Dialogue

Vol. 15, No. 7 — July 2015
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College


THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


The need for speed: Fellow-led stroke trial proves clear mortality benefit

A 50% drop in patient death and a visible rise in positive outcomes are just two of the reasons people are talking about this new process to treat acute ischemic strokes. Find out what factors led to their success.


Fellows help refine the Royal College’s advocacy focus

Faced with evolving challenges facing the Canadian health system and a wide diversity of requests for support, we undertook an extensive investigation in early 2015 to answer three overarching questions.


Update from Royal College Council (June 2015)

The Council of the Royal College met on June 18-19, 2015, in Ottawa, for one and a half days of in-depth discussion and decision-making. Meeting highlights…


“Come on in!” Hundreds visit Royal College for Doors Open (photos)

The Royal College opened its doors to the public on Saturday, June 6, 2015, as part of Doors Open Ottawa. See photos from the event!


Members in the news


In memoriam



Other news bites

Building resiliency skills at the 2015 RAC Summit

The Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) Summit saw participants discuss Fellows’ concerns, issues and ideas for the future. Meet or contact your RAC chair. Also, have you heard of our PD grants yet?


Get CBD news delivered to your inbox: Find out what’s been done, what’s coming next…

We’ve launched a fresh newsletter that features the latest information on the progress of our Competence by Design initiative. Read the inaugural issue!


Make autumn a bit less hectic: apply for an award/grant this summer

A reminder to apply for a range of Royal College grants or to nominate a deserving colleague for one of our personal achievement awards, before September 11.


Interested in simulation-education? Learn more (with our video series)

Catch up with our first video or continue with part 2 in this new series. Plus, learn about more opportunities to learn about simulation in health care.



Conference news

Networking opportunities at ICRE/IRLS 2015

Check out our Top 5 “Can’t-miss” Networking Opportunities at this year’s events, from October 22-24, 2015, in Vancouver (note: they include social events and a mentorship program!)


Register for the 2015 Simulation Summit while early bird rates apply

Taking place Nov. 25-26, this year’s summit promises to deliver one of its most scenic (and exciting) years yet, with dynamic conference workshops, plenaries and interactive sessions.


 

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The need for speed: Fellow-led stroke trial proves clear mortality benefit

Dr. Hill, Dr. Goyal and Dr. Demchuk (from left) (Photos courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)

Dr. Hill, Dr. Goyal and Dr. Demchuk (from left)
(Photos courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)


A new stroke treatment led by Royal College Fellows has the potential to drastically improve the outcomes for thousands of Canadians who suffer from acute ischemic strokes each day. With clinical trial results that show a clear mortality benefit, some are heralding this work as the biggest breakthrough in acute stroke treatment in 20 years.

“The bottom line is that this is going to change the way that stroke is treated,” said Michael Hill, MD, FRCPC, director of the Stroke Unit for the Calgary Stroke Program, Alberta Health Services, and senior author of the study.


Validating a new way to manage acute strokes

Every nine minutes, someone in Canada has a stroke, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation’s 2015 Stroke Report. Upwards of 80 per cent of these strokes are ischemic: the result of clots that block the flow of blood to the brain. While many strides have been made in areas such as stroke prevention, arguably the last big finding in acute stroke treatment was in 1995 with the publication of findings that intravenous tPA is an effective treatment for stroke when administered within the first 4.5 hours of the onset of symptoms.

Within this context, it is easy to see why there is so much hype around the results of the recent Canadian-led international trial for acute stroke intervention directed by physicians at the University of Calgary’s Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Radiology at Foothills Medical Centre, Drs. Hill, Mayank Goyal, FRCPC, and Andrew Demchuk, FRCPC. Using a combination of quality imaging, parallel workflows, good decision-making, advances in thrombectomy and speediness, their trial saw a 50 per cent drop in patient death from major ischemic strokes (from two in 10 to one in 10 patients) and a rise in positive outcomes from 29 to 53 per cent, among trial participants who received both standard stroke care and endovascular treatment.


Technique paired with speed and ordered workflow

The ESCAPE trial (Endovascular treatment for Small Core and Anterior circulation Proximal occlusion with Emphasis on minimizing CT and recanalization times) set out to prove that swift endovascular revascularization of carefully selected patients with ischemic stroke can result in improved outcomes, compared to routine clinical treatment alone. Furthermore, endovascular treatment can be safely and quickly deployed in this patient population.

“I think everyone has believed for a long time that if you could return blood flow to the brain with the right kind of speed, then you would have a positive result,” said Dr. Hill. “It’s what biologically makes sense.”

The ESCAPE trial was conducted at 22 stroke centres: 11 in Canada and 11 international sites, including in the United States, Ireland and South Korea. Ambitious time targets of less than 60 minutes from CT to groin puncture and less than 90 minutes from CT to reperfusion were set and, remarkably, were met.

Of the 316 patients enrolled in the trial, 165 received medical treatment plus endovascular treatment. Fifty-three per cent of those patients had positive outcomes, compared to 29 per cent of the patients who did not receive the additional therapy. In addition, patients who received endovascular treatment had a decreased incidence of death (10 per cent) or disability (37 per cent) compared to those who only received medical treatment (19 and 52 per cent, respectively).

