Dialogue

Vol. 15, No. 10 — October 2015
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College


THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Did you hear that? iPad-enabled diagnostic test means “intelligent triage”

Dr. Matthew Bromwich is the architect behind a diagnostic device that leverages iPad technology to test hearing using a unique game interface.


CHECK-UP: Dr. Josh Landy’s “Instagram for docs” hits half a million subscribers

When we last spoke with Dr. Landy, co-developer of the Figure 1 app, the photo-sharing platform had a modest, but growing, following.


How to get the most out of your CPD Educator

As Fellows participating in the MOC Program, CPD Educators are uniquely positioned to offer advice and support.


Help us communicate better. Fill out our survey by Oct. 30 for a chance to win

If you’ve ever grumbled about receiving yet another Royal College email, this is your chance to share your opinions.


Members in the news


In memoriam


PLUS, MORE NEWS

The professional impact of competency-based learning: Upcoming sessions

Vancouver- and Kitchener/Toronto-area Fellows & residents: register for sessions this November.


Nominate someone for Honorary Fellowship – commend the extraordinary!

A nomination is a way to pay tribute to someone whom you admire and respect.


[Q&A] Dr. Wong previews his new e-pub, which is already generating interest from hospitals, health regions and health authorities…

We recently sat down with Dr. Roger Wong to talk about his new e-publication.


[New video] Scenario development for team-based simulation

The newest video features Dr. Glenn Posner, medical director of the uOSSC.


Living Room Learning: Livestream ICRE 2015’s five plenary sessions

You’ll be able to livestream plenary sessions from the comfort of your home or office.


Competency-based medical education meets simulation (learn more!)

Participants can take part in CBME-related workshops at the 2015 Simulation Summit.


Get info right from the source with CBD Community Touchpoint

Want the latest information on Competence by Design? Subscribe today.


 

Top

Did you hear that? iPad-enabled diagnostic test means “intelligent triage”

Did you hear that? iPad-enabled diagnostic test means “intelligent triage”

“It basically started because we were struggling with doing hearing testing in remote places,” said Matthew Bromwich, MD, FRCSC, a pediatric surgeon at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and clinical investigator at the CHEO Research Institute. “I thought: why not transport the equipment and the expertise, rather than the people?”

Dr. Bromwich is the architect behind ShoeBOX Audiometry, a diagnostic device that leverages iPad technology to reliably test hearing using a unique game interface.

“I think what’s amazing about this is what I call ‘intelligent triage.’ Who do you send to the audiologist? Who do you send to see the ENT doctor?” he mused. “Lots of people who get referred have nothing wrong with them. Wouldn’t you rather spend our health care dollars on people who need it? It only makes sense, and this helps make sure that it happens.”

What’s in a name? The vision for this project was to pack all the necessary expertise and equipment into something no bigger than a shoebox, hence, ShoeBOX.


How ShoeBOX Audiometry assesses hearing: Distract, engage, measure

“If you’ve ever had a hearing test, you know you’re supposed to sit quietly and wait; but, telling kids to sit quietly and wait is the opposite of what they want to do. Even for adults, sitting quietly in a stressful environment is not ideally-suited.”

Dr. Bromwich and his team at Clearwater Clinical — a company he started 10 years ago to develop and translate low-cost, predominantly mobile, medical solutions or replacement technologies into practice — decided to “turn that all on its head” by making the hearing test a game that children (or adults) can interact with, distracting them from the actual test.

“We call it ‘interactive audiometry’ because nothing happens if you don’t do something. You have to touch the screen and move things around, and it plays different sounds in different ears… and as you do it, we learn things about your hearing.”

The test-application works in concert with audiometric headphones that are calibrated to health standards. Dr. Bromwich recognized that for the test to be useful, it has to be clinically-valid because the results are meant to be used to determine if someone needs surgery, to be equipped with hearing aids, etc.

He and his team went to great effort to create a methodology that would give them reliable diagnostic results, such as utilizing the iPad’s microphone to monitor background noise and frequency-specific information. The result is a negative predictive value of close to 100 per cent. The device has been approved as a diagnostic audiometer (Class II device) by Health Canada, as well as for use in the United States and in Europe.

“This is in no way a replacement for an audiologist, but an adjunct to them to sort of scale their skillset so that it’s available to more people,” he explained, adding that he someday hopes to see the test deployed in family doctors’ offices, drugstores, schools, long-term care facilities, workplaces, and even hearing clinics.

