Dialogue

Vol. 15, No. 12 — December 2015
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College


THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Reimagining orthopedic care with mobile technology: Halifax-based surgeon is poised to shake up the system

“In a few years, we could be in a position to stratify patients immediately – probably even in the family doctor’s office – using objective criteria for priority, not just two-dimensional x-rays and patients’ own assessment of their pain.” — Dr. Michael Dunbar


Historic meeting cements collaboration in Indigenous Health

Last month, a group of 23 Indigenous health champions from across Canada met at the Royal College to set the stage for a national summit to redress the harmful legacy of Indigenous colonialism, racism and residential schools.


Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Program: Where activities fit, tips for reporting and whom to contact for help

The deadline to submit your 2015 continuing professional development activities is January 31, 2016. Unsure where your activities fit? Unsure how to document outcomes in MAINPORT ePortfolio?


Physician employment: New agreement on actions to address medical
workforce issues

The main objective of the 2015 National Physician Employment Summit was to undertake initial steps to develop a multi-stakeholder action plan to aid physician employment and health workforce planning in Canada.


Members in the news


In memoriam


PLUS, MORE NEWS

Earn MOC credits by reviewing top research, presenter & workshop slides
from ICRE

Fellows: continue your professional development by browsing select presentation materials, workshops and plenary sessions from this year’s International Conference on Residency Education — now online.


Grant & Fellowship recipients tackle research on handover communication, CPD, simulation, workplace teaching and more!

View project abstracts and learn more about how these projects may impact medical education.


What your colleagues are saying about CanMEDS 2015: Part 2 of 2

There were so many comments that we chose to carry the conversation over into a second issue.


Global health and humanitarian projects: Haiti, Senegal and Nepal

A few highlights from the Royal College’s international development projects.


Event recap: Highlights from the 2015 Simulation Summit

Couldn’t make it to Banff this year? Here’s what you missed.


Change management 101: Some principles to create a culture of simulation

Topic areas include: understanding stakeholders, setting institutional targets, understanding drivers….


2016 patient safety & QI workshop adds content on resource stewardship

The next ASPIRE workshop will be held May 10-13, 2016, and will feature updated content.


Save the date: 2016 Annual Meeting of the Members

The Annual Meeting of the Members will take place on February 18, 2016. Why attend?


 

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Reimagining orthopedic care with mobile technology: Halifax-based surgeon is poised to shake up the system

Reimagining orthopedic care with mobile technology: Halifax-based surgeon is poised to shake up the system

Imagine waiting years for a surgical consultation, only to find out that you never needed surgery in the first place.

Imagine having hip replacement surgery and travelling for hours to a follow-up appointment, only to be told in a matter of minutes that everything is fine.

Imagine if your smartphone could help prevent both of those situations.


Michael Dunbar, MD, FRCSC

Michael Dunbar, MD, FRCSC, an orthopedic surgeon at the QE II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax and director of Research for Orthopaedics at the Halifax Infirmary, is the co-creator of a gait monitoring system, part of a larger research project known as Mobility at Capital Health or “M@CH.” This system, still in development for broad use, leverages existing mobile technology to improve the surgical referral and care processes for better patient outcomes and reduced wait times.

“In a few years, we could be in a position to stratify patients immediately – probably even in the family doctor’s office – using objective criteria for priority, not just two-dimensional x-rays and patients’ own assessment of their pain.”


High ambitions for new application: faster and more effective care

Nova Scotians endure long wait times and travel great distances for specialist care. With an aging population, Dr. Dunbar expects to see an even higher influx of referrals for orthopedic services in the coming years. These pressures are forcing the province’s already-stretched health care system to find alternatives to traditional care pathways.

“I think we’re at a point now in Nova Scotia where we really don’t have another choice other than to do something radical to shake it up.”

Dr. Dunbar’s gait monitoring system is a grant-funded project with high hopes of facilitating

  1. the capture of baseline data on patients consulting for hip, knee and joint replacements;

  2. the determination and prioritization of patients that need surgery, based on that data;

  3. ongoing monitoring of patients at-a-distance to influence their exercise regimens or determine their need for face-to-face follow-up visits with their surgeons.

“We just submitted our first abstract to an international meeting and we’re starting to see the first validation of proof of concept of what we’re talking about,” said Dr. Dunbar, the inaugural QEII Foundation Endowed Chair in Arthroplasty Outcomes.