“Time is extremely important. If there is too much dead brain, opening the blood vessels will not have an effect on recovery,” said Dr. Goyal, co-principal investigator and lead interventional neuroradiologist for the ESCAPE trial.

(Photo courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)

(Photo courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)


Leveraging the work (and learnings) of others

Drs. Goyal, Demchuk and Hill were heavily involved in the IMS III trial — the unsuccessful conclusion to a series of endovascular trials whose results were published in early 2013 and included a time-to-perfusion estimate that was more than double the target met in ESCAPE (232 minutes versus 84 minutes).

Their insights into ways that the IMS III trial could be improved formed the basis of ESCAPE, whose success they attribute to three factors working in tandem:

  1. Effective use of fast, accurate and quality radiological imaging — the foundation upon which patients with ischemic stroke were selected for endovascular treatment (patients required the presence of good collaterals, as measured on multiphase CT angiography for stroke: a noninvasive method of imaging arteries in the brain).

  2. Quick action, strong decision-making and teamwork to swiftly process patients and apply treatment (including working in parallel, not in sequence).

  3. Use of modern technology to rapidly open up blocked arteries (e.g. the employment of stent retrievers).


Multiphase CT angiography confirms a good candidate for endovascular therapy, displaying occlusion of a large vessel and good collateral circulation (left), and the path to get there (right). (Photos courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)

Multiphase CT angiography confirms a good candidate for endovascular therapy,
displaying occlusion of a large vessel and good collateral circulation (left), and the path to get there (right).
(Photos courtesy of the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary)


“The cool thing is that there are five [trials] all at once that are all pointing in the same direction,” said Dr. Hill. “I think we are the only trial [thus far] to show a clear mortality benefit and those three factors were critical in the result that we achieved.”

Drs. Hill and Goyal hope to now expand on these results, and help introduce this treatment to more centres across Canada. They are also already looking ahead to more clinical trials.

“We have to recognize that 45 per cent of our patients did not get better: they were disabled or dead. So, there’s still a lot of work to do,” Dr. Hill summarized. “Some of those things will be system things, but there are also now opportunities to look at other treatments. We’re interested in doing more trials to see if we can understand those treatments, as well.”

Learn more about ESCAPE

Visit http://cumming.ucalgary.ca/escape-stroke to learn more. Medical professionals are encouraged to visit http://www.ucalgary.ca/dcns/ESCAPE for more detailed information including video resources; documents, manuscripts and papers; and clinical guidelines.

The trial results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine in March 2015: “Randomized Assessment of Rapid Endovascular Treatment of Ischemic Stroke.”

 

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Fellows help refine the Royal College’s advocacy focus

Fellows help refine the Royal College’s advocacy focus

The Royal College has a vital role to play in supporting specialty medicine and sound patient care in Canada — a view that was validated by more than 2,400 Fellows who responded to a recent Royal College advocacy survey.

It is important to carefully reflect and assess not only the issues we advocate for, but also how we go about doing it and how we are seen by Fellows, the public and government in our advocacy role. The survey revealed strong support for health advocacy focused on sharing key data and evidence, rather than entering political issues.


Did you know? Royal College bylaws instruct the organization to “contribute to the formulation of sound health and public policy” and its legal mandate requires it to “encourage, assist and promote the study of quantitative and qualitative aspects of specialized health care.”



Refining the advocacy focus

Faced with evolving challenges facing the Canadian health system and a wide diversity of requests for support, we undertook an extensive investigation in early 2015 to answer three overarching questions:

  1. What should the Royal College advocate about?

  2. What image should the Royal College portray in its advocacy role; how should it position itself?

  3. What process should the Royal College follow; how should it advocate?

To answer these questions, we consulted with three sister organizations, 50 Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) members, 14 National Specialty Societies and Fellows. All supported the organization’s role as advocates and leaders, and advised us to focus mostly on pan-Canadian issues. In general, they recommended that the Royal College adopt the stance of “expert” rather than that of “activist” in its advocacy.


Your views on our advocacy role

The opinion of Fellows was an important component to validate the Royal College’s future advocacy efforts. This is why we consulted you with an online survey in April 2015 that had more than 2,400 responses.

Among the findings,

Through the survey responses, Fellows sent a clear message that the Royal College has an important role to play in leveraging its expertise to support specialty medicine and sound patient care on key national educational, professional and public health issues. However, this advocacy should be built on trusted data and evidence, rather than entering political debates.

Check out the June CEO Message to see a table ranking survey responses on what image the Royal College should portray in its advocacy role.


Royal College advocacy guidebook

An advocacy guidebook will be presented to Council in October, providing an effective roadmap for the coming years. Contact healthpolicy@royalcollege.ca if you’d like to know more.

