Dialogue

Vol. 15, No. 6 — June 2015
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College


THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Why can’t we print skin? 3D print technology could transform burn care

Dr. Marc Jeschke, FRCSC, and an interdisciplinary team are advancing the prospect of using 3D printing technology to print skin that mimics the composition and properties of human skin.


Four areas to improve the quality of Palliative Medicine in Canada

The Royal College partnered to help present the National Palliative Medicine Survey, which gathered responses from more than 1000 doctors in Canada who provide palliative care services.


Where do I fit on the curve? Alberta program helps specialists find their place among peers — and may impact change

Read about the Alberta Physician Learning Program, which gives physicians the opportunity to better understand and contemplate changes to their practice through reflection on their own data.


Check out our monthly webinar series for answers to your CBD questions
(our next webinar is June 26)

Intended as engaging and informative sessions, we encourage all participants to provide input, ask questions and to share their experiences.


Members in the news


In memoriam



Other news bites

10,000 views & counting: Info videos on what specialists actually do, proving popular

To date, more than 10,000 viewers have watched one of the following fun, educational videos — have you?


It’s awards-and-grants season at the Royal College!

Time-limited opportunity: Apply for a grant, scholarship or fellowship, or celebrate a peer by nominating him or her for one of our prestigious awards.


New video series offers practical tips to get started in simulation-education

Less than 20 minutes in length, each video provides an in-depth overview of a specific topic, with a focus on solid and established educational and simulation principles.


Learn how to teach patient safety & QI (upcoming French workshop)

Book now to attend this special four-day workshop in November, designed to help educators teach and assess patient safety and quality improvement.



Conference news

CBME up for debate by MedEd heavyweights at ICRE 2015

Two medical experts are set to face-off at this year’s conference, to present the pros and cons of competency-based medical education. Find out more (you won’t want to miss it!)


Show off your research onscreen at the 2015 Simulation Summit!
(plus, more ways to get involved)

You’re invited to submit a video presentation to showcase your work at the 2015 Simulation Summit this fall in Banff! Plus, the call for abstracts closes at the end of the month and SimTrek opportunities…


 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Why can’t we print skin? 3D print technology could transform burn care

Creating “real skin”: A conundrum for burn experts

The burn community has been researching new processes to help burn patients for more than two decades, aided by technological discoveries. Nevertheless, developing a process to harvest cells that mimic all aspects of real skin, has proven a persistent challenge for skin tissue engineers and each advance has had its own limitations.

Dr. Jeschke cited an example of a lab in Boston that grows keratinocytes of the skins cells of patients, but whose end product lacks any structural components/dermis. With just the upper layer of the skin, the new skin easily sloughs, slides and is not cosmetically-pleasing. Others have attempted to use bovine collagens, stem cells or a host of other possible solutions, but none of these options have been clear successes or are being routinely used in clinical settings.

3D printing offers a real hope. Richard D’Aveni recently wrote in the Harvard Business Review (May 2015) that additive manufacturing is at the tipping point of becoming a mainstream process. Part of its draw is that each unit is freely created, making 3D printing primed for customization. This flexibility offers promising potential for a number of industries, including medicine and medical manufacturing.

The upper layer of skin is composed of keratinocytes that tightly adhere to each other. (Photo courtesy of the Sunnybrook Research Institute).

The upper layer of skin is composed of keratinocytes that tightly
adhere to each other.
(Photo courtesy of the Sunnybrook Research Institute).

An example of a patterned printed sheet made using the skin printer. (Photo courtesy of the Sunnybrook Research Institute).

An example of a patterned printed sheet made using the skin printer.
(Photo courtesy of the Sunnybrook Research Institute).

A severe burn is a life-altering event; burn experts know better than most that patients who survive the experience never quite return to their former way of life, even with so-called “new skin,” but an interdisciplinary team at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto are trying to change that.

Marc Jeschke, MD, FRCSC, is director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook and a senior scientist at the Sunnybrook Research Institute. For several years, he has been working in earnest to improve the current “gold standard” for burn care: the skin transplant.

He explained, “Right now, we take areas of the skin that are unburned, harvest the skin and then transplant it on the burned area. The problem with this approach is that when you use it to help patients with a significant burn [20 or more per cent of their body] you end up creating a wound almost equal the size of the burn in the process.”

But what if there was a way to forego the need for a donor site?

That is the hope of Dr. Jeschke and his team of research-colleagues, who are advancing the prospect of using 3D printing technology to print skin that mimics the composition and properties of human skin.