Evidence-base supports use of tool to effectively screen surgical candidates

Establishing a strong evidence-base is crucial to ensure this tool provides reliable measures. Research has already determined and measured normal gait parameters and the ways in which humans’ centre of mass displacement (the way we walk) is sensitive to pathology. Gait labs have provided reliable metrics for years; however they require technical workers and can take up to 1.5 hours to process one patient, making them impractical for running through every patient in need of a consult.

“We now feel very strongly that you can also gather some of these measures accurately with a smartphone because those devices’ accelerometers and gyroscopes are quite powerful,” said Dr. Dunbar, whose tool would help surgeons recommend patients who may not benefit from surgery (e.g. have a normal gait) for physiotherapy or better pain counselling.

“We haven’t really done anything ground-breaking; we’re just fine-tuning existing technology to be applied at different points in the care continuum,” he said.

Dr. Dunbar and his team just submitted an abstract for work they did that showed a strong correlation between the selection of patients for surgery via face-to-face assessments with a surgeon and patients selected for surgery by physiotherapists based on patient data from clinics and the gait laboratory.

“A gait lab gives you thousands of pieces of data; it may be that only eight are essential for making the decision about surgery and maybe five you can get on a smartphone,” said Dr. Dunbar. “The tool we have could have some of the experience and the value of an experienced surgeon programmed into it, in terms of the decision-making threshold.”

While he admits this wouldn’t be a perfect replacement, it would enable health workers to gather fulsome data on all consult patients.

“This is a renaissance,” he said. “A joint replacement is a four-dimensional operation but we assess it and book it based on a short-length two-dimensional film [patient x-ray]. I want to know the four-dimensional behaviour of the patient because that’s what they’re going to be doing after surgery. They’re going to be walking around with their new implant.”


Broad spectrum of the project looks at pre- and post-surgical care

 

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Historic meeting cements collaboration in Indigenous Health

Historic meeting cements collaboration in Indigenous Health

Last month, a group of 23 Indigenous health champions from across Canada met at the Royal College to set the stage for a national summit to redress the harmful legacy of Indigenous colonialism, racism and residential schools. The meeting also sealed a committed partnership amongst members of the Indigenous Health Alliance, newly-created after the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Calls to Action on Health.

The meeting was organized under the title, “Rethinking Collaboration in Indigenous Health,” and was led by Alika Lafontaine, MD, FRCPC, and Tom Dignan, MD, Ont, chair of the Royal College’s Indigenous Health Advisory Committee.

“It is rare that a Nation gets the chance to right a historical wrong,” said Dr. Alika Lafontaine.  “One of the reasons why we’ve struggled in Indigenous Health is we have not been able to acknowledge those wrongs openly – as a Nation – until recently. The Royal College decided years ago it would be committed to Truth and Reconciliation. Using its influence to convene this meeting and becoming a founding champion of the Indigenous Health Alliance is a manifestation of that commitment. There’s a lot of work to do moving forward, but I don’t think I’ve ever been more proud to be a Fellow of the Royal College.”


Broad representation in the Indigenous Health Alliance

The Indigenous Health Alliance represents a cross-section of organizations, including delegates from

There is every intention to expand membership in the Indigenous Health Alliance as commitments mature, roles become defined and gaps in expertise unfold.


Meeting achieved its four objectives

Dr. Lafontaine, recently appointed a Fellow-at-large on Royal College Council, led the roup in attendance using a structured process and workshop format.

The meeting had four objectives:

  1. Reach consensus on a proposed overarching project outcome: “To have health care stakeholders and Canadians recognize the difference in quality between the care that Canadian and Indigenous patients receive and to actively eliminate these differences.”

  2. Seek agreement on a 10-step project plan process.

  3. Develop a list of dedicated Indigenous Health Alliance participants who can commit to the project, including the value that each can bring to the process.

  4. Outline the next steps to invigorate collaboration and discuss key deliverables leading to a date for a pan-Canadian Indigenous health summit.

Participants agreed that the meeting achieved its goals, and were appreciative of the opportunity to express their view and outlooks, and to contribute to future planning.


Several meeting highlights


Next step: Drafting a Memorandum of Understanding

Dr. Lafontaine and his project management team will now draft a Memorandum of Understanding to establish an accord for the project that will constitute a collaboration deal between the project stakeholders. Fact sheets and term sheets, expected from each of the organizations in the alliance, will validate their respective contributions.

You can learn more about the Indigenous Health Alliance by visiting their website, www.indigenoushealthalliance.com

A follow-up meeting to prioritize actions is being planned.