 

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Update from Royal College Council (June 2015)

Update from Royal College Council (June 2015)

The Council of the Royal College met on June 18-19, 2015, in Ottawa, for one and a half days of in-depth discussion and decision-making. Meet your Council members »


Meeting highlights


New Council member orientation

The June meeting was the first official meeting of nine new Council members, whose Council terms began following the Annual Meeting of the Members on February 20, 2015. To prepare them for their roles, an in-person orientation session with an accompanying Council orientation guide was prepared and delivered to new Councillors on June 17, at the Royal College. The half-day session was jointly delivered by the President, Kevin Imrie, MD, FRCPC, and CEO, Andrew Padmos, MD, FRCPC, as well as members of senior management. The session and materials were positively reviewed. Feedback from participants will be used to refine the Council orientation framework for future years.

Future advocacy role of the Royal College

In October 2014, Council confirmed the need to define an appropriate advocacy role for the Royal College that is consistent with its mandate as well as its image as the voice of specialty medicine in Canada. In that vein, a series of consultations and fact finding initiatives with Royal College Fellows and sister organizations were carried out. An interim report was prepared based on the data collected and was provided to Council at its June meeting.

Based on their review of the interim report, Councillors took part in a breakout session centred on the types of “real life” advocacy scenarios the Royal College encounters. Discussion of these scenarios provided critical input from Councillors on the approach, tone and content of the Royal College’s future advocacy activities. In particular, Council members shared their views on the need for the Royal College to function firstly as a knowledge expert and to be heard on matters where specialty medicine serves patients and populations. The feedback from Council will be integrated into the work completed to date. A final proposal for the Royal College’s future advocacy model, including details about the business approach, will be presented to Council for approval in October 2015.

Learn more: “Fellows help refine the Royal College’s advocacy focus.”

Open letter on Early Brain and Biological Development and Early Learning

Council approved sending an open letter to political party leaders, to raise awareness of the Royal College Position Statement on Early Childhood Development. The position statement recognizes that early childhood development interventions yield benefits throughout life that are worth many times their original investment. As the October 2015 federal election approaches, the Health and Public Policy Committee highlighted for Council that this was a unique opportunity to inform all federal party leaders of the importance of investment in early brain and biological development and early learning.

The open letter, approved by Council, was sent on June 26, 2015, to federal party leaders and also shared with the media. The letter will be sent to all provincial and territorial party leaders in the next few weeks. The letter can also be accessed on the Royal College’s website.

Refreshed CanMEDS 2015 Diagram

The CanMEDS Diagram is considered by many to be a global symbol of the CanMEDS Framework. In conjunction with the recent updates to the CanMEDS Framework, the desire also emerged to refresh the diagram. Accordingly, the Royal College undertook a series of consultations and focus groups with stakeholders, Fellows and other key audiences to provide them with the opportunity to influence the selection of a new design concept. At its June meeting, Council endorsed a refreshed design with some minor, suggested refinements. The final diagram will be unveiled at the CanMEDS 2015 Framework launch at the International Conference on Residency Education, this October 22-24, in Vancouver.

Learn more: “The CanMEDS 2015 Diagram: Tweak or overhaul?”

International outreach

The chair of the Board of Royal College International (RCI) briefed Council on RCI’s significant progress as a startup in the international domain. RCI is expected to come close to meeting several of its multi-year strategic targets, which were first established last July. The board is currently overseeing an exercise to recalibrate several of its targets to take into account lessons-learned and refined operating practices. The Council of the Royal College will have an opportunity to provide input on the refreshed multi-year business and financial support plans of RCI at a future meeting. Those plans are scheduled to be put before the RCI Board for consideration at their November 26, 2015, meeting.

Financial stewardship

Council was briefed on the financial position of the Royal College and Royal College International for the fourth quarter, which ended March 31, 2015. The audited financial statements for both corporate entities are in development and will be presented to Royal College Council and the Board of RCI, respectively, for approval in September 2015. The audited financial statements for the Royal College’s Employees’ Retirement Plan for the year ended December 31, 2014, were approved by Council at its June meeting.

In addition, Council also approved the terms of reference for a new Financial Review and Risk Oversight Committee (FRROC). This new committee will replace the previous Corporate Affairs Committee and Financial Review and Risk Oversight Committee, each of which will be dissolved to allow for the creation of the new committee. These actions will reduce the overlap of roles, improve efficiency and align the Royal College with best practices. The membership of the new FRROC will be established by Council at its October 2015 meeting.


The next meeting of Royal College Council will take place October 15-16, 2015, in Ottawa. Questions about Council activities can be directed to governance@royalcollege.ca

 

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“Come on in!” Hundreds visit Royal College for Doors Open (photos)

The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

The Royal College opened its doors to the public on Saturday, June 6, 2015, as part of Doors Open Ottawa. More than 120 buildings participated this year, offering visitors the chance to see inside some of the city’s most historic buildings and noteworthy sites.

Visitors to the Royal College were provided with guided tours of our building’s main and second floors, including access to the Council room to see the beautiful stained glass windows, and a look at our Roddick Room Library collection, and architectural features of the atrium.

Keep reading to see photos from the event.

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Housed in a former monastery overlooking the Rideau Canal, this classically inspired building is a major architectural landmark. Like other religious houses across Canada, it is organized around a central axis with wings housing various functions. Designed by Canadian born architect Alphonse Contant, the exterior is pale yellow brick with simple architectural details, including the tall central belfry, visible several blocks away. (Description from City of Ottawa website)


We opened our beautiful building for Doors Open Ottawa on June 6, 2015, educating the public about our mandate, history and heritage

Posted by Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada on Monday, June 8, 2015

 

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Members in the news

Members in the news

Mark Boulos, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) is the principal investigator and senior author of a new study suggesting that a lack of sleep can impede the brain’s ability to rid itself of toxins, as reported in this CTV News article. Dr. Boulos is an assistant professor and staff neurologist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto.