“If successful, this would be a major breakthrough that could be used not only for burns, but for any acute injury — all around the world.”

A complex passage to a clearly-defined goal

The project started five years ago when Dr. Jeschke was connected with Axel Guenther, PhD, an investigator, associate professor and scientific director of the Centre for Microfluidic Systems in Chemistry and Biology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Guenther had some 3D printing technology and together they devised the vision for their work.

“Why can’t we print skin?” said Dr. Jeschke. “But not only print skin, but make it functionally and aesthetically and systemically like your own skin.”

To do this, the team needed to analyze the components of human skin and then to create a computer program that would tell the printer how to print.

“It sounds simple, but it is actually quite complex,” assured Dr. Jeschke. “There are many aspects that have to be accounted for, such as what matrix do you use for printing? What’s your scaffolding? How do cells flow in there? What’s the composition of your skin and what is the composition of all the different cells?”

Dr. Jeschke and his colleagues do not employ stem cells; rather, they use differentiated cells made up of the four cell types that make up skin: fibroblasts, keratinocytes, melanocytes and sweat glands.

“That’s something that is novel because there have been products out there that have had keratinocytes and fibroblasts, but it was white; so, a patient with a different skin pigment would only have that one option. It also wouldn’t contain sweat glands, which is a problem for big burns,” he said.

The team’s measure of success is skin that mimics the coloration and functionality of real skin, which could have huge impacts on reducing scarring and the length of recovery.

“The printing speed is about 6 cm per minute, so you could theoretically print an entire body in a couple of hours if you had enough cells and materials.”

Project leads way to a valuable learning process

While the project is only in pre-clinical trials and could change significantly before it goes to clinical trial, Dr. Jeschke is passionate about the possibility of someday using this work to help people in Canada and in the developing world. Globally, burns routinely cause debilitating effects or death, in the absence of modern treatments.

The next several years will be telling about the feasibility of the vision, but for now Dr. Jeschke is encouraged by the learning process, even if it comprises many challenges.

“I think we have a strong interdisciplinary team and we have a great vision and goal. I don’t yet know if we’ll succeed, but already we’re learning a lot about things we never even considered because no one has ever tried this technique before.”

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Four areas to improve the quality of Palliative Medicine in Canada

Four areas to improve the quality of Palliative Medicine in Canada

Canada’s first national survey of physicians who deliver palliative care has unearthed several key ways to improve Canadians’ access to, and the quality of, palliative care services provided across Canada.

The National Palliative Medicine Survey was led by the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians in partnership with the Royal College, the Canadian Medical Association, the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network. Administered in late 2014, it gathered responses from 1,114 physicians nationwide who provide some level of palliative care.

Four key areas to improve Palliative Medicine in Canada

  1. Canada needs an adequate Palliative Medicine workforce. The vast majority (84 per cent) of physicians who provide Palliative Medicine services indicated that it is not their primary field of practice. All physicians providing palliative care services must be properly trained, assessed and supported to ensure they are capable of providing the highest standard of care.

  2. Palliative Medicine as a distinct discipline must be further developed to better meet the complex needs of patients. There must be emphasis on growing the discipline of Palliative Medicine, which needs to be valued by universities and medical schools with protected time and other requirements to foster academic growth and to improve how we take care of patients living with, and dying from, advanced and incurable conditions.

    While the Royal College officially recognized Palliative Medicine in 2013, recognizing the need to fill the gap for specialists who provide highly-specialized and complex palliative care, virtually every sub/specialist requires some knowledge and skills in treating patients who are reaching the end of life and dying of incurable illness — integral to generalism in every discipline.

  3. Primary care providers need more support for palliative care education and training. Education of primary care providers has been the focus of palliative care programs in the hope that many family physicians will provide the basic day-to-day symptom management required by patients.

  4. Canada must ensure minimum Palliative Medicine standards are met. National standards for training and practice, including guidance for interdisciplinary care, hours of coverage, etc., are needed.

The Royal College to continue its support of Palliative Medicine

Moving forward, the Royal College will continue to support research in Palliative Medicine and to enhance the role of Palliative Medicine in residency training and continuing professional development. Also, the Royal College will establish pan-Canadian standards for entry to practice for subspecialists who provide highly-specialized and complex palliative care.

This is the first comprehensive national survey for Palliative Medicine in Canada but it should not be the last. All Palliative Medicine researchers, health care leaders and policy-makers are encouraged to further explore, discuss and debate the findings of this survey.