Why the iOS monopoly? When you introduce variability in the equipment, you risk diluting the test’s reliability. Only Apple makes iPads and the devices are almost identical; in contrast, Android devices come in a wide range - to test all of them would be timely and expensive. Dr. Bromwich: “Right now I could send you the headphones, without even sending you the iPad, because I already know that your iPad is the same as my iPad.”

Going global: ShoeBOX Audiometry makes hearing testing accessible

According to the 2011 landmark World report on disability (World Health Organization, World Bank) hearing impairment is among the most common disabilities in the world.

Dr. Bromwich was funded by Grand Challenges Canada to take ShoeBOX Audiometry to Uganda. With an average test time of five minutes, he and his team were able to check the hearing of close to 700 children in just nine days, identifying 104 with measurable hearing loss. They also deployed the test in Nunavut, where there’s a higher-than-the-national-average incidence of hearing loss. Their test helped identify children for follow-up care.

Dr. Bromwich and his team have received another grant to continue to develop ShoeBOX Audiometry for use in the Third World. They also have projects on the go in Africa, Northern Mongolia and the United States to see if the test can be administered to monitor the hearing of patients undergoing treatment for either HIV or Tuberculosis, since drugs in those categories are known to cause potential hearing loss. Chemotherapy drugs can also affect hearing. Dr. Bromwich shared a personal story of sanitizing the ShoeBOX equipment for use by a child in isolation at his hospital to test, and potentially save, his hearing during treatment.

A partnership with World Wide Hearing to do 10,000 hearing tests in Guatemala and Peru is also underway.

The future of hearing testing and hearing loss research

Dr. Matthew Bromwich



The future of hearing testing and hearing loss research

The use of ShoeBOX Audiometry is being explored to determine its potential for administering new kinds of tests or isolating hearing loss trends.

Dr. Bromwich shared that many hearing specialists are looking ahead to central auditory processing tests as the future of hearing-monitoring, rather than ShoeBOX’s niche of pure tone audiometry: it’s the difference between whether people can hear to how they hear. There are only a few labour-intensive tests for this and Dr. Bromwich believes ShoeBOX could someday be adapted to rapidly-deploy new methods for testing how people function within their environments.

Another benefit of ShoeBOX Audiometry is that it’s on a Wi-Fi-enabled platform. This means that test results can easily be compiled in a central database to facilitate comparative analysis.

“I like the phrase: Change happens when the desperately needed meets the suddenly possible. Suddenly we have the ability to pile mass quantities of data from all over the world to help analyze the sort of essential questions about hearing loss. That’s really exciting.”


PREVIEW OF DR. BROMWICH’S OTHER MOBILE PROJECTS

Dr. Bromwich and his team at Clearwater Clinical are working on a variety of other projects to take advantage of smartphone capabilities for health care use.

MODICA: Never mix family and clinical photos again!

Launched last month, MODICA is a HIPAA-compliant medical camera app and cloud storage service for iPhone that allows physicians to securely capture and manage medical photos and videos then share them with other members of the health care team for collaborating on patient care.

The modern video tower is an iPhone

ClearSCOPE is a portable endoscope adapter that presents a viable replacement technology for expensive video towers. The adaptor connects any smartphone directly to the endoscope so physicians can use the camera on their mobile device to take high-definition endoscopy photos or videos.

 

Top

CHECK-UP: Dr. Josh Landy’s “Instagram for docs” hits half a million subscribers

Nominate someone for Honorary Fellowship – commend the extraordinary!

Photo courtesy of Figure 1


When we spoke with Joshua Landy, MD, FRCPC, co-developer of the Figure 1 app, in June 2014, the photo-sharing platform for health care professionals had a modest, but growing, following. In just over a year, the number of subscribers to the app has grown 500 per cent to over half a million downloads with about 50,000 individuals who use it daily — a pretty sound feat for a company that just celebrated its second anniversary in May.

Some of this growth can likely be attributed to the app’s expanded availability in more than 100 countries, up from the half dozen or so countries that had access a year ago.

"The growth that Figure 1 has experienced this past year has been incredibly exciting,” Dr. Landy, shared.

“Health care professionals learning from each other in a global community, represents a meaningful chance to improve patient care all over the world. Our mission of democratizing the knowledge of health care means that a doctor in rural China can learn from a specialist in Ottawa — or vice versa. These exchanges of knowledge are helping teach practitioners everywhere how to recognize rare disease — expanding their differential diagnoses, and increasing their understanding of evidence-based therapies. While our cases have already been viewed 1 billion times, I'm looking forward to many more exciting things later this year."