Brian Bressler, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology) co-created a new informational website with a patient, as reported in this Vancouver Sun article. The goal of the website is to provide readers with up-to-date and reliable information about Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Dr. Bressler is a gastroenterologist at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver and a clinical assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of British Columbia.

Ranjith Chandrasena, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) received the inaugural Champion of Telemedicine Award from the Ontario Telemedicine Network, as reported in Chatham This Week. Dr. Chandrasena is chief of staff and chief of Psychiatry at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance.

Patricia Daly, MD, FRCPC (Public Health and Preventative Medicine) was quoted in a The Province article about a public hearing on Vancouver’s marijuana dispensaries. Dr. Daly is chief medical health officer and vice president, Public Health, for Vancouver Coastal Health.

Ari Demirjian, MD, FRCPC (Dermatology) strongly emphasized the need to shield and protect your skin from the sun in an article in La Presse. Dr. Demirjian is a dermatologist in private practice in Montreal and an assistant professor of Medicine at the McGill University Health Centre.

Brent Friesen, MD, FRCPC (Community Medicine), medical officer of Health for Alberta Health Services, confirmed in a Global News article that they are supporting recommendations that e-cigarettes be seen and treated as regular tobacco products.

William Ghali, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) was quoted in a Global News article about a new technology that is being tested in Calgary in the hopes of preventing bed sores. Dr. Ghali is a professor in the departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences at the University of Calgary and scientific director of the O’Brien Institute for Public Health.

Cory Goldberg, MD, FRCSC (Plastic Surgery, Clinician Investigator Program) ) is pursuing a business degree; he explained his reasoning behind that decision in this The Globe and Mail article. Dr. Goldberg works in private practice in Etobicoke, Ont., where he specializes in facial rejuvenation and facial surgery. He is also a partner and medical director of Sanctuary Day Spa that operates in the Greater Toronto Area.

David Goldstein, MD, FRCPC (Anesthesiology) was part of a small team from Queen’s University that recently travelled to Rwanda to help the country’s medical personnel improve their pain management strategies, as reported in this Queen’s Gazette article. Dr. Goldstein is a faculty member in the Department of Anesthesiology at Queen’s and medical director, Information Technology, at Kingston General and Hotel Dieu hospitals.

Rakesh Jetly, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) is leading a new virtual reality therapy at The Ottawa Hospital for patients suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, as reported in this CBC News article. Colonel Jetly is senior psychiatrist for the Canadian Forces and mental health advisor to the surgeon general.

Albert Yonwon Jin, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) explained in this Kingston Whig-Standard article about the importance of swift action in the case of a stroke, and of continuous efforts to improve awareness and treatments of strokes in Canada. Dr. Jin is a neurologist at the Kingston General Hospital, as well as medical director of the Stroke Network of Southeastern Ontario.

Rachel Khadaroo, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery, Clinician Investigator Program, and Critical Care Medicine) co-authored a new study that supports evidence that severely obese patients who undergo emergency surgery have more risk for post-surgery complications, as reported in this Global News article. Dr. Khadaroo is an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Alberta, and a surgeon-scientist at the university hospital.

Stan Kutcher, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) explained in this Global News article that a recent incident of a 14-year-old getting arrested while seeking help for her mental health at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax is indicative of a system that needs to make some changes. Dr. Kutcher is the Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health and director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Care in Mental Health Policy and Training at Dalhousie University and the IWK.

André Lalonde, MD, FRCSC (Obstetrics and Gynecology) was honoured by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) last month in Quebec City, Que., with an award from the 2014-2015 SOGC President Diane Francoeur, and endorsed by their Council, in recognition of his lifetime contributions. Dr. Lalonde teaches in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Ottawa and McGill University. He was formerly executive vice president of the SOGC for more than 21 years.

Warren Lee, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Respirology, Critical Care Medicine, Clinician Investigator Program) and his research on new ways to better treat influenza was the focus of a CTV News video segment. Dr. Lee is a staff physician in Critical Care Medicine at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and scientist at the hospital’s Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science. He is also an assistant professor at the University of Toronto.

Mona Loutfy, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) shared shocking statistics in this CBC News special report on HIV rates on Saskatchewan reserves. Dr. Loutfy specializes in HIV-related care at the Maple Leaf Medical Clinic in Toronto and is research director at Maple Leaf Research. She is also a staff physician at Women’s College Hospital and an associate professor at the University of Toronto.