For more information, please contact healthpolicy@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Where do I fit on the curve? Alberta program helps specialists find their place among peers — and may impact change

Alberta program helps specialists find their place among peers

“One way that physicians learn best is to look at their own data, relative to their peers, and then to consider the impact of that information on their own practice,” said Veronica Lawrence, a communications strategist and podcast technician with the Physician Learning Program - University of Calgary.

The Alberta Physician Learning Program was launched in 2009 to provide physicians and/or physician groups with an aggregate summary of their practice or behaviour in a certain action area, using data gathered from provincial administrative databases. A 2013 winner of a Royal College Accredited CPD Provider Innovation Award, the program also gives physicians the opportunity to receive a personalized, confidential report that reveals how they compare to their peers in relation to particular practice questions. This report gives physicians the opportunity to better understand their practice through reflection on their own data and to contemplate possible practice change.

Physician Learning Program is already prompting change

The Physician Learning Program serves Alberta’s physicians through offices at the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta, and is supported by the Alberta Medical Association, Alberta Health and Alberta Health Services. The team at the University of Calgary recently worked with close to 150 emergency doctors in the city, investigating the question: When a patient comes to Emergency with a bad infection, how quickly did the patient receive antibiotics?

To create the report, the team gathered complex performance data related to specific infections over a three year timeframe from the medical record systems of four major hospitals in Calgary, Alberta. More than 50 per cent of the physicians who participated requested confidential individual reports.

“The administration of the Emergency Department liked the report so much that they incorporated some of the data categories into their own regular evaluation of the doctors in their department,” explained Christopher Symonds, MD, FRCPC, a clinical associate professor of Medicine at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary and medical director of the Calgary office of the Physician Learning Program. “They say imitation is the highest form of flattery!”

Another example of the Physician Learning Program effecting change comes from the program’s Edmonton office where their Sentinel Node Biopsy project identified the need for mandatory coding of the procedure. This project was instrumental in initiating a province-wide change in the way the sentinel node biopsies are coded. Because of these changes, it is now possible to collect truly comparative data that can provide valuable information to physicians.

Program champions and broad interest made this project possible

The Physician Learning Program benefitted early-on from the support of Alberta’s physician-representative associations and program champions: Jocelyn Lockyer, PhD, senior associate dean, Education, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, and Chris de Gara, MD, FRCPC, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta. Together, Drs. Lockyer and de Gara recognized the potential value of database learning and helped launch this program while they were the respective associate deans of their universities’ Continuing Medical Education programs.

Dr. Symonds recognizes that other provinces have produced thoughtful and valuable research using similar data, adding credence to the assertion by Ms. Lawrence and Ms. Elaine Chow Baker, director of the Physician Learning Program - University of Calgary, that this program could be adapted and offered to physicians in other provinces (they are open to sharing their “lessons-learned” with anyone interested).

“Physicians are generally appreciative of the ability to view this data and to see where they fit and how their practice compares to other physicians. We’ve heard that some physicians found the data inspired them to think of other, larger practice-based questions,” said Ms. Lawrence.

Dr. Symonds added, “Doctors are interested in this; this is their own data.”

How the Alberta Physician Learning Program works (with real examples!)

“In the last two years, we’ve been able to deliver quite a number of projects to a wide variety of specialist groups, for example Psychiatry, Urology and Emergency Medicine,” said Dr. Symonds. The team at the universities of Calgary and Edmonton are currently working on an additional 24 projects.

Projects are initiated in one of two ways:

Learn more about the Alberta Physician Learning Program: www.albertaplp.ca.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Check out our monthly webinar series for answers to your CBD questions (our next webinar is June 26)

Our monthly webinars are unique opportunities for you to learn more about Competence by Design (CBD) — the Royal College’s initiative to introduce a competency-based medical education curriculum across Canada. Intended as engaging and informative sessions, we encourage all participants to provide input, ask questions and to share their experiences.


NEXT WEBINAR: JUNE 26, 2015. 'CBD and Workplace-Based Assessment in Residency'.

NEXT WEBINAR: JUNE 26, 2015

“CBD and Workplace-Based Assessment in Residency”

Presented by Farhan Bhanji, MD, FRCPC, and Mr. André St-Pierre

Register now  |  www.royalcollege.ca/cbd/consultations

This one hour session will introduce and explain the new vision of assessment with CBD, examine how assessment will occur using the to-be-developed MAINPORT ePortfolio, highlight potential changes to the timing of certification exams and discuss next steps. The session will also include time for questions and discussion.