The growth that Figure 1 has experienced this past year has been incredibly exciting,” Dr. Landy, shared.

Dr. Josh Landy (Photo courtesy of Figure 1; Credit: Maria Jose Govea)


Related:Fellow co-develops app best described as a “modern technological version of a teaching file” — enabling a much larger community of learners” (Dialogue, June 2014)

In the news: Like Instagram for doctors, Figure 1 app now has 500,000 users” (The Globe and Mail, September 2015)

 

Top

How to get the most out of your CPD Educator

How to get the most out of your CPD Educator

Do you have questions about the Royal College’s Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program? Do you need additional support in determining how to record your learning activities in your MAINPORT ePortfolio?

CPD Educators support Fellows in person, through email or by phone

Whether it’s helping you determine where your learning activities fit or how to efficiently navigate your MAINPORT ePortfolio, your CPD Educator can answer your questions and share practical tips.

As Fellows participating in the MOC Program, the CPD Educators are uniquely positioned to offer advice and support.

Click on your region to meet your CPD Educators and find out what they can do for you!

map of CPD educator regions in Canada Region 5 Region 5 Region 5 Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 3 Region 4

CPD Educator expertise can help you

 

Top

Help us communicate better. Fill out our survey by Oct. 30 for a chance to win

Help us communicate better. Fill out our survey by Oct. 30 for a chance to win

Dr. Padmos used his September CEO Message to introduce a new member survey focused on learning more about Fellows’ and Resident Affiliates’ Royal College communications preferences.

Members have until October 30, 2015, to participate.

Members who complete the survey will be eligible to enter a draw for one of 20 prizes of a $100 donation to the registered charity of their choice (Fellow prize) or one of 10 $100 gift cards (Resident prize).

Please fill out the survey that best corresponds to you:

For more information on the survey, please see the September 2015 CEO Message.

Questions/comments can be directed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

Top

Members in the news

Members in the news

Samina Ali, MDCM, FRCPC (Pediatrics, Pediatric Emergency Medicine) is the co-author of an opinion piece published in the Edmonton Journal about the importance of professionalism and humanisim in the effective practice of medicine. Dr. Ali is assistant dean of Professionalism at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry. Tom Rosenal, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Respirology) and Amanda Roze des Ordons, MD, FRCPC (Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine) also collaborated on the piece. Read:Opinion: Getting the diagnosis right isn’t enough.”

Paul Arnold, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry), the new director of the Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education and associate professor of Psychiatry at the University of Calgary, is urging parents to be vigilant about signs of mental health issues in their children. Read: Parents need to be alert for childhood mental illness, psychiatrist says.”

Jonathan Dreyer, MDCM, FRCPC (Emergency Medicine), research director and professor in the Division of Emergency Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, was quoted in a CBC News article about a new low-cost stethoscope that was created by a Palestinian-Canadian doctor and Dr. Dreyer believes rivals more expensive models. Read:Dr. Tarek Loubani uses 3D printer to overcome Gaza stethoscope shortage.”

Elaine Gilfoyle, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics, Critical Care Medicine) was featured in a Metro News article highlighting her belief that better team-based communication is the key to more positive outcomes for children undergoing cardiac arrest. Dr. Gilfoyle is a clinical assistant professor, Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, and pediatric intensivist at Alberta Children’s Hospital. Read:University of Calgary research shows children’s lives can be better saved through effective communication.”

Ivar Mendez, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery), head of surgery at the University of Saskatchewan and Saskatoon Health Region, is leading a team at the University of Saskatchewan in the study of the use of stem cells to treat Parkinson’s disease in partnership with a Boston-based centre affiliated with Harvard University. Read: U of S, Harvard team up for Parkinson’s treatment.

Julio Montaner, OC, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) is calling for federal party leaders to endorse global targets to fight AIDS, as reported by The Globe and Mail. Dr. Montaner is director of the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Read: B.C. doctor urges federal parties to back AIDS-treatment target.”

Paul O’Byrne, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Respirology) was inducted as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, a high honour in the health sciences community. Dr. O’Byrne is executive director of the Firestone Institute of Respiratory Health at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and chair of Medicine at the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University. Read: Dr. Paul O’Byrne inducted as Fellow of CAHS.”