Ruth Anne Marrie, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) led a research team that determined that the life expectancy of individuals with multiple sclerosis has increased, although it still lags behind those without the disease — as reported in this Montreal Gazette article. Paul O’Connor, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) was also quoted. Dr. Marrie is director of the Multiple Sclerosis Clinic at the Health Sciences Centre Foundation in Winnipeg and an associate professor at the University of Manitoba. Dr. O’Connor is head of the Multiple Sclerosis Clinic and MS Research and Evoked Potentials Laboratory at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

Kelly MacDonald, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, and Medical Microbiology) commented in this CTV News article about the misplaced, persistent stigmas associated with HIV positive individuals who desire to have children. Dr. MacDonald is director of the HIV Research Program at the University of Toronto and a senior scientist for the Toronto General Research Institute.

Allison McGeer, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) and Bonnie Henry, MD, FRCPC (Community Medicine) were quoted in this Brandon Sun article, where they spoke to the similarities between the emerging MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) crisis in South Korea and Toronto’s SARS outbreak in 2003. Dr. McGeer, a SARS survivor, is director of Infection Control at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Dr. Henry is deputy health officer for the province of British Columbia.

Julio Montaner, OC, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) was quoted in a Vancouver Sun news article about a one million dollar donation that was provided by a medical marijuana producer to a University of British Columbia researcher to study the effects of medical marijuana on patients with HIV/AIDS. Dr. Montaner is director of the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS.

Matthew Morton, MD, FRCSC (Obstetrics and Gynecology) is the recipient of the 2015 CREOG National Faculty Award for Excellence in Resident Education, as selected by his graduating residents. This teaching award recognizes the best OB-GYN educator. Dr. Morton is an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Toronto. As reported in this Toronto Star article, Dr. Morton is currently under palliative care fighting stage-four brain cancer. He also previously worked at Mount Sinai Hospital. CTV News Toronto recently wrote a feature on Dr. Morton about his experiences being a doctor with incurable cancer.

Susan Poelman, MD, FRCPC (Dermatology) explained in this CBC News article about the great clinical potential of a new smartphone app that was developed by PhD student, Maryam Sadeghi, to help monitor possible skin cancer. Dr. Poelman is a dermatologist in Calgary and clinical lecturer in the Department of Medicine at the University of Calgary.

Harvey Rabin, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) contributed his expertise to a Breakfast Television – Calgary post about cystic fibrosis, as part of CF Awareness month. Dr. Rabin is director of the Adult CF Clinic at the Foothills Medical Centre and a professor of Medicine and Microbiology & Infectious Diseases at the University of Calgary.

Robert (Bob) Sheldon, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Cardiology) was featured in a Calgary Herald article about new research that is being done to try and find a genetic cause for chronic fainting. News of this study, quoting Dr. Sheldon, was also featured in CBC News, CTV News – Calgary, Metro News (Calgary) and The Province. Dr. Sheldon is a cardiologist with Alberta Health Services and professor of Medicine at the University of Calgary.

Eric Smith, MD, FRCPC (Neurology) spoke to CBC News Calgary about a new centre dedicated to studying dementia that was recently opened at the University of Calgary. Dr. Smith is an assistant professor of Neurology at the University of Calgary, medical director of the Cognitive Neurosciences Clinic and inaugural holder of the Kathy Taylor Chair in Vascular Dementia.

Anne Stephenson, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Respirology) explained in a Global News article the findings from a new study she led that found that lung transplants for patients with cystic fibrosis may prolong their lives significantly. Dr. Stephenson is a respirologist, specializing in cystic fibrosis, at the Toronto Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre based out of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

Sinthu Suntharalingam, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) warned that marijuana use can negatively impact the developing brains of teenagers, as reported in this CTV News article and CBC News report. Dr. Suntharalingam is a child and adolescent psychiatrist in Ottawa.

Steven Tanaka, MD, FRCPC (Anesthesiology) was the focus of a National Post feature and a Maclean’s article that both spoke of his passion for Japanese music — and of his active and personal role in introducing Japanese musicians in Canada. Dr. Tanaka is an anesthesiologist at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Toronto.

Carl van Walraven, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, General Internal Medicine) ) led a team of researchers in developing a new pilot scoring system that may accurately predict a patient’s chance of death within one year of a hospital admission, as reported in this CTV News article. Dr. van Walraven is a senior scientist with the Clinical Epidemiology Program at The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and a professor and staff member at the University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital.

Congratulations to the following Fellows who were honoured by the Canadian Medical Association in 2015:

Learn more about these, and all of the, 2015 CMA Award winners.

Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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In memoriam

In memoriam

Nicholas Bruchovsky, MD, FRCPC, died on March 22, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 78. He was certified by the Royal College in Medical Scientists in 1975 and spent most of his medical career at the BC Cancer Agency in Vancouver, treating patients with breast or prostate cancers; his research helped advance treatment for the latter. Outside of medicine, he was an accomplished art and history scholar. Read more about Dr. Bruchovsky »

Jack Cohen, MD, FRCSC, died on August 22, 2014, in Montreal, Que., at age 80. Dr. Cohen was certified by the Royal College in Plastic Surgery in 1966. He earned his medical degree from McGill University in 1959. Remembered as a caring surgeon, he practised at St. Mary’s Hospital and the Jewish General Hospital for 45 years. Dr. Cohen also loved studying history and the history of medicine. Read more about Dr. Cohen »

Donald Côté, MD, FRCSC, died on April 4, 2015, in Laval, Que., at age 76. Dr. Côté was certified by the Royal College in Plastic Surgery in 1969. He earned his medical degree from the University of Montreal in 1964. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends.

