Dialogue

Vol. 15, No. 8 — August 2015
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College


THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Inhibiting the pain trajectory with a fresh approach to perioperative care

Annually, about 15-20 per cent of patients who have a surgical or medical intervention risk developing chronic pain. To ensure this doesn’t happen, a Royal College Fellow is directing a new and promising method to better predict and overcome challenges in patients’ postsurgical pain management.


Societal drivers behind new diplomas in (1) Addiction Medicine and (2) Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation

The process of approving new Areas of Focused Competence (AFC-Diplomas) is driven by the community of professionals. Find out how the Royal College’s newest diplomas will support patient needs.


New bioethics cases probe challenging topics on treatment of elders and global health

Two new cases have been added to our collection, featuring ethical dilemmas with regards to elder abuse/neglect and health professionals’ actions in a humanitarian crisis.


11 new research projects funded by Royal College grants (see titles and abstracts!)

Find out more about this year’s funded projects, and join us in celebrating our most recent Medical Education Research Grant and Royal College/AMS CanMEDS Grant recipients.


Members in the news


In memoriam



Other news bites

Psst…Using MAINPORT is about to get easier…

We are working to make MAINPORT, your ePortfolio, easier to understand and use in both its online and mobile format. Over the next few weeks, you’ll start to notice some changes.


Final reminder: Apply for a Royal College award or grant by SEPT. 11

The deadline to apply for a Royal College grant or fellowship, or to nominate a deserving colleague for one of several personal achievement awards, is fast approaching!


Plan to attend the next ASPIRE workshop (French program)

Participants will be trained as instructors and champions for the dissemination of patient safety curricula and will receive support to develop a patient safety educational plan for their institution.


Discount of 25% off Royal College Insignia merchandise

In anticipation of new items being added to the Royal College Insignia Collection, we are having an end of summer sale! From August 12 until September 12, shoppers can enjoy 25 per cent off. See items…


[New video] Team training and simulation

Less than 15 minutes in length, this video features Simone Crooks, MD, FRCPC, speaking on team-training using simulation. Short on time? Skip to the chapter that interests you.



Competence by Design

Workshops and new tools to mark the release of the updated CanMEDS Framework

Be among the first to see the revised framework and the launch of various tools designed to help support physicians’ integration of CanMEDS 2015 into their medical education systems.


Looking for “Competence by Design” info and resources?

Learn more and earn MOC credits — plus, more resources. We can’t implement CBD without your active involvement, support and collaboration. Let us know how we can make CBD work for you.



Conference news

Organize your itinerary early: Full list of ICRE workshops and sessions

With upwards of 50 workshops, ICRE 2015 gives participants ample opportunity to take part in specialized and general interest sessions, which cater to both professional and personal interests.


Plan your fall getaway to Banff and the 2015 Simulation Summit

Register for two exciting days of simulation-focused learning, research and practice. Attendees can also enjoy discounted room rates for three days prior, and following, the summit (subject to availability).


 

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Inhibiting the pain trajectory with a fresh approach to perioperative care

Inhibiting the pain trajectory with a fresh approach to perioperative care

Every year, thousands of Canadians undergo surgery. Most recover without incident, with pain naturally waning as they heal, but for 15-20 per cent of patients who have a surgical or medical intervention, their pain risks becoming chronic. To ensure this doesn’t happen, a Royal College Fellow is directing a new and promising method to better predict and overcome challenges in patients’ postsurgical pain management.

“We have so much data to show what the risk factors are with respect to people having chronic disability after surgery,” said anesthesiologist Hance Clarke, MD, FRCPC, PhD, medical director of the Pain Research Unit at Toronto General Hospital (TGH) and director of the hospital’s Transitional Pain Service in the Anesthesia Department.

“We thought we would put together a program to try and identify some of those threats early, and look to see if we could change the trajectory of those patients moving forward.”


Multidisciplinary clinic, variety of tools and strategies

Called the first program of its kind, the TGH’s Transitional Pain Service takes a fresh approach to managing patients’ postoperative pain by identifying patients early-on who are at risk of developing chronic pain, and providing them with a variety of tools and strategies to help them control their pain in the short and long terms.

The service is noteworthy for its use of both conventional and unconventional approaches to pain management, including non-opioid prescriptions, visualization exercises/psychological techniques, physical therapy and acupuncture. Joel Katz, PhD, Canada Research Chair in Health Psychology, and Aliza Weinrib, PhD, a clinical health psychologist who has been working with Dr. Katz at the Human Pain Mechanisms Lab at York University in Toronto, have developed specialized psychological interventions for patients at high risk for developing chronic postsurgical pain and pain disability. This diverse team of health care experts helps unpack patients’ anxieties, why their pain is more severe, and what underlying problem(s) might be contributing to this pain, rather than relying on prescription medications alone.