Our webinars are aimed at all professionals in the medical field who will be impacted by Competence by Design and by CanMEDS 2015.


Earn MOC credits while learning about CBD and CanMEDS 2015 implementation

Earn MOC credits while learning about CBD and CanMEDS 2015 implementation

Learn more about CBD and CanMEDS 2015 through past presentations and recordings, now available on the CBD Resources page of the Royal College website: (scroll down to bottom of page) www.royalcollege.ca/cbd/resources.

Questions/comments

Send your questions to cbd@royalcollege.ca. Questions of broad interest or value could be answered in an upcoming issue of Dialogue.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College


Members in the news

Ben Alman, MD, FRCSC (Orthopedic Surgery) is part of a team of researchers at Toronto's The Hospital for Sick Children that have discovered a method to repair old bones at a quicker rate, as reported in Metro News. Dr. Alman is an adjunct scientist at the SickKids Research Institute and vice chair, Research, Department of Surgery, at the University of Toronto.

Glen Van Arsdell, MD, FRCSC (Cardiac Surgery) and Fraser Golding, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics, Cardiology) were highlighted in a Toronto Star feature for their work saving and caring for a 9-month-old with a deformed heart. Dr. Van Arsdell is head of Cardiovascular Surgery at The Hospital for Sick Children; Dr. Golding is a staff cardiologist.

Jenny Basran, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Geriatric Medicine) was named Saskatchewan’s “physician of the year” by the Saskatchewan Medical Association. Dr. Basran is an associate professor and head of the Division of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, as well as a geriatrician with the Saskatoon Health Region.

Anthony Bella, MD, FRCSC (Urology), a urological surgeon at The Ottawa Hospital, spoke to The Windsor Star about the lack of financial support from the province to assist men who could benefit from penile reconstruction following certain surgeries. Dean Elterman, MD, FRCSC (Urology), a staff urologist and medical director of the Prostate Cancer Rehabilitation Clinic at the University Health Network in Toronto, was also quoted.

Michael Fehlings, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery) was quoted in The Globe and Mail in regards to a new study that hints at possible advances in the treatment of patients with spinal cord damage. Dr. Fehlings is a senior scientist at the Toronto Western Research Institute, as well as director of the University of Toronto Neuroscience Program.

Anthony Feinstein, MBBCh, FRCPC (Psychiatry) will be participating in a yearlong series in The Globe and Mail titled “Conflict Photographers” — that will feature an interview each month between Dr. Feinstein and a photojournalist. Dr. Feinstein is an associate scientist at the Sunnybrook Research Institute in Toronto and a recognized expert on the psychological effects of war on frontline reporters.

Jean Chamberlain Froese, CM, MD, FRCSC (Obstetrics and Gynecology), a past Royal College Teasdale-Corti Humanitarian Award winner, recently received the Order of Canada. Dr. Chamberlain Froese is an associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., and founder and executive director of Save the Mothers International.

David Goldfarb, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases, and Medical Microbiology) helped develop a flocked swab that can act as a simple diagnostic tool that can be administered in-the-field to help speed the diagnosis of diarrhoeal disease. This research was reported by CBC News and The Toronto Star. Dr. Goldfarb is currently a professor at the University of British Columbia.

Kellie Leitch, MD, FRCSC (Orthopedic Surgery) was highlighted by CBC News for her efforts on-the-ground to help rehabilitate people in Nepal, following the country’s devastating earthquake. Dr. Leitch is Canada’s Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women, as well as an orthopedic surgeon.

Roger McIntyre, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) was quoted in a sponsored Financial Post feature about brain health. Dr. McIntyre is head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit for Toronto’s University Health Network and a professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto.

Ms. Eva Olsson, FRCPSC (Hon), a Holocaust survivor and Royal College Honorary Fellow, continues to inspire with her story — this time to a group of elementary students in Battlefords, Sask., as reported by The Battlefords News-Optimist.

Joel Paris, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) spoke to the Ottawa Citizen about the need for antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs to be carefully prescribed. Dr. Paris is a professor at McGill University and a research associate, Department of Psychiatry, at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal.

Wassim Saad, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine), academic director of postgraduate education at the University of Windsor, was featured in The Windsor Star for receiving a 2015 CAME certificate of merit award. Dr. Saad is the first physician from Windsor, Ont., to receive this award.

