FRCSC, Head, Section of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, St. Boniface Hospital and Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Manitoba

“First, Fellows will know very little about competency-based education and will require a graduated approach to learning about it. Second, National Specialty Societies will need to buy into this for the Royal College to be successful in moving to the new model. Providing resources to create competency descriptions for every specialty will be a major issue.”

Ivan Silver, MD, FRCPC

Q: What supports must the Royal College provide as we move towards competency-based CPD?

“It will be vital to have Royal College support throughout the entire process. Specialties and CPD Educators will need support to develop specialty-specific milestones, resources, assessment tools and faculty development.”

F. Gigi Osler BScMed, FRCSC

Ivan Silver, MD, FRCPC, Vice President, CAMH Education and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto

“There are a number of supports the Royal College can provide. Things like:

Ivan Silver, MD, FRCPC

Q: Any additional thoughts you’d like to share on competency-based CPD?

“Before approaching the CPD aspects of competency based education, the specialties will need to define the core competencies of their specialty. They may be getting a head start with all the work going on now with competency descriptions for all resident training programs. I suspect practitioners will come up with quite a different list than the resident training programs at universities. The Royal College will need to engage the Regional Advisory Committees (RACs) in this process. The CPD units in each medical school will be key players in being early adopters of competency based CPD on specific topics.”

Ivan Silver, MD, FRCPC

Next steps in the competency-based CPD discussion

Next steps in the competency-based CPD discussion

Building on momentum from the Summit, the Royal College will partner with Fellows, CPD experts, the medical education community and the National Specialty Societies to build the model for continuing professional development. We will collaborate to create a series of white papers that will further explore the issues surrounding competency-based CPD and provide recommendations for moving forward.

We recognize that the smooth transition to a competency-based CPD model will require careful consideration, coordination and cooperation. These white papers and recommendations will be shared with stakeholders as a means to seek further guidance and collaboration on a competency-based CPD model that will meet the needs of the public and of the profession.

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Collaborating to Draw the Big Picture: Discussions around Competency-Based CPD

To learn more about the discussions which took place at the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) CBD Summit, take a look at the mind-maps generated by the conversations (in English only).

Share your thoughts and suggestions by contacting cbd@royalcollege.ca

Benefits and goals of transitioning to a competency-based CPD model. The role for assessment within competency-based CPD model. The role for CanMEDS within a competency-based CPD model.

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Beginning the CBD dialogue

As stewards of patient care and the healthcare system, your input, knowledge and guidance are essential as the Royal College moves forward with Competence by Design (CBD).

Over the past year, we’ve reached out to a number of organizations and individuals to begin CBD discussions and better understand unique contexts, opportunities and challenges. Conversations have occurred with:

Over the past year, we’ve reached out to a number of organizations and individuals to begin CBD discussions and better understand unique contexts, opportunities and challenges.

Continuing the conversation

These conversations were just the beginning. Your needs and insights will shape the future of CBD. We want and need to hear from you.

Take a look at the list above. If you don’t see your organization/title (or even if you do) let us know how we can better foster two-way communication.

By working together, we can learn side-by-side and create a practical, usable system that addresses gaps in the education system while respecting and supporting your needs and resources.


To take part in the CBD conversation

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Competence by Design: from theory to implementation

The Royal College and its partners have worked collaboratively over the better part of a decade researching competency-based medical education (CBME) and bringing the best of this learning to the development of Competence by Design (CBD).

Since we officially launched CBD in 2013, we have continued to refine its associated projects with expert input from organizations and medical schools across the country. We have discussed the implications of CBD at conferences, solicited feedback from working groups and discussed fine details with medical school deans.

We have also reached far and wide for evidence and opinions about the best ways to improve the CanMEDS Framework within the new context of CBME and CBD. We will launch the final version of CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework in the fall.

Here are the details of a few significant landmarks since CBD launched in 2013, including a brief list of our next steps.

Working side by side with our partners, our initial efforts focus on residency education. The goal is to provide residents with a more robust and integrated education that will be clearer on impacts and assessment and help supervisors easily identify areas where learners may be struggling and respond accordingly.

At the end of the day, our motivation, as always, is on achieving the best possible patient care.

Here are the details of a few significant landmarks since CBD launched in 2013, including a brief list of our next steps.

March 2013

April 2013

June 2013, February 2014, April 2014, September 2014

  • 2005 CanMEDS Framework, 3 drafts of the updated CanMEDS 2015 Framework and 2 drafts of the new Milestones Guide released for national consultation via 4 national online surveys, 13 ePanels, 8 focus groups and requests for feedback. Over 1,500 responses received.

September 2013, October 2014

  • CBD and CanMEDS 2015 Town Hall sessions at the International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) in 2013 and 2014 provided answers to and gathered input from over 150 attendees.

December 2013

  • eDiploma, the first step towards creating MAINPORT ePortfolio, launched for pilot testing with Area of Focused Competence (AFC-Diploma) trainees in Transfusion Medicine.

March 2014

  • Senior executives began visiting medical schools to discuss CBD face-to-face with Deans, Program Directors, Program Administrators Residents and PGME offices.

September 2014

September-November 2014

November 2014

  • MAINPORT ePortfolio working groups launched to examine automation and data exchange standards, privacy and legal concerns, and systems integration issues.

December 2014

May 2015

  • Anesthesiology, Internal Medicine and Surgical Foundations began the iterative process of creating specialty-specific milestones, Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs), new training standards and assessment models with the Royal College.

Next steps

Working side by side with our partners, our initial efforts focus on residency education.

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

CBD tools and resources

Looking for material to help you better understand and share information about CBD?

Looking for material to help you better understand and share information about CBD?

Visit www.royalcollege.ca/cbd/resources and choose from our library of resources.

Find videos and articles that explain the context of CBD, important developments in recent years and how CBD will affect learners, educators and practicing physicians.

Use tools such as our Competence Continuum Diagram, digital presentations and fact sheets to share information.


Can’t find what you’re looking for? We want to hear from you

If our resources aren’t suitable for your situation, contact cbd@royalcollege.ca. We’ll work with you to assemble what you need.

Also, we’re eager to hear your questions and opinions. Email us with your opinions about CBD and how you think the Royal College is doing.

 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Share your experiences

Tell us your stories. What, specifically, are you (or your organization) already doing to work within a CBME model?

Many disciplines, schools, faculties, programs and physicians have new and innovative ideas in medical education and competency based training and assessment. The Royal College is interested in learning more from your experiences.

How would you reply to the following?

My organization has…

Tell us your stories. What, specifically, are you (or your organization) already doing to work within a CBME model?


 

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CBD Community Touchpoint: Improving patient care through a lifelong competency-based medical education (CBME) model

Get Engaged and Involved

Dr. Kenneth A. Harris, MD, FRCSC, Executive Director of Specialty Education at the Royal College encourages you to get involved and have your say in CBD implementation.

Share your input and let us know how we’re doing by emailing cbd@royalcollege.ca.

 

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