Please send any comments or questions about this work to healthpolicy@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Maintenance of Certification: Where activities fit, tips for reporting and whom to contact for help


Maintenance of Certification: Where activities fit, tips for reporting and whom to contact for help

The deadline to submit your 2015 continuing professional development (CPD) activities is approaching on January 31, 2016.


Unsure where your CPD activities fit?

The Royal College’s Framework of Continuing Professional Development Activities comprises three sections: group learning, self-learning and assessment. Activities submitted via MAINPORT ePortfolio are converted automatically into credits.

If you’re unsure if your activity qualifies for Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credits, check out our summary table.

Summary of learning sections under the MOC Program framework »

If you’re still unsure where your activities fit, see if your question has already been answered in our list of frequently asked questions or contact us for personalized support.


How to document outcomes in MAINPORT ePortfolio

When entering activities in MAINPORT ePortfolio, you will be prompted to describe the outcome or impact of your learning for your professional practice (e.g. a description of the conclusions you reached after reflecting on the learning activity you completed).

Here are some examples:


Eight tips for successfully reporting MOC activities

We recently shared eight tips to help you get a head start on reporting your CPD activities, including bulk uploading your journal reading, making your teaching evaluations go further, taking advantage of the versatility of the Personal Learning Project option and back-reporting past activities that qualify for credits.

Get more details on these and four more practical tips in last month’s Dialogue:
www.royalcollege.ca/dialogue/vol15_11/moc


Have a question? We’re here to help

Fellows can contact the Royal College Services Centre for help documenting their 2015 CPD activities. The office is staffed Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. (Note: The Royal College will be closed from December 24, 2015, to January 1, 2016, inclusive).

Call 1-800-461-9598 (toll-free), 613-730-6243 (local) or email cpd@royalcollege.ca.


Fellows are also encouraged to contact their region’s CPD Educator. As Fellows themselves, CPD Educators are uniquely positioned to answer questions about how to use the MOC Program and MAINPORT ePortfolio.

Find contact details for a CPD educator in your region.

 

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Physician employment: New agreement on actions to address medical workforce issues

Physician employment: New agreement on actions to address medical workforce issues

Canadian health care leaders continue to seek solutions to align the medical workforce with current and future health needs of patients and communities.

Royal College President, Kevin Imrie, MD, FRCPC, FACP, opened last month’s National Physician Employment Summit calling on participants to end Canada’s physician workforce “boom and bust” cycle, which “has been detrimental to new physicians and, even more regrettably, at the expense of patients who need medical care.”

Summit participants rose to the challenge, proposing a variety of concrete actions to address medical workforce issues. Attendees emphasized the need to better understand the nature and shape of Canada’s existing health workforce, before taking action to adopt or advocate for necessary system-level changes.


Background

The Royal College has been actively studying specialist physician unemployment and underemployment for the past five years, and supporting national dialogue on this important issue among stakeholders in medicine, medical education, medical regulatory authorities and government. This work is part of a larger program of study looking at the specialty medical workforce more broadly.

The main objective of the 2015 National Physician Employment Summit, held November 5-6 in Ottawa, was to undertake initial steps to develop a multi-stakeholder action plan to aid physician employment and health workforce planning in Canada.

Meeting presentations detailed up-to-date physician employment data from Canada, health system and workforce trends, and how Canada’s health system compares with others.

Download presentation slides »


Action plan for the future

Participants discussed a variety of possible solutions and potential next steps during engaged table sessions. There was strong support for the creation of a time-limited initiative to study the nature and shape of Canada’s current health workforce, in order to better understand the current gaps and shortfalls. This initiative would include greater effort to learn from other comparator jurisdictions. While participants debated various mechanisms to advance this work, there was strong agreement on the urgency of the work.

Looking forward, the Royal College will work with Fellows to define its unique and collaborative role in responding to the calls for action heard at the employment summit. There were calls to show continued support for current physician resource planning efforts, with clear deliverables and timelines. Participants spoke of increased research funding for chronic health conditions. The Royal College was encouraged to work with specialty societies to define the needs of their disciplines and the patients they serve. The summit catalyzed diverse and constructive feedback that will guide the Royal College’s future work in this area.

For more information about this work, please visit the health policy section of our website or email healthpolicy@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Members in the news

Members in the news

Todd Mainprize, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery) recently made headlines, including on BBC News, for his role leading a novel clinical trial that safely breaks the blood-brain barrier of patients to more effectively deliver cancer-fighting drugs. Dr. Mainprize is a neurosurgeon at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. Read:Scientists breach brain barrier to treat sick patient.”