Francis Patrick Crowe, MBBS, FRCPC, died on April 14, 2015, in Dartmouth, N.S., at age 80. Dr. Crowe was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1973. He earned his medical degree from the Royal London Hospital Medical School. After moving to Canada, he spent close to 30 years working as a radiologist in Nova Scotia, lending his skills to the Sydney City, St. Rita’s, Glace Bay and Cape Breton Regional hospitals. Read more about Dr. Crowe »

Bernard (Bernie) Allan Davis, MD, FRCSC, died on February 17, 2015, in North York, Ont., at age 86. He was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1959. The same year he earned his MD from McGill University, he was awarded the Holmes Gold Medal and the Walter W. Chipman Medal in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Davis was the first chief of the OB-GYN Department at the Etobicoke General Hospital. Read more about Dr. Davis »

Paul Devenyi, MD, FRCPC, died on April 2, 2015, in North York, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Devenyi was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1976. He earned his medical degree from Semmelweis Medical University (Semmelweis University) in Budapest, Hungary, in 1954. Dr. Devenyi was the former head of Medical Services, Addiction Research Foundation, in Toronto. Read more about Dr. Devenyi »

Francis G. (Gordie) Gore-Hickman, MD, FRCPC, died on February 17, 2015, in Lethbridge, Alta., at age 90. Dr. Gore-Hickman was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1958. He earned his MD from the University of Alberta in 1950, after serving in the army during World War II. For more than 30 years, he worked at the Campbell Clinic in Lethbridge and was chief of Pediatrics at Lethbridge Regional Hospital from 1969-1984. Read more about Dr. Gore-Hickman »

Stanley M. Grant, MD, FRCPC, died on March 11, 2015, in West Vancouver, B.C., at age 90. Dr. Grant was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 1963. He earned his medical degree from McGill University in 1953, after spending the war years leading bombing missions as a navigator with the Royal Canadian Armed Forces. For many years he worked in Nanaimo, B.C., as the district coroner. Read more about Dr. Grant »

John (Jack) C. Laidlaw, CM, MD, FRCPC, died on June 6, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 94. Dr. Laidlaw was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1955. He earned his medical degree from the University of Toronto (U of T) in 1944 and practised as an endocrinologist for many years. Among his accomplishments and accolades, he was the founding director of the U of T Institute of Medical Science and received the school’s Faculty of Medicine Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014. He was inducted into the Order of Canada in 2003. Read more about Dr. Laidlaw » (Plus, U of T profile on Dr. Laidlaw)

Hugh Miller (Bud) Macsween, MD, FRCPC, died on April 19, 2015, in Fredericton, N.B., at age 73. He was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology in 1973. His passion for health advocacy led to his founding the Fredericton chapters of the United Ostomy Association of Canada, the Canadian Celiac Association and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada; he also played a key role in initiatives related to childhood vaccination, and organ and tissue donation. Read more about Dr. Macsween »

Alexander Judson McMahon, MD, FRCSC, died on April 15, 2015, in West Vancouver, B.C., at age 77. Dr. McMahon was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1969. He earned his medical degree from the University of Toronto in 1962 and completed his residency training in the same city. Before retiring in 1995, he spent 25 years in practice at the Lions Gate Hospital in Vancouver. Read more about Dr. McMahon »

Gérard G. Mignault, MD, FRCPC, died on February 26, 2015, in Verdun, Que., at age 93. Dr. Mignault was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1953. He earned his medical degree from the University of Montreal in 1949. For more than 40 years, he worked at the Hotel-Dieu Hospital in Montreal, where he helped create the first French-language Intensive Care Unit in Canada and the first Francophone Pain Clinic. Read more about Dr. Mignault »

Pierre Roméo Parenteau, MD, FRCPC, died on April 29, 2015, in Kingston, Ont., at age 74. Dr. Parenteau was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1980. He earned his medical degree from Laval University in 1971. Despite a long illness, he maintained a positive outlook on life that inspired those around him. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Read more about Dr. Parenteau »

Robert Eugene Rae, MD, FRCSC, died on May 21, 2015, in Saint John, N.B., at age 62. He was certified by the Royal College in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery in 1986. He practised as an otolaryngologist in Saint John for more than 20 years, where he was much-loved. Dr. Rae was a Past President of the Saint John Medical Society, New Brunswick Medical Society and Canadian Otolaryngological Society. Read more about Dr. Rae »

Prem Kumar Katta Rai, MBBS, FRCPC, died on January 10, 2015, in Lakeshore, Ont., at age 67. Dr. Rai was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1988. Born in Puttur, India, he earned his medical degree from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences in 1973. For 26 years, he practised Clinical Psychiatry in Windsor, Ont., and is remembered in particular for his professionalism, compassion and kindness. Read more about Dr. Rai »

Alfred C. Ronald, MB ChB, FRCPC, died on June 15, 2015, in Orangeville, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Ronald was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1957. After earning his medical degree from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) he practised medicine for close to 60 years — many of which were spent in Toronto where he was on staff at St. Joseph’s Health Centre. Dr. Ronald was awarded a Life Membership Award from the Ontario Medical Association in 1989. Read more about Dr. Ronald »