Valerie Sim, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) is co-author of a study that suggests bile acids could help slow the progression of Prion disease, as reported by the Edmonton Journal. Dr. Sim is an assistant professor in the Division of Neurology at the University of Alberta. Dr. Sim was also quoted in an ABC News article, commenting on a study she was not involved in that claims to have found the cause of Multiple System Atophy. Read:Bile acids could be used to treat deadly prion disease” and “Cause of Mysterious, Fatal Brain Disease Linked to Mad Cow Disease-Like Proteins.”

Susan Waserman, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology and Allergy) commented in a CBC News article about the findings from a new report that found visits to the emergency room for anaphylaxis have significantly increased in the last seven years. Dr. Waserman is an allergist and clinical immunologist at Hamilton Health Sciences and director of the Adverse Reactions Clinic, Firestone Institute of Respiratory Health. Read:ER visits for anaphylactic reactions increase

Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

Top

In memoriam

In memoriam

Lloyd Sharp Allen, MDCM, FRCSC, died on August 8, 2015, in Wolfville, N.S., at age 92. Dr. Allen was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1954. He graduated from Dalhousie University with his medical degree in 1948. Well-respected and well-loved, he practised in Sydney, N.S., from 1955-1997. Read more about Dr. Allen »

Donald A. Brown, MD, FRCSC, died on July 27, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 83. Dr. Brown was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1964. He earned his medical degree from the University of Alberta in 1957. An advocate for quality care, he worked at Richmond General Hospital for many years until his retirement in 1997. Read more about Dr. Brown »

Gordon Thomas Dickinson, MD, FRCPC, died on August 4, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 82. Dr. Dickinson was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1975. For 10 years in the 1960s, he was an editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal where he helped fortify its scientific standards and increase its renown. Read more about Dr. Dickinson »

Lawrence Theodore Diduch, MD, FRCSC, died on August 5, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 85. Dr. Diduch was certified by the Royal College in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery in 1962. He earned his MD from the University of Alberta in 1956. Remembered as a “fine man and physician,” he was well-liked by colleagues and patients. Read more about Dr. Diduch »

Joseph Lawson Gilmour, MD, FRCSC, died on August 12, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C. at age 88. Dr. Gilmour was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1961. Dr. Gilmour earned his MD at the University of Toronto in 1954. Most of his surgical career was spent providing care to patients at St. Vincent’s & St. Paul’s hospitals. Read more about Dr. Gilmour »

David George Gray, MBChB, FRCPC, died on August 9, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Gray was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1966. Born and educated in Aberdeen, Scotland, Dr. Gray had a full career that spanned 50 years and included roles as Chief of Medical Staff and Head of Radiology at Queensway Carleton Hospital. Read more about Dr. Gray »

Frederick (Fred) Harris, MD, FRCPC, died on June 3, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Harris was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 1967. He earned his medical degree at the University of Toronto in 1952. He will be missed by his family and friends. Read more about Dr. Harris »

F. Alexander Herbert, MD, FRCPC, died on July 11, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 85. Dr. Herbert was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1960. He earned his medical degree from the University of Manitoba in 1955. A former chair of the Alberta Thoracic Society, he officially retired in 1995 as Emeritus Professor of Medicine at the University of Alberta.  Read more about Dr. Herbert »

David Lloyd George (Red) Howard, MD, FRCPC, died on August 19, 2015, in Victoria, B.C., at age 93. Dr. Howard was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1955. He was a graduate of the University of Toronto’s School of Medicine, Class of 1948. He will be remembered as one of Western Canada’s first Rheumatology specialists. Read more about Dr. Howard »

Leslie Paul Ivan, MD, FRCSC, died on July 20, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 95. Dr. Ivan was certified by the Royal College in Neurosurgery in 1960. He graduated from the Debrecan Medical University in 1944. He served on the Royal College’s Neurosurgery Examination Committee from 1982-1985. He was a Professor Emeritus of the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Ottawa and formerly chief of Neurosurgery at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario. Read more about Dr. Ivan »

Ronald James Knowles, MDCM, FRCPC, died on August 21, 2015, in Miramichi, N.S., at age 84. Dr. Knowles was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1966. He earned his medical degree at Dalhousie University in 1957. Among other accomplishments, he helped organize the diagnostic imaging department at the Miramichi Regional Hospital. Read more about Dr. Knowles »