Raymond Lam, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) is a lead author on a new study that found extended benefits for the use of light therapy to treat depression, as reported by CBC News. Dr. Lam is a professor of Psychiatry and head of the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program in the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia (UBC) and director of the Mood Disorders Centre of Excellence at UBC Hospital. Read: “Light therapy could work for non-seasonal depression too, says study.

Lynora Saxinger, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) spoke with CBC News debunking recent advertising about the most effective way to ward off the flu. Dr. Saxinger is an associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Alberta. Read:Ads saying Cold-FX and flu shot work 'better together' questioned by experts.”

Tom Waddell, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery, Thoracic Surgery) and Mark Cattral, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery) both led teams that contributed to a successful single-operation multi-organ transplant (double lungs, liver and pancreas) for a Toronto teen living with cystic fibrosis that made headlines, like in CTV News. Dr. Waddell is head of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at University Health Network (UHN) Toronto and Dr. Cattral is director of Pancreas Transplantation at UHN. Director of the Toronto Lung Transplant Program, Shaf Keshavgee, MD, FRCPC (General Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery) was also quoted in the article. Read: Toronto teen with cystic fibrosis undergoes first-of-its-kind triple transplant.” 


F. Estelle R. Simons, MD, FRCPC, FCAHS, FRSC

Congratulations to Dr. Simons

F. Estelle R. Simons, MD, FRCPC, FCAHS, FRSC (Pediatrics) a professor in the Department of Pediatrics & Child Health at the University of Manitoba, was inducted as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (RSC) in November 2015, for advancing the specialty of Allergy and Clinical Immunology during more than four decades of leadership in research, education and patient care. Her research has focused on the clinical pharmacology of medications used in the treatment of allergic diseases. Fellowship in the RSC is Canada’s highest academic honour.


Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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In memoriam

In memoriam

Craig Rogers Arnold, MD, FRCPC, died on October 26, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 90. Dr. Arnold was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1955. He worked for many years at the Vancouver General Hospital and Shaughnessy Hospital and was a former registrar of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of B.C. Read more about Dr. Arnold »

Albert Reginald Cox, CM, MD, FRCPC, died on October 14, 2015, in Duncan, B.C., at age 87. Dr. Cox was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1959 and was formerly a Royal College examiner and member of Royal College Council (1986 to 1994). He played an important role in the development of Memorial University, where he served as dean of Medicine from 1974-1987. Read more about Dr. Cox »

Donald Melvin Cross, MD, FRCPC, died on October 13, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 89. Dr. Cross was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1960. Remembered for his positive attitude and for “bringing fresh perspective to life situations,” he will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Read more about Dr. Cross »

Dikran Artin Dikranian, MD, FRCPC, died on October 11, 2015, in Montreal, Que., at age 83. Dr. Dikranian was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1967. Born in Egypt, he earned his medical degree from Cairo University in 1957. Before his retirement in 2000, he ran a long-time clinic at Polyclinique Cabrini in St Leonard, Montreal. Read more about Dr. Dikranian »

Erwin Ludwig Fischer, MBBS, FRCPC, died on October 3, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 88. Dr. Fischer was certified by the Royal College in Community Medicine in 1979. He earned his medical degree from the University of Sydney in 1953. Outside of medicine he travelled extensively; he is remembered for his kind treatment of patients and staff, and impressive medical knowledge. Read more about Dr. Fischer »

Albert John Geeraert, MD, FRCSC, died on October 28, 2015, in St. Albert, Alta., at age 69. Dr. Geeraert was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery (1980) and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (1982). Remembered for his kindness and humility, until his retirement in 2007, he worked in private practice in Edmonton providing Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery. Read more about Dr. Geeraert »

John Leonard Goodwin, MD, FRCPC, of Charlottetown, P.E.I., died on October 5, 2015, in Castrojeriz, Spain, at age 60. Dr. Goodwin was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1988. His unexpected death occurred while he was walking the Camino Trail. He is remembered by family and friends for his warm and generous spirit, as well as his wit and passion for travel and family. Read more about Dr. Goodwin »

Basil John Steele Grogono, MD, FRCSC, died on October 12, 2015, in Halifax, N.S. at age 92. Dr. Grogono was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1960. He earned his medical degree from the University of London in 1945. He first worked in Winnipeg, Man., specializing in the rehabilitation of paraplegics, later working in Halifax, Yellowknife and Bermuda.  Read more about Dr. Grogono »

William Temple Hooper, MD, FRCPC, died on October 6, 2015, in Charlottetown, P.E.I., at age 95. Dr. Hooper was certified by the Royal College in Therapeutic Radiology in 1960. Outside of medicine, he had a fondness for golf and is remembered for his friendliness and for being “a perfect gentleman.” Read more about Dr. Hooper »