David Sackett, OC, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine), a Professor Emeritus at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., and so-called “father of evidence-based medicine,” was lauded worldwide. News of his death was covered in The New York Times and The Guardian, among other papers.

James Shapiro, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery) is part of a team at the University of Alberta that is paving a new way to help treat and manage Type 1 diabetes. Their project just reached a milestone, as reported by the Edmonton Journal. Dr. Shapiro is the director of the Clinical Islet Transplant Program in Edmonton.

Peter Silverstone, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) recently led a pilot project that had encouraging results in its efforts to alleviate incidents of anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts in teens, as reported in the Edmonton Journal. Dr. Silverstone is a professor at the University of Alberta in the Department of Psychiatry.

Charles Tator, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery), was featured in a Global News video speaking to the impact of head injuries on professional athletes. Dr. Tator is a neuroscientist and professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto.

Trevor Young, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) was named the new dean of Medicine at the University of Toronto. He spoke about his goals and priorities in this role in a Q&A with The Toronto Star.

Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College


In memoriam

Arthur Richard (Dick) Butson, MD, FRCSC, died on March 24, 2015, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 92. Dr. Butson was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1952. He was formerly the chief of General Surgery at St. Joseph’s Hospital and a commanding officer in the 23 Hamilton Medical Company (renamed 23 Field Ambulance). For committing a lifesaving rescue in 1947, he received the Albert Medal for gallantry from King George VI (later renamed and reinvested under the George Cross). Read more about Dr. Butson »

George Mark Cobb, MD, FRCSC, died on March 20, 2015, in Ajax, Ont., at age 83. Dr. Cobb was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1964. He was a highly-regarded ophthalmologist whose career encompassed work in Ontario, Newfoundland and New Brunswick. Regarded as a “genius” by some, outside of medicine, he was also passionate about sailing and woodworking. Read more about Dr. Cobb »

François Couture, MD, FRCPC, died on January 28, 2015, in Miami, USA, at age 79. Dr. Couture was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1963. A medical graduate of Laval University in 1959, he spent his 35-year career working at l’Hôpital du Saint-Sacrement de Québec. He is remembered both for his engaging personality and contagious humour, and his professionalism, empathy and knowledge. Read more about Dr. Couture »

Kenneth Irwin Dechert, MD, FRCSC, died on March 28, 2015, in Ancaster, Ont., at age 86. Dr. Dechert was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1967. He practised for many years as an obstetrician-gynecologist at the Juravinski (formerly, Henderson) Hospital in Hamilton, Ont. Dr. Dechert is equally-remembered for his talent as a musician (saxophone, organ). Read more about Dr. Dechert »

James (Jim, Hamish) Edward Dickie, MD, FRCPC, died on March 18, 2015, in Scarborough, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Dickie was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1970. He earned his medical degree at the University of Glasgow in 1958 and, after moving to Canada, practised radiology at the Scarborough General Hospital for many years before retiring in 2009. Read more about Dr. Dickie »

Claude Duquette, MD, FRCSC, died on March 26, 2015, in Quebec, Que., at age 75. Dr. Duquette was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1971. He graduated with his medical degree from Laval University in 1965 and practised for many years in Quebec. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Read more about Dr. Duquette »

Klaus Peter Fellenz, MD, FRCPC, died on February 20, 2015, in Summerland, B.C., at age 84. Dr. Fellenz was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1962. He earned his medical degree from the Philipp University of Marburg (University of Marburg) in Germany, and moved to Canada in 1959. He practised in Kamloops, B.C., for close to 50 years, and was an advocate for children’s health and wellbeing. Read more about Dr. Fellenz »

Lorne Renee Hatch, MD, FRCPC, died on February 24, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 75. Dr. Hatch was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1982. He graduated from the University of Alberta with his medical degree in 1965 and is remembered by colleagues for his medical knowledge and skills, as well as his calm and warm personality. Read more about Dr. Hatch »

Sigmund (Siggie) Hirsch Ein, MD, FRCSC, died on January 25, 2015, in Oshawa, Ont., at age 78. Dr. Ein was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery (1967) and Pediatric Surgery (1976). He worked for more than 20 years at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and is remembered as a skilled surgeon, caring doctor and mentor to colleagues. Dr. Ein is credited with saving the life/improving the life of countless patients. He volunteered on the Royal College’s Pediatric Surgery Committee from 1995 to 2003. Read more about Dr. Ein »