Raynauld (Ray) Ko, MD, FRCPC, died on August 11, 2015, in Mississauga, Ont., at age 44. Dr. Ko was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 2002. Dr. Ko earned his MD in 1997 from McGill University. At the time of his death, he worked as an assistant professor of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto and as director of the Acute Pain Service, of Clinical Operations and of Quality Assurance at Toronto General Hospital. Read more about Dr. Ko »

Angus Carleton MacDonald, MD, FRCSC, died on August 10, 2015, in Baddeck, N.S., at age 79. Dr. MacDonald was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1971. He is a past recipient of the Samuel MacLaughlun and Dennis Fellowships and worked for many years at Dalhousie and the VGH, as well as consulted at the IWK, Camp Hill and Halifax Infirmary. Read more about Dr. MacDonald »

Alexander H. (Sandy) Macgregor, MD, FRCSC, died on August 27, 2015, in Kodak, Tenn., at age 87. Dr. Macgregor was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1962. He earned his medical degree from the University of Edinburgh in 1956 before moving to North America. He worked for many years as a professor in Ohio and Virginia, before his retirement. Read more about Dr. Macgregor »

Joseph Alastair (JA) Mackay, MD, FRCPC, died on August 14, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 94. Dr. Mackay was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1955. He earned his MD from the University of Alberta in 1948. He spent many years in operating rooms at the Misericordia Community Hospital, where he is remembered for his wonderful patient care and extensive knowledge and mentorship. Read more about Dr. Mackay »

Angus Baxter MacMillan, MDCM, FRCPC, died on August 8, 2015, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 84. Dr.  MacMillan was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1960. He was a professor of Pediatrics at McMaster University and former chief of Pediatrics at the McMaster Children’s Hospital and St. Joseph’s Hosptial. He served on the Royal College’s Pediatric Test Committee from 1990-2000. Read more about Dr. MacMillan »  [Extra: Hamilton Spectator article on Dr. MacMillan]

Ronald David Nixon, MDCM, FRCPC, died on August 26, 2015, in Port Coquitlam, B.C., at age 88. Dr. Nixon was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1955. He earned his medical degree from McGill University in 1950. In his memory, Dr. Nixon’s family is arranging for a plaque to be affixed to a bench in Como Lake Park where he used to love to walk. Read more about Dr. Nixon »

Shekar Puttaswamy, MD, FRCPC, died on July 26, 2015, near Seibert Lake, Alta., at age 44, in a single pilot crash. Dr. Puttaswamy was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 2008. Originally from India, he earned his medical degree from Mysore University in 1995 and later settled and become an active member of the Bonnyville, Alta., community where he worked as chief pathologist at Bonnyville Health Care Centre. Among other interests, he had a passion for hobby flying. Read more about Dr. Puttaswamy »

Roderick Clendenning Ross, MD, FRCPC, died on August 28, 2015, in Oshawa, Ont., at age 97. Dr. Ross was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 1950. He is a former pathologist in chief at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and was affectionately called “Rocket Rod” by his students at the University of Toronto. From 1974-1976, he served on the Royal College’s Anatomical Pathology Examination Committee. Read more about Dr. Ross »

Madhav K. Sas (Sahasrabuddhe), MBBS, FRCSC, died on August 24, 2015, in Battleford, Sask., at age 79. Dr. Sas was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1974. He earned his medical degree in 1961 from the University of Poona in India. After moving to Canada, he practised in Biggar, Sask., for several years before moving to North Battleford where he worked as a general surgeon at the Battlefords Union Hospital until his retirement. Read more about Dr. Sas »

Pulin Bihari Sasmal, MBBS, FRCPC, died on July 15, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 76. Dr. Sasmal was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1979. He received his medical degree from the University of Calcutta Medical College in 1964. From 1985-1986, he served as president of the Edmonton Bengali Association.

Douglas (“Dr. Doug”) Charles Simms, MDCM, FRCPC, died on August 5, 2015, in St. John’s, N.L., at age 95. Dr. Simms was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1952. After finishing his medical degree, he served overseas as a medical officer during World War II. Post-war, he practised Family Medicine and later Pediatrics at several hospitals in St. John’s. Read more about Dr. Simms »

Ronald Edward Stokes, MD, FRCPC, died on August 7, 2015, in Kingston, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Stokes was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1963. He graduated from the University of Toronto with his medical degree in 1951. He lived in Bracebridge, Ont., for many years, where he was a respected psychiatrist. Read more about Dr. Stokes »