Swami Piyaru Seema Johri, MBBS, FRCSC, died on September 23, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 76. Dr. Johri was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1970. She earned her medical degree from Agra University in India in 1963. Upon her move to Canada, she practised in Kitchener, Ont. and Ottawa for more than 40 years. Read more about Dr. Johri »

Aldrich Aronson Martinez, MD, FRCSC, died on October 23, 2015, in Outremont, Que., at age 80. Dr. Martinez was certified by the Royal College in Urology in 1968. Dr. Martinez earned his medical degree from the University of Saragossa (Zaragoza) in Spain in 1959. He practised for many years at l’hôpital Santa Cabrini in Montreal. Read more about Dr. Martinez »

Avdesh Narain Mathur, MD, FRCSC, died on October 6, 2015, in Sudbury, Ont., at age 77. Dr. Mathur was certified by the Royal College in Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery in 1968. He earned his medical degree from Bihar University in India in 1960. Dr. Mathur worked as a cardiac surgeon at Sudbury Memorial Hospital and is renowned for having performed the first “beating heart off-pump coronary bypass surgery” in Canada. Read more about Dr. Mathur »

Edward J. G. Noble, MD, FRCPC, died on October 15, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 84. Dr. Noble was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1960. He worked as a long-time associate professor at the University of Toronto and also taught Cardiology at the Toronto General Hospital Division of the University Health Network for 35 years. Read more about Dr. Noble »

Sunil Praful Patel, MD, FRCPC, died on October 1, 2015, in Winnipeg, Man., at age 37. Dr. Patel was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine (2006) and Cardiology (2008). Remembered for his sharp mind, wit, generosity and professionalism; at the time of his death, Dr. Patel worked at Concordia Hospital and Concordia Health Associates. Read more about Dr. Patel »

Cesare Romagnoli, MD, FRCPC, died on October 26, 2015, in London, Ont., at age 59. Dr. Romagnoli was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 2009. He earned his medical degree from the University of Bologna in Italy in 1984. Remembered as a kind, humourous and approachable clinician, he previously worked at the Cape Breton Regional Hospital. Read more about Dr. Romagnoli »

John Trevor Malcolm Sandy, MD, FRCSC, died on October 15, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 87. Dr. Sandy was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1956. Until his retirement in 1993, he worked at the Vancouver General Hospital and over the years held a variety of surgical and medical administrative leadership positions. Read more about Dr. Sandy »

John Paul Schaefer, MD, FRCSC, died on October 2, 2015, in Summerside, P.E.I., at age 77. Dr. Schaefer was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1969. For more than 40 years, he practised at the Prince County Hospital in P.E.I. and also filled surgical locums in small communities in Baffin Island. He is remembered for his dedication to patients and quality care. Read more about Dr. Schaefer »

Herbert Clark Welch, MD, FRCPC,died on October 19, 2015, in Ladysmith, B.C., at age 90. Dr. Welch was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1958. He earned his medical degree from the Oregon Health & Science University in 1951. He is fondly remembered by family and friends and will be greatly missed. Read more about Dr. Welch »


Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Earn MOC credits by reviewing top research, presenter & workshop slides from ICRE 2015

Earn MOC credits by reviewing top research, presenter & workshop slides from ICRE 2015

Fellows can continue their professional development by browsing select presentation materials, workshops and plenary sessions from this year’s International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) — now available online.

Audio recordings, slides, videos and other resources from the October 22–24, 2015, conference can be used by Fellows as source materials for learning and credits towards their Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credit cycle.


Earn Section 2 credits

As outlined in Section 2 of the Framework of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Activities, learning activities such as reading a journal article, or listening to a podcast or audio recording can be used by a physician to enhance their awareness of new evidence or perspectives that are potentially relevant to their professional practice.

For example,

Browse the MOC Program framework of CPD activities to find out more about how participation in this web-based activity can translate into MOC credits.


Congratulations to all of ICRE 2015’s award winners

Every year, we’re fortunate to celebrate some of the most innovative thinking and trailblazing leadership in medical education with our annual ICRE awards. These awards recognize excellence in research, practice and training by residents, program directors, researchers and more.


2015 Residency Education Awards

Seven outstanding individuals were honoured for their contributions to specialty education on Saturday, October 24, during the Residency Education Awards Dinner.

Follow the links below to learn more about our inspiring winners.