Henry Labrousse, MD, FRCPC, died on April 18, 2015, in Montreal, Que., at age 77. Dr. Labrousse was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1970. He earned his medical degree from the State University of Haiti in 1963 and remained active in the Canadian-Haitian community. Dr. Labrousse formerly worked for the Centre Hospitalier St-Vincent de Paul in Sherbrooke, Que. Read more about Dr. Labrousse »

Francis (Frank) Stephen Lynes, CD, MD, FRCSC, died on March 17, 2015, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 80. Dr. Lynes was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1963. He earned his medical degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1958, and served the Hamilton community for many years as an obstetrician-gynecologist at St. Joseph’s Hospital. Read more about Dr. Lynes »

Allison David (Dr. A.D.) Macdonald, MD, FRCPC, died on February 7, 2015, in Montreal, Que., at age 93. Dr. Macdonald was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1950. Before completing his medical studies, he served as a lieutenant in the Navy during World War II. Dr. Macdonald was a well-respected cardiologist who, among other roles, served on staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal. Read more about Dr. Macdonald »

Ronald William McCallum, MD, FRCPC, died on March 20, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 88. Dr. McCallum was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1970. A graduate of the University of Glasgow, he practised for 10 years in England before moving to Canada in 1966. Dr. McCallum was a Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, and was a recognized authority on urological radiology of the adult male lower urinary tract. He is credited for bringing the first MRI to St. Michael’s Hospital. Read more about Dr. McCallum »

James Floyd McMillan, MD, FRCSC, died on March 27, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 70. Dr. McMillan was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1975. He worked as an orthopedic surgeon for years at various hospitals, in and around Edmonton, and with the Worker’s Compensation Board. He will be remembered for his keen sense of humour, among other qualities. Read more about Dr. McMillan »

Denis McLean Riddell, MB, FRCSC, died on May 4, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 87. Dr. Riddell was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1965. He earned his medical degree from the University of London in 1950, and served with the British Army in Malaysia for two years before moving to Winnipeg in 1965. Dr. Riddell was a faculty member at the University of Manitoba and, from 1972-1976, was chief of staff at the Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, Winnipeg Unit. In 1977, he relocated to Kamloops, B.C., where he worked until his retirement in 1992. Read more about Dr. Riddell »

Stevens T. Norvell Jr., MD, FRCSC, died on February 7, 2015, in St. John’s, N.L., at age 91. Dr. Norvell was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1957. Born in Illinois, he moved to Canada in 1950 and worked as a family physician before training and working as a general surgeon. Dr. Norvell was a Professor Emeritus at Dalhousie University and is known for creating, and for 19 years editing, the Examination for Residents of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons. Read more about Dr. Norvell »

John O (Jack) Parker, MD, FRCPC, died on February 3, 2015, in Kingston, Ont., at age 84. Dr. Parker was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1959. For close to six decades, he served the Kingston community at Kingston General Hospital (KGH) and Queen’s University. His cardiovascular clinical care and research program was highly-respected, worldwide, and he is credited with introducing many key clinical services to KGH. Read more about Dr. Parker »

Stephen Harvey Rolbin, MD, FRCPC, died on May 6, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 68. Dr. Rolbin was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1976. He graduated with his medical degree from McGill University in 1971, and dedicated many years to work as a physician and mentor to medical trainees. He is remembered for his warmth, kindness, generosity and conscientious care. Read more about Dr. Rolbin »

Douglas Leonard Roy, MD, FRCPC, died on February 2, 2015, in Halifax, N.S., at age 91. Dr. Roy was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1952. He dedicated his career to advancing the treatment of children’s heart disease and is considered a pioneer of Pediatric Cardiology. For more than 40 years, Dr. Roy served as head of the Department of Cardiology at the IWK Hospital for Children (1952-1995). Read more about Dr. Roy »

David Lawrence Sackett, OC, MD, FRCPC, died on May 13, 2015, in Markdale, Ont., at age 80. Dr. Sackett was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1983. Known as “The father of evidence-based medicine,” he founded the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at McMaster University, where he was Professor Emeritus. Among his achievements, he received the Gairdner Wightman Award, was named an officer of the Order of Canada and was invested in the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. Dr. Sackett was a former member of the Royal College’s Health and Public Policy Task Force on Clinical Research (2000-2003) and Council (1988-1992). Read more about Dr. Sackett » (Plus, tributes: The Guardian, McMaster).