Ingrida Zenta Strautmanis, MD, FRCPC, died on August 9, 2015, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 92. Dr. Stratmanis was certified by the Royal College in Therapeutic Radiology in 1961. She earned her medical degree in 1957 at the University of Manitoba. She is remembered for her dedication to the medical profession and her love of music.  Read more about Dr. Strautmanis »

Murray Cornwall Thompson, MD, FRCPC, died on July 21, 2015, in Collingwood, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Thompson was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1956. For 34 years, he practised Anesthesiology at the Scarborough General Hospital, including 12 years as chief of staff, before his retirement in 1990. Read more about Dr. Thompson »


Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

Top

The professional impact of competency-based learning: Upcoming sessions

The professional impact of competency-based learning: Upcoming sessions

Vancouver- and Kitchener/Toronto-area Fellows and residents, the Royal College invites you to register for separate educational sessions being held in early November.

Hosted by your Regional Advisory Committees, these sessions will bring local Fellows and residents together to discuss the challenges and opportunities for both groups in a new era of competency-based medical education.

At the evening sessions, you will also meet your local CPD Educator and learn how he or she can support you with your lifelong learning.

Vancouver educational session: Monday, November 2, 2015, 6:00 – 9:15 p.m.
For more information, visit the RAC 1 website. To register, click here.

Kitchener educational session: Thursday, November 5, 2015, 6:00 – 9:15 p.m.
For more information, visit the RAC 3 website. To register, click here.


Since the sessions will take place in Vancouver and Kitchener, registration is limited to Fellows and residents living in and around those cities (including Toronto for the Kitchener session). Please note that registration numbers are limited.

These events, which are offered to Royal College Fellows and residents at no cost, are accredited group learning activities (Section 1) and are eligible for credit under the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program.

About these sessions

Understand how competency-based learning may affect you professionally
The Royal College’s Deputy CEO, Ken Harris, MD, FRCSC, will share progress on the move toward competency-based medical education and how it may impact your continuing professional development (CPD). The vision for competency-based CPD is in the early stages — this is an opportunity to better understand it and to provide feedback.

Learn how your CPD Educator can support you
Do you have questions about the Royal College’s MOC Program? Do you need additional support in determining how to record your learning activities in your MAINPORT ePortfolio? CPD Educators Rod McFadyen, MD, FRCPC (Vancouver session) and Vinita Bindlish, MD, FRCSC (Kitchener session) will demonstrate how to enhance your lifelong learning and how to access CPD Educator support and resources.

 

Top

Nominate someone for Honorary Fellowship – commend the extraordinary!

Nominate someone for Honorary Fellowship – commend the extraordinary!

Honorary Fellowship is one of the most prestigious awards that the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada can bestow upon individuals who are ineligible for Royal College Fellowship. A nomination is a significant way to pay tribute to someone deserving whom you admire and respect.


Celebrate someone whose work is exceptional

Celebrate key health care leaders and innovators in Canada and abroad by nominating them for Honorary Fellowship. The deadline to submit a nomination is November 20, 2015.

Click here to nominate somebody for Honorary Fellowship.

Who are Royal College Honorary Fellows?

They are citizens of the world who have made truly outstanding impacts on Canadian or global health care systems. They are individuals whose work and achievements have touched and benefited thousands of people. They are professionals who have moved mountains in the pursuit of delivering excellence in both health care delivery and patient safety.

In short, they are extraordinary.

Past Honorary Fellows include


 

Top

[Q&A] Dr. Wong previews his new e-pub, which is already generating interest from hospitals, health regions and health authorities…

[Q&A] Dr. Wong previews his new e-pub, which is already generating interest from hospitals, health regions and health authorities…

Dr. Roger Wong


The writing of the soon-to-be-released e-publication, Teaching Quality Improvement in Residency Education, first began in the mid-2000s when author Roger Wong, MD, FRCPC, the then-associate program director of the University of British Columbia’s Internal Medicine program, started developing a curriculum to teach Quality Improvement (QI) to residents. Fast-forward 10 years and Dr. Wong is now sharing his award-winning ideas to help program directors across Canada teach and assess the new CanMEDS QI competencies, and support the implementation of Competence by Design.

We recently sat down with Dr. Wong, currently the postgraduate dean at UBC, to talk about his new e-publication and his upcoming session at ICRE 2015.

Briefly describe the e-publication (e-pub).

Teaching Quality Improvement in Residency Education is a very exciting project that I’ve been working on with the Royal College for the past number of years. It is an e-publication that outlines a curriculum to teach quality improvement to residents. This book will cover topics such as setting learning objectives, assessing competencies and curriculum evaluations at every level, from the fundamentals of QI to advanced QI.