2015 Kristin Sivertz Resident Leadership Award
Dr. Chelsea Maedler-Kron, McGill University
Dr. Hassan Mir, McMaster University

2015 Program Director of the Year Award
Dr. Mark Frank Levine, University of Toronto
Dr. Fraser Douglas Rubens, University of Ottawa

2015 International Resident Leadership Award
Dr. Deepa Shah, East Carolina University

2015 International Residency Educator of the Year Award
Dr. Neela Al Lamki, Oman Medical Specialty Board

2015 Program Administrator Award for Innovation and Excellence
Ms. Ginette Snook, The University of Ottawa Eye Institute


Top Paper and Poster Awards

Papers and posters submitted to ICRE provide a forum for those who use systematic, scholarly methods to evaluate educational programs, identify new phenomena, define aspects of training, and assess competence.

Last summer, nominees in each of the below categories were identified, and during ICRE 2015, winners were chosen after much deliberation:


JGME/Royal College Top Research in Residency Education Paper

JGME/Royal College Top Resident Paper

Top What Works Paper

Top Poster Presentation



Be a part of ICRE 2016 – Submit your workshop proposal today!

Want to be a part of our 2016 ICRE lineup?

Submit a workshop proposal today, and join medical educators and residency education leaders from around the world in Niagara Falls, Canada, September 29 – October 1, 2016!

Workshop submissions related to one (or more) of our 15 Learning Tracks will be considered for presentation. Preference will be given to those whose proposals directly address the conference theme, “Advancing Quality: Aligning Residency Education and Patient Care.”

Our call for submissions will remain open until January 29, 2016.

 

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Grant & Fellowship recipients tackle research on handover communication, CPD, simulation, workplace teaching and more!

Grant & Fellowship recipients tackle research on handover communication, CPD, simulation, workplace teaching and more!

Each year, the Royal College invests in exceptional Fellows and researchers through our competitive grant programs.  The programs support the conduct and development of education-focused research and the professional training of medical educators in Canada.

Please join us in congratulating the newest Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education and Research for Assessment within the context of Competency-based Education grants recipients.

Visit our website to view project abstracts and to learn more about how these research projects may impact the future of medical education (links are below).


2016 Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education recipients


Kathleen Huth, BASc, MD, FRCPC,
MMSc-Medical Education Candidate, Harvard Medical School

Kenneth Van Dewark, BMSc, MD,
PGY4, FRCP Emergency Medicine Program, McMaster University

Rene Wong, MD, MEd, PhD Candidate, FRCPC,
Assistant Professor, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Find more details about this year’s funded projects on our website »


2015 Research for Assessment within Competency-based Education grant recipients


Vincent W.S. Chan, MDCM, FRCPC, FRCA (UK),
Staff Anesthesiologist, Toronto Western Hospital

Carlos Gomez-Garibello, PhD,
Assistant Professor, Assessment and Evaluation Specialist, Postgraduate Medical Education (PGME), McGill University

Samantha Halman, MD, FRCPC, MMED,
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Ottawa

Find more details about this year’s funded projects on our website »

 

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What your colleagues are saying about CanMEDS 2015:
Part 2 of 2

2016 patient safety & QI workshop adds content on resource stewardship

For last month’s issue of Dialogue, we spoke to several of our partners and Fellows to gather their thoughts on the development of the revised and newly-launched CanMEDS Physician Competency Framework.  

There were so many interesting perspectives and comments about the new CanMEDS content and how additions to the Framework are helping to raise the bar for medical education and practice in Canada that we have chosen to carry the conversation over into a second issue. 

When the CanMEDS 2015 project started in 2012 one of the primary goals was to ensure that the revised Framework addressed important themes in health care and education that hadn’t featured prominently in the 2005 version of the Framework. 

To ensure the revised Framework focused on relevant and practical issues, CanMEDS development began with a literature review that looked at “New and Emerging Concepts as Related to the CanMEDS Roles.” Over the next three years, 13 Expert Working Groups, key partners and volunteers built on the findings of this review in a collaborative process that included four national online surveys, eight focus groups, 13 ePanels and over 600 hours of meetings and consultations.

The result is a Framework that integrates the following content across the CanMEDS Roles and truly reflects the abilities needed of the 21st century physician: 

Recent feedback on the revised Framework indicates overwhelming support for the new emphasis on these content areas. Our stakeholders, partners and Fellows tell us that these changes have helped “raise the bar” and strengthened the Framework overall.