Terence (Terry) George Sparling, MD, FRCPC, died on April 4, 2015, in Victoria, B.C., at age 67. Dr. Sparling was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine (1977) and Hematology (1978). For many years he worked as a hematologist-oncologist, helping set up cancer programs in a variety of settings worldwide. Dr. Sparling will be remembered for his compassionate care, dedication, kindness and laughter. Read more about Dr. Sparling »

Melvin (Mel) Boris Wise, MD, FRCPC, died on February 4, 2015, in Montreal, Que., at age 85. Dr. Wise was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1959. He graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1954 and went on to teach and mentor many trainees and clinicians. He is remembered by former colleagues as an exceptional teacher, and intelligent and kind doctor, with a deep care for patients. Read more about Dr. Wise »

Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

10,000 views & counting: Info videos on what specialists actually do, proving popular

Thousands of patients from across Canada have watched the Royal College pilot video series aimed at enhancing understanding of what specialists actually do and why it matters to the health of Canadians.

Many Canadians know very little about what many specialists actually do, and the important role each specialty plays. Last month, the Royal College launched three pilot videos — General Surgery, Internal Medicine and Psychiatry — to fill this gap.

To date, more than 10,000 viewers have watched one of the following fun, educational videos — have you?

General Surgery


Internal Medicine


Psychiatry



Moving forward

Part of our ongoing public awareness campaign, these pilot videos will be evaluated to gauge effectiveness in educating Canadians about specialty medicine. If effective, future video series will promote awareness of the important roles played by the various other Royal College medical and surgical specialties and subspecialties.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

It’s awards-and-grants season at the Royal College!

Apply for a grant, scholarship or fellowship to advance your skills and competence, or celebrate a peer by nominating him or her for one of our prestigious awards.

Grants and Fellowships


More Royal College grants »


Personal achievement awards


More Royal College awards »


To apply for these and other exciting opportunities, visit www.royalcollege.ca/awards or email awards@royalcollege.ca. The deadline for all applications and nominations is September 11, 2015, at 4:00 p.m. EST.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

New video series offers practical tips to get started in simulation-education

We’ve launched a new Simulation in Health Care Video Series, featuring renowned simulation experts. These video-presentations reveal the foundational principles for simulation-based education, assessment and research, and are aimed at all clinical educators who are interested in simulation in health care.

Watch the first video in this series

Less than 20 minutes in length, each video provides an in-depth overview of a specific topic, with a focus on solid and established educational and simulation principles.

Watch the first video in this series: Debriefing in Healthcare Simulation: Basic Skills

Watch the first video now: Debriefing in Healthcare Simulation: Basic Skills

Additional videos will be released throughout the summer. Keep an eye on the Simulation in Health Care Video Series webpage for new videos and regular updates.

Attend Canada’s largest simulation education meeting: the Simulation Summit

From a plenary lineup featuring internationally-recognized experts to the return of the SimTrek session, this year’s Simulation Summit offers better value than ever before!

The 2015 Simulation Summit will take place from November 25-26, at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alta., under the theme “Fresh Tracks: breaking trail-from theory to practice.”

Get out your smartphones and save the date — registration for the Simulation Summit opens this summer. For more information, please visit: www.royalcollege.ca/simulationsummit


Get SET to integrate simulation into your curriculum!

Are you looking to become a better simulation educator? The Royal College can SET you on your way with its Simulation Educator Training (SET) course.

Delivered over three days in an interactive environment that combines instruction with hands-on training, this course covers

The Royal College is offering a SET course this fall, prior to the 2015 Simulation Summit:

Visit the PPI section of the Royal College website, for more information on this and other course offerings.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Learn how to teach patient safety & QI (upcoming French workshop)

Advancing Safety for Patients in Residency Education (ASPIRE)
Learn how to teach patient safety & QI (upcoming French workshop)

The Royal College, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Collège des médecins du Québec have partnered to offer a French ASPIRE program in Montreal on November 3-6, 2015 (rescheduled from June 2-5, 2015).

This four-day program will be held at the Centre d’apprentissage de l’Académie CHUM and will feature a state-of-the-art simulation session and stellar faculty. French medical educators (in medical, surgical or other health professions) interested in teaching and assessing patient safety and quality improvement (QI) are invited to attend.

Given that patient safety and QI competencies have been explicitly weaved throughout the new CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework, this program will enable participants to get a first-hand look at how these competencies can be taught and evaluated.

REGISTER by October 20, 2015  |  Spaces are limited

View the program (French only) »

Visit www.royalcollege.ca/events/aspire for more details.