Teaching Quality Improvement in Residency Education

When did this project begin?

A number of years ago, I was the associate program director for the Internal Medicine program at UBC and I noted there was clearly an appetite to develop a curriculum on teaching QI to our Internal Medicine residents; so I took on the project of developing the curriculum and I discovered there was very little that was written about it, in terms of how to teach QI effectively. While the evidence on QI itself is expanding, very little attention has been paid to the educational aspect of how to teach and do assessment on these competencies. So, that caught my interest in creating an innovative curriculum for UBC and I began focusing on developing a QI curriculum for residency education.

[The program developed by Dr. Wong was the recipient of the 2006 Royal College/AMS CanMEDS Research and Development Grant.]

With the grant, we developed the educational material, the curriculum and different tools, and we looked at this as a tool to help medical educators, in particular program directors and program developers.

What we developed was very popular and was shared nationally with other universities and faculties of medicine. The curriculum received a lot of interest and gained traction. My work in this area was also recognized nationally when I received the Royal College/AMS Donald R. Wilson Award in 2007.

And then I ran into Jason [Frank, Director, Specialty Education, Strategy, and Standards, Office of Specialty Education at the Royal College] and he said: ‘Why don’t you write a book about this?’

Obviously, I agreed and was delighted to work with the Royal College, who has been fantastic in terms of the different teams within the college who have been involved.

It was a lot of fun, but it was also a lot of work. We developed this e-pub over a number of years and are delighted to finally launch it in Vancouver.

Why did you decide to write this e-pub?

The reason is practical and straightforward; when I was a program director, it was a lot of work to develop this material and I just thought ‘why not try to make it easier for other program directors?’

So, in writing this e-pub, my aim has always been to provide others with a user-friendly approach to developing and implementing a feasible and relevant QI curriculum for residency teaching, and to come up with some assessment tools that accompany the curriculum.

Who is this e-pub intended for?

The target audience includes any individual who is involved in delivering medical education — specifically program directors, their associates and assistants who are dedicated to developing curriculum and assessment methods.

I would also include residents as our target audience because we’ve learned that in order for the curriculum to be successful and to be incorporated at a grassroots level, we need to get residents energized about the idea. I hope that through this e-book, residents will get a sense of how they can become the change catalysts in bringing this to their programs.

I am also delighted to learn that the book has generated a lot of interest and requests, even before it is published, from hospitals, health regions and health authorities that are interested in doing work with quality improvement and patient safety.

What do you hope readers get from this book?

I’m really excited because this e-pub represents state-of-the-art information about how to develop a teaching curriculum and assessment methodology for QI in a very contextual way. It is very much tailored to the Canadian-context and it makes reference to some of the resources that are available to Canadians. I hope that our readers will not only become interested in this resource, but will also use it in their residency education programs.

I would like our readers to understand that there is a user-friendly approach to developing and implementing a QI curriculum that is consistent with the new CanMEDS Framework.

To learn more about quality improvement and the ways you can develop and implement a QI curriculum, download a copy of Dr. Wong’s book, available soon on the Royal College website.


Attending ICRE 2015? Don’t miss Dr. Wong’s session, “Teaching Quality Improvement in Residency Education,” taking place on Friday, October 23 at 11:00 a.m. PDT. For more information, visit www.royalcollege.ca/icre.


Teaching Quality Improvement in Residency Education is just one of many faculty development and support tools that will be released at ICRE 2015 in Vancouver.

Visit the CanMEDS booth at ICRE to explore and engage with the following new resources for educators:

 

Top

[New video] Scenario development for team-based simulation

Watch “Scenario Development for Team Based Simulation by Dr. Glenn Posner

We’ve added a new video to our Simulation in Health Care Video Series that features experts discussing foundational principles in simulation-based education, assessment and research. This series is designed for clinical educators with an interest in simulation in health care.


Watch the next video in this series

The newest video features Glenn Posner, MDCM, FRCSC, medical director of the University of Ottawa Skills and Simulation Centre and associate professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa.

Short on time? Skip to the chapter that interests you, using the video navigation links in the video description.

Visit our video series’ webpage to watch more videos on debriefing, team training in simulation and assessment in competency-based medical education.


LAST CHANCE:
Simulation events and training in November


2015 Simulation Summit

Attend this year’s summit from November 25-26, 2015, at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alta. The conference promises a full and interactive program under the theme: “Fresh Tracks: breaking trail-from theory to practice.”