More partner feedback

“The new CanMEDS Framework has incorporated the interprofessional and professional attitude-expectations of the public that have become defined much more clearly since CanMEDS was first introduced. Patients and other health care providers now have expectations that new physicians will be expected to meet, and without ongoing incorporation into residency training and assessment during that training, new specialists may not be adequately prepared… the new CanMEDS reflects our expectations of all practising physicians.”

William D. B. Pope, MD LL.B, FRCPC
Former Registrar and CEO,
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba



Thomas McLaughlin, MD, Resident Affiliate
President, Resident Doctors of Canada

 


Roger Wong, MD, FRCPC, FACP
Associate Dean, Postgraduate Medical Education University of British Columbia

 


Gordon Wallace, MD, CCFP(EM), FRCP
Managing Director, Safe Medical Care, The Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA)


CanMEDS and Competence by Design (CBD) Resources Available

To help you prepare for CBD and begin integrating the updated CanMEDS 2015 content into your programs, we’ve developed a number of tools and resources.

If the available material doesn’t meet your needs, let us know! Contact cbd@royalcollege.ca and we’ll work with you to assemble content that fits your context.

 

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Global health and humanitarian projects: Haiti, Senegal
and Nepal

Global health and humanitarian projects: Haiti, Senegal and Nepal

Royal College International (RCI) has had a busy year. Below are a few highlights from the Royal College’s international development projects — an important stream of RCI’s work.


Haiti

Led by Lucie Brazeau-Lamontagne, MD, FRCPC, several Royal College staff and volunteers returned to Haiti this September to continue our mission to strengthen internship leading to residency, establish academic partnerships with teaching hospitals and strengthen faculty development. Next steps include partnering with the Université de Sherbrooke and others to reinforce the internship year, and to seek funding to plan the pilot at the Université Quisqueya.


Senegal

The World Bank and Association of African Universities have selected the University of Dakar to house a Center of Excellence in Maternal and Child Health. Among the objectives of this centre is training a sufficient supply of quality health personnel who will contribute to improving the health of mothers and children. The university selected to work toward Royal College international accreditation. To begin this process, a first visit to begin consultations took place in November. 


Nepal

The Royal College continues to work with one of the largest teaching hospitals in Kathmandu, Nepal: the Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital. This hospital has strong and deep connections to Canada. The focus of our work for the past six months has been to partner with medical education and government leaders to set up a new system of medical education in Nepal to overcome years of insurgency, corruption and complications from the recent earthquakes. One of our first actions will be to create a coalition of Canadian organizations interested in improving the Nepalese health care sector or medical education system.


Did you miss the last CEO Message? Dr. Padmos provided his annual update to members on the Royal College’s work under International Outreach in his November 2015 message. Visit the CEO Message blog to read more about RCI’s activities from the past year.

 

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Event recap: Highlights from the 2015 Simulation Summit

Event recap: Highlights from the 2015 Simulation Summit

Simulation experts and enthusiasts from around the world gathered in Banff, Alta., on November 25-26, 2015, to investigate the latest advances in medical simulation and to collaborate with colleagues on health-related-simulation knowledge-translation.

The Royal College’s Simulation Summit is one of our most interprofessional events, hosting more than 300 delegates annually from a variety of different health professions. This year’s conference explored the theme: “Fresh Tracks: Breaking trail – from theory to practice.”


Couldn’t make it to Banff this year? Here’s what you missed

From interactive workshops and sessions to thought-provoking plenaries, exhibits and presentations, the 2015 Simulation Summit gave participants the valued opportunity to explore simulation-based medical education, research and practice.


SimTrek in the OR

Back by popular demand, the meeting once again featured its live simulation demonstration, SimTrek. For the first time, the event staged its crisis resource management scenario in the operating room (OR), rather than its traditional emergency room setting.

Led by Glenn Posner, MDCM, FRCSC, medical director of the University of Ottawa Skills and Simulation Centre, this year’s SimTrek focused on interprofessional, team-based communication around a pediatric surgical case; and featured the application of simulation principles, scenario debriefings and constructive feedback from a panel of medical experts.

“Since the beginning, the Simulation Summit has always been about interprofessional education, and SimTrek is really a culmination of a diversity of perspectives on the implementation of medical education-based practice,” said Dr. Posner.


Thought-provoking plenaries

From Professor Ian Curran’s inspiring opening plenary on disruptive innovation to Dr. Antoine Tesnière’s “outside the box” presentation that linked gaming and medical simulation innovation, delegates who took in this year’s outstanding lectures quickly took to social media to share their thoughts on the sessions:

Tweet by Doug Campbell

Tweet by Marcia Clark

Tweet by Sonia Sampson

Tweet by Walter Tavares

Want to see more tweets from the 2015 Simulation Summit? Browse the hashtag #SimBanff, or follow @RC_SimSummit to view retweets from the conference.