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

CBME up for debate by MedEd heavyweights at ICRE 2015

Competency-based medical education (CBME) is gaining momentum around the world, as medical educators, physicians and policy-makers discuss its value for the future of medical education — do you know where you stand on this topic?

Attend CBME: Pro and Con (October 24, 2015) at this year’s International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) for a fun way to obtain a well-rounded perspective on this theme. This session will pit Eric Holmboe, MD, FACP, FRCP, versus Mark Walton, MD, in a toe-to-toe to debate on the pros and cons of the emerging competency-based medical education system — a system that involves implementing outcomes-driven education and assessment to ensure physicians possess the knowledge and abilities they need for every stage and role of their career.

This session will pit Eric Holmboe, MD, FACP, FRCP, versus Mark Walton, MD, in a toe-to-toe to debate on the pros and cons of the emerging competency-based medical education system

CBME: Pro and Con — the heavyweight title

In the red corner…

In the blue corner…

Reserve your place at the ringside! Registration for ICRE 2015 is now open, and early bird rates apply. Visit the ICRE website to complete registration or to learn more about conference programming.


Programming for all interests at ICRE 2015!

Programming for all interests at ICRE 2015!

This year’s conference will feature five provocative plenary sessions, featuring internationally-recognized experts; as well as 15 learning tracks; more than 50 workshops, and 200 poster and paper presentations; and the highly-anticipated official launch of the CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework and Milestones Guide.

Join more than 1,500 colleagues from around the world in Vancouver, from October 22-24, as this year’s conference focuses on the theme “Residency Rediscovered: Transforming Training for Modern Care”.

As a global forum for those involved in residency education to share ideas, challenges, innovations and advance training, ICRE 2015’s workshops, plenaries and sessions will touch on a wide range of pertinent topics, including

Register for ICRE 2015  |  Subscribe to the ICRE e-bulletin  |  Follow ICRE on Twitter

 

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Dialogue: Your link to the Royal College

Show off your research onscreen at the 2015 Simulation Summit!
(plus, more ways to get involved)

Video presentation topics

As a two-day conference open to all individuals engaged in the field of simulation, the 2015 Simulation Summit encourages video submissions on a wide range of topics:

Show off your research onscreen at the 2015 Simulation Summit!

Are you conducting interesting or groundbreaking work in your simulation centre that you think the world should see? Does your simulation research or practice lend itself to a dynamic, visual learning experience?

If so, you are invited to submit a video presentation to showcase your work at the 2015 Simulation Summit this fall in Banff, Alta.!

We are looking for submissions that are educational and that showcase simulation innovations in a creative or clever way, or that are based on a peculiar, unusual story.

Visit the Simulation Summit website for more information and video submission instructions. The deadline for video abstracts is August 24, 2015.

Selected videos will be made available to Simulation Summit participants through the conference app.

Don’t forget — the abstract submission deadline is June 24, 2015

Simulation researchers and educators are also invited to submit abstracts by June 24, 2015, for presentation and publication in the 2015 Simulation Summit program. Any scholarly topic related to simulation-based learning will be considered.

For full details, please review the 2015 Call for Abstracts.

Gather your team and show off your skills at SimTrek

Gather your team and show off your skills at SimTrek

The highly-popular, fun and interactive SimTrek session is returning for the 2015 Simulation Summit — and we’re looking for teams that have what it takes! Participating teams will have the opportunity to test their decision-making and communication skills and demonstrate their knowledge in front of an audience of peers, while gaining valuable feedback from a panel of expert assessors (and bragging rights, of course!)

We’re searching for two interprofessional quartets of health care providers to demonstrate management of a high-fidelity crisis management scenario. If you’re interested in taking part, please complete the SimTrek application form and submit it to simsummit@royalcollege.ca by June 24, 2015.

Can’t wait for the 2015 Simulation Summit? Join our Twitter scavenger hunt!

Can't wait for the 2015 Simulation Summit? Join our Twitter scavenger hunt!

If you’re eagerly anticipating the 2015 Simulation Summit, join the discussion on Twitter for updates on the conference and other simulation-related news — plus, a chance to win!

Whether you are interested in actively tweeting, or are just looking for the latest updates, follow @RC_SimSummit and use the hashtag #SimBanff leading up to, and during, the conference. As a bonus, 2015 conference attendees can also join our Twitter “Reach the Summit! A Scavenger Hunt for Simulation Summit Attendees” for a chance to win prizes. Find out how you can use the hashtag #SimBanffHunt to win!

Simulation Summit 2015

 

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