Simulation Educator Training (SET) course

Learn how to develop simulation curriculum and integrate it with other learning activities, and how to conduct evaluations, provide effective feedback and debriefing. The next course is November 22-24, 2015, in Calgary.

 

Top

Living Room Learning: Livestream ICRE 2015’s five plenary sessions!

Living Room Learning: Livestream ICRE 2015’s five plenary sessions!

Can’t attend the 2015 International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE)? This year, you’ll be able to livestream all five plenary sessions from the comfort of your home or office.

Tune in to all five sessions


“If we improved graduate medical education, how would we know?”

Tune in for ICRE’s opening plenary with Dr. David Asch.

October 22, at 4 p.m. PDT/
7 p.m. EDT/8 p.m. ADT

“Residency rediscovered”

Watch the panel discussion featuring speakers Drs. Esam Albanyan, Mike Donoff, Markku Nousiainen and Eric Warm.

October 23, at 8 a.m. PDT/
11 a.m. EDT/12 p.m. ADT

“CanMEDS 2015: A global perspective: A journey to a 21st century competency framework”

Don’t miss this anticipated session featuring Drs. Kelly Caverzagie, Fedde Scheele, Marie-Louise Stokes and Jason Frank

October 24, at 8 a.m. PDT/
11 a.m. EDT/ 12 p.m. ADT

“CBME: Pros and Cons…The heavyweight title fight”

Dr. Eric Holmboe and Dr. Mark Walton face off.

October 24, at 10 a.m. PDT/
1 p.m. EDT/ 2 p.m. ADT

“Rocking the boat and staying in it: How to be a great change agent”

Tune in for ICRE’s closing plenary featuring Dr. Helen Bevan and Captain John Cox.

October 24, at 4 p.m. PDT/
7 p.m. EDT/ 8 p.m. ADT


To watch: Visit the ICRE website a few minutes prior to the plenary session of your choice, and follow the prompts.

Can’t watch live? All webcasts will be made available on the ICRE YouTube channel, following the conference.


Miss the pre-registration deadline for ICRE 2015? Sign up onsite!

Online registration for ICRE 2015 is now closed, but onsite registration will be available in Vancouver.

Visit the registration desk at the Vancouver Convention Centre (1055 Canada Pl., Vancouver, BC) starting at 3 p.m. (PDT) on Tuesday, October 20, to register for ICRE and its sessions.

Visit the ICRE website to view the full program lineup.

Questions? Email icre@royalcollege.ca

 

Top

Competency-based medical education meets simulation (learn more!)

Competency-based medical education meets simulation (learn more!)

Competency-based medical education (CBME) is rapidly being integrated into curricula and various stages of training in programs around the world — and simulation programs/practice are no exception.

During the 2015 Simulation Summit this November 25-26, participants can take part in a number of CBME-related workshops:


Competency based medical education – using simulation to meet learners and societal needs

November 25, 13:00 – 14:30 (MDT)

During this session, health care professionals involved in the education of trainees will be given the opportunity to discuss the rationale for, and principles behind, CBME; outline key changes to the CanMEDS 2015 Framework; and identify opportunities to enhance learning of CanMEDS 2015 for physicians in practice.



You’ve implemented a competency-based curriculum…now what? An introduction to outcomes oriented program evaluation

November 26, 10:30 – 12:00 (MDT)

This practical session will teach participants how to describe fundamentals for outcomes-oriented program evaluation; and integrate, apply and articulate the features of logic models for guiding program evaluations for Competence by Design simulation programs.


Visit www.royalcollege.ca/simulationsummit/program to find out more about these and other exciting professional development workshops and sessions taking place in Banff this fall.

Missed the early bird deadline? Online pre-registration is still available!

The early bird deadline may have passed, but there’s still time to reserve your spot at the 2015 Simulation Summit! Online pre-registration is open until October 31.

Only onsite registration will be available after that date.

 

Top

Get info right from the source with CBD Community Touchpoint

Get info right from the source with CBD Community Touchpoint

Want the latest information on Competence by Design?

Find out what’s been done and what’s coming next by signing up for our new tri-annual e-newsletter: CBD Community Touchpoint.

The upcoming October issue will feature

Subscribe today and get the next issue sent right to your inbox later this month.


Have a question about CBD?

Check out our continuously-updated CBD Resources page for a variety of

 

Top