Simulation Summit Awards


2015 Simulation Summit Research Award

2015 Simulation Summit Best Presentation Award

Submissions in both award categories were judged based on originality, scientific merit, and their contribution to the field of simulation, by panels appointed by the Simulation Summit Planning Committee


Never miss an update: Sign-up for the Simulation Summit mailing list by emailing simsummit@royalcollege.ca and follow @RC_SimSummit on Twitter for more conference information and medical simulation news. 

 

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Change management 101: Some principles to create a culture
of simulation

Watch “Creating a culture of simulation by Dr. Robert J. Anderson, MD, FRCPC.

Watch the latest video in our Simulation in Health Care Video Series, featuring foundational principles in simulation-based education, assessment and research for educators with an interest in simulation in health care.

Our newest video features Robert J. Anderson, MD, FRCPC, medical lead for simulation at Health Sciences North and program director for Anesthesia at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

In just under 30 minutes, Dr. Anderson shares his experiences creating a culture for simulation with topic areas that include understanding stakeholders, setting institutional targets, understanding drivers, creating your educational team, engaging learners and more.

Watch “Creating a culture of simulation” [28.11 mins]


Short on time? Skip to the chapter that interests you, using the navigation links in the video description.


More video resources are available on our website

The next video, “Realism in Simulation” will be released on December 15 and will feature James L. Huffman, MD, FRCPC, an emergency physician and clinician educator from Calgary, Alta. Visit our video series’ webpage to watch it and more videos on debriefing, team training in simulation and assessment in competency-based medical education.

 

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2016 patient safety & QI workshop adds content on
resource stewardship

2016 patient safety & QI workshop adds content on resource stewardship

Over the past 10 years, patient safety and quality improvement (QI) have emerged as critical issues in health care. The Royal College has been a longtime advocate for patient safety and has shown this, in part, through its relationship with the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and their shared projects like ASPIRE: a national faculty development certificate program on patient safety for physicians.

ASPIRE (Advancing Safety for Patients in Residency Training) is an immersive four-day educational workshop intended for medical educators, physicians and residents that is dedicated to enhancing the capacity of institutions to provide patient safety training locally.

The next ASPIRE workshop will be held May 10-13, 2016, and will feature updated content.


Plan to attend the next ASPIRE workshop – updated with new content

There are two upcoming workshops planned (spring 2016 and fall 2017). Beginning in 2016, the ASPIRE curriculum will be updated to incorporate all of the important changes associated with CanMEDS 2015, including the concept of resource stewardship. By working closely with Choosing Wisely Canada, ASPIRE will now help physicians and patients make smart and effective resource choices to ensure high-quality care.

Register for the May 10-13, 2016, workshop.

For more information on ASPIRE, please contact aspire@royalcollege.ca or visit the ASPIRE website to get the latest updates.


Value of ASPIRE coaching: Successful French program held this November

The most recent ASPIRE workshop was held in Montreal from November 3-6, 2015, with generous support from the Collège des médecins du Québec. This was the third ASPIRE workshop since the program was launched in 2011, and the first one presented in French.

Led by Julien Poitras, MD, FRCPC, the workshop and simulation sessions were held at the modern facilities of the Centre d’apprentissage de l’Académie CHUM. The 40 participants attributed the success of the workshop to the exceptional speakers, the small group sessions that enabled them to work on their educational projects, the simulation session, the interactive components and the enthusiasm of participants and of presenters.

Feedback from participants at the fall 2015 ASPIRE

“Objectives addressed useful details, with some brainstorming moments; outstanding ASPIRE program overall.”

“Je repars avec une multitude d’idées pour mieux enseigner la sécurité des patients; merci pour ce magnifique programme.”

 

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Save the date: 2016 Annual Meeting of the Members

Save the date: 2016 Annual Meeting of the Members

The Royal College’s Annual Meeting of the Members will take place on Thursday, February 18, 2016, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. (EST) at the Royal College on 774 Echo Drive, Ottawa, Ontario.


Why attend?

The annual meeting provides Fellows with an opportunity to learn about Royal College activities and accomplishments, and to discuss matters of direct importance to the membership.


Agenda topics will include



Coming soon

Meeting materials and registration information will be available on our website,
www.royalcollege.ca/about/governance/amm, by January 20, 2016.

For more information, please email governance@royalcollege.ca.

Review the minutes of the February 20, 2015, Annual Meeting of the Members

 

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