Norvel Walter F. (Pinky) Scratch, MD, FRCPC, died on April 3, 2015, in Stratford, Ont., at age 99. Dr. Scratch was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1949. He earned his medical degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1943 and served with the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry as a medical officer during World War II. He practised medicine in Stratford for almost 40 years. Read more about Dr. Scratch »

Ronald Dasrat Seegobin, MBChB, FRCPC, died on April 26, 2015, in Westbrook, Ont., at age 65. Dr. Seegobin was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1989. He earned his medical degree from the University of Oxford in 1974. For more than 25 years, he taught medicine at Queen’s University in the School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesiology, where he was also an avid researcher. Read more about Dr. Seegobin »

Mary Louise (Dr. Mary Lou) Spitzer, MD, FRCSC, died on April 10, 2015, in Dundas, Ont., at age 78. Dr. Spitzer was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1969. For many years, she practised in Dundas in partnership with Dr. Keith Mann and taught and mentored students at McMaster University. She also provided medical care to the poor and underserviced in Newfoundland, Haiti and Columbia. Read more about Dr. Spitzer »

Norman W. Struthers, MBChB, FRCSC, died on March 21, 2015, in Wooler, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Struthers was certified by the Royal College in Urology in 1984. He earned his medical degree from the University of Glasgow in 1950; in the late 1960s, he moved to Toronto where he worked at St. Michael’s Hospital for almost 30 years until his retirement. Dr. Struthers was an early practitioner of kidney transplants.
Read more about Dr. Struthers »

Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Building resiliency skills at the 2015 RAC Summit

RAC 3 member Khalid Azzam, MBBS, FACP, from Hamilton, Ont., at the 2015 RAC Summit.

RAC 3 member Khalid Azzam, MBBS, FACP, from Hamilton, Ont., at the 2015 RAC Summit.
Visit our facebook photo gallery for more photos from this event.


As part of its commitment to enhance membership engagement, the Royal College held its sixth Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) Summit in Ottawa on May 29, 2015, to discuss Fellows’ concerns, issues and ideas for the future.

“I thoroughly enjoyed my first RAC Summit,” said Erica Holloway, MD, FRCSC, a new RAC 5 member from Fredericton, N.B. “Moving forward, I hope to deepen my understanding of all the programs and services offered by the Royal College and help bridge the gap between the national meetings and local members.”

After a roundtable on priority RAC projects in the coming year, delegates were updated on several ongoing Royal College initiatives. These included the 2014 Physician Employment Study and a recent advocacy consultation process, both presented by Danielle Fréchette, the Royal College’s executive director of Health Systems Innovation and External Relations.

Delegates spent much of the day providing feedback on recent developments in Competence by Design. They discussed plans for the release of CanMEDS 2015 in October, heard the latest updates on competency-based continuing professional development (CPD), and explored the future role of CPD Educators within a competency-based CPD system.

The day ended with a plenary on building resiliency skills. The Royal College is starting to gather information and ideas on how it can customize and distribute resiliency resources for its Fellows.

Delegates learned from the experiences of Canada’s Department of National Defense (DND) Road to Mental Readiness program. Representatives from Resident Doctors of Canada (formerly CAIR) and the Fédération des Médecins Résidents du Québec later described how their organizations are adapting the DND model into a resiliency curriculum for residents.

“When I think about a day in the life of my role as a department chair, a lot of what I deal with is conflict management and dealing with adverse events,” said RAC 1 Chair Douglas Hedden, MD, FRCSC, one of the resiliency plenary speakers. He further stated that when it comes to personal resiliency “most of us think we don’t need help, but recognizing when we do is critically important.”


Visit our website for a longer summary of the 2015 RAC Summit.



The RACs and you

Through your RAC, you can have a regional voice in the strategic activities of the Royal College.

The Royal College has five RACs across Canada that each engage with Fellows in their region. Their goal is to listen to you and to bring your local concerns in specialty medicine to the attention of senior leadership at the Royal College.

Click on the map to meet your RAC chair and contact them about the issues that are important to you and your practice.

Visit the RACs online at royalcollege.ca/racs.


map Region 5 Region5 Region 5 Region 3 Region 2 Region 1 Region 3 Region 4

An exclusive benefit of Fellowship brought to you by your RAC

The Royal College’s Professional Development Grants are awarded year-round across Canada by RAC members to Fellows in their region. Funding is now available, up to $4,000 per application. Apply today to support your self-learning!

 

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Get CBD news delivered to your inbox: Find out what’s been done, what’s coming next…

Collaborating to draw the big picture: Discussions around competency-based CPD

Read the CBD Community Touchpoint to get the latest information on the progress of the Royal College’s Competence by Design (CBD) initiative, including what’s been done, what’s coming next and how you can get involved.

In our inaugural issue you’ll find the following items


Get the next issue sent right to your inbox; subscribe to CBD Community Touchpoint today!



Have a question?

Check out our updated CBD Resources page for a variety of informational documents and videos:

Or, send your questions and comments to cbd@royalcollege.ca. Questions of a broad nature could be the focus of a future item in an upcoming issue of Dialogue.

 

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Make autumn a bit less hectic: apply for an award/grant this summer

Make autumn a bit less hectic: apply for an award/grant this summer

A reminder to apply for a Royal College grant or Fellowship, or nominate a deserving colleague for one of the personal achievement awards listed below, by September 11, 2015 (4:00 p.m. EST).

Personal achievement awards

Grants and Fellowships

More details on the Royal College’s Awards and Grants program are available from www.royalcollege.ca/awards. Email awards@royalcollege.ca with questions.

 

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Interested in simulation-education? Learn more
(with our video series)

Debriefing in Healthcare Simulation – Advanced Skills by Dr. Michelle Chiu, FRCPC

We recently unveiled our new Simulation in Health Care Video Series that features foundational principles of simulation-based education, assessment and research.

This series was designed for clinical educators with an interest in simulation in health care; a new video will be released each month.

New video releases will be posted to the video series’ webpage and announced in upcoming issues of Dialogue.

More opportunities to learn about simulation in health care


2015 Simulation Summit

This annual event will take place November 25-26, 2015, at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alta., under the theme “Fresh Tracks: breaking trail-from theory to practice.” Registration is now open.

Simulation Educator Training (SET) course

Delivered over three days in an interactive environment that combines instruction with hands-on training, this course covers how to develop a simulation curriculum and integrate it with other learning activities, as well as evaluations, effective feedback and debriefing. The next course will be from November 22-24, 2015, in Calgary.

 

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“Can’t-miss” networking opportunities at ICRE/IRLS 2015

Check out our Top 5 “Can’t-miss” Networking Opportunities happening at this year’s events, from October 22-24, 2015, in Vancouver.

Although the term “social network” has a more complex meaning in today’s digital age than it once did, the practice of developing tangible networks in the face of a rapidly-changing medical landscape is still crucial. That’s why the International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) and its accompanying resident development event, the International Resident Leadership Summit (IRLS), are primed to offer participants an exciting forum to share ideas, challenges and innovations, and to advance training.

Check out our Top 5 “Can’t-miss” Networking Opportunities happening at this year’s events, from October 22-24, 2015, in Vancouver.

  1. Exciting exhibitors
    Strike up a lively conversation with one of our many exhibitors; or explore your creative side at The Body Electric Digital Visual Art Exhibition by browsing an inspiring selection of medicine and health care-themed art.

  2. Dynamic workshops/plenary sessions
    There is no question that the lineup for ICRE/IRLS workshops and plenaries offers excellent networking opportunities — the question is: how do you choose which sessions to attend? Reconnect with old colleagues and make new acquaintances at your choice of five plenaries, 15 learning tracks, 50+ workshops and approximately 200 poster and paper presentations. Learn more about 2015 programming by visiting the ICRE website.

  3. Social events: from scenery to “sommelier”
    Begin (or cap off) your day by making new connections in a fun and informal environment, during ICRE 2015’s social events! Join other outdoor enthusiasts on a guided walk or run around the beautiful downtown core of Vancouver, or spend the evening developing your knowledge of an (honorary) “eighth CanMEDS Role” — that of the Sommelier — by tasting premier wines from British Columbia.

  4. Mentorship program with MedEd experts
    ICRE’s mentorship program is making its triumphant return at this year’s conference, offering invaluable, one-on-one mentoring sessions and advice from experts in medical education. Session sign-up takes place on-site and spots are limited, so arrive early and don’t miss your chance to explore an issue in-depth with a knowledgeable mentor.

  5. The most important meal of the day: Lunchtime networking sessions
    Don’t want the momentum of the day to stop? Attend one of our compelling lunchtime networking sessions. Bon appétit!

To learn more or to register, visit www.royalcollege.ca/icre.

 

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Register for the 2015 Simulation Summit while early bird rates apply

Register for the 2015 Simulation Summit while early bird rates apply

Already polishing your skis in anticipation of the 2015 Simulation Summit in Banff, Canada? Put down that buffer and visit the conference website, where registration is now officially open!

Taking place November 25-26, the 2015 Simulation Summit promises to deliver one of its most scenic (and exciting) years yet, with dynamic conference workshops, plenaries and interactive sessions all in the heart of Banff National Park — a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Participants will have the opportunity to network with like-minded colleagues in the fields of simulation research and education, and explore how to enhance performance and incorporate simulation into real-life medical practices.

This two-day conference is open to all individuals engaged in the field of simulation, from health educators/researchers with an interest in simulation; to program directors, nurses, Canadian Forces personnel, and beyond.

Workshops will fill up quickly, so reserve your spot today and take advantage of our early bird fees! Don’t forget to book your travel and accommodations at the same time, to guarantee reservations and receive discounted rates.


Hear varied perspectives on simulation from our diverse lineup of speakers

Each year, the Simulation Summit brings together over 300 simulation educators and researchers from around the globe to collaborate, investigate advances in medical simulation, examine new technological advances and plan the integration of medical simulation for health professions across the education spectrum.

This diversity is reflected in the 2015 Simulation Summit’s exciting, international lineup of featured speakers that includes


Visit us online for a full list of this year’s featured speakers.

 

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