“We wanted to create a total multidisciplinary clinic; some of the strongest data to-date is associated with the psychological co-morbidities associated with pain,” Dr. Clarke explained.

The program’s one-year pilot was completed in June and Dr. Clarke believes that the service is on the right track.

“We found that with the appropriate knowledge, implemented early-on, we can dampen a lot of the physiological mechanisms that are underlying the pathological process.”


Battling the clock and flagging neuropathic pain early

Patients who might benefit from the Transitional Pain Service are identified during the preoperative surgical assessment based on known risk factors (e.g. those with high anxiety, depression, already on opioid medications or who have a pain history, etc.); or post-surgery, by staff in the Acute Pain Service (e.g. patients who are still reporting moderate-to-severe pain 72-96 hours into their recovery).

“We know that a pain can become chronic at about that three to six month time point,” said Dr. Clarke. “Most at-risk patients fall through the cracks in that time between walking out of the hospital and their follow-up with their surgeon six or more weeks later. The goal here is to close that gap.”

Patients in the program are guaranteed an in-clinic visit within two-to-three weeks of their discharge, to work out a tailored plan to assist with their recovery. This follow-up plan includes visits to the TGH’s pain clinic, educational components and consults with their family physician. The focus is on controlling their pain, weaning them off opioid medications, monitoring them and returning them to their baseline faster than the current standard of care.

“One of the things that our [pilot] data shows is that post-surgical pain is an excellent neuropathic pain model,” said Dr. Clarke. “The patients that remained on the opioid-based medications at three months, very-early had acute neuropathic pain indicators. People who can indicate that they’re having high neuropathic pain need to have more aggressive treatment early on. If we can sub-select these patients, we can then dedicate the resources to them more appropriately.”

Watch Ms. Slater’s full testimony in this video from UHN Toronto.


Helping patients regain control

“These are all of the medications that I was on before I joined the Transitional Pain Program at Toronto General Hospital,” said patient Sarah Slater, holding up more than six pill bottles. Ms. Slater, one of the first participants in the hospital’s Transitional Pain Service, credits the program for reducing her prescription intake to only two non-opioid drugs to help her manage her pain; but more importantly, regaining control over her life.

Watch Ms. Slater’s full patient testimony in this video from UHN Toronto.



Approach could be introduced at other hospitals

Dr. Clarke and his team are still analyzing the pilot’s results with an aim to isolate data on the characteristics of who should be treated, what interventions were most successful and when they should be applied. They hope to eventually publish the results. Already, their service has generated interest from colleagues in Ontario and British Columbia looking to introduce similar programs at their hospitals.

“Resources being what they are, it would take some dedication, but I think almost any hospital that’s doing major surgery could use this approach,” Dr. Clarke stated. “I would recommend starting with a dedicated physician and a psychologist to consider the underlying issues driving patients’ subjective pain.”

Moving forward, Dr. Clarke expects the TGH will continue to offer this service in some form or another, and he is flexible to tweaking the service’s makeup based on the results of their pilot assessment and new research. For example, they are now considering adding a yoga program as a result of research led by Katy Curtis, a PhD candidate in the Clinical Psychology program at York University, which found that yoga may decrease pain and increase acceptance and mindfulness in women with fibromyalgia.

“If I were to predict the future, I’d say the pre-surgical intervention piece will be huge: to find this subset of at-risk patients and give them the tools before surgery to cope and follow-up post-discharge to the point that they’re back to functioning… I think we’ll see even better improvements.”

 

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Societal drivers behind new diplomas in (1) Addiction Medicine and (2) Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation

Societal drivers behind new diplomas in (1) Addiction Medicine and (2) Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation

Two new Areas of Focused Competence (AFC-Diplomas) were recognized by the Royal College’s Education Committee at their spring 2015 meeting:

  1. Addiction Medicine: an area of enhanced competence that is devoted to meeting the unique prevention, assessment and treatment needs of individuals suffering from the impacts of substance use disorders and process addictions.

  2. Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation: an area of enhanced competence devoted to the optimal provision and advancement of care for heart failure patients through expert application and integration of medical, surgical, device therapies, and transplantation.

Working groups will now be formed to develop national standards documents in these two areas and to, subsequently, develop application forms for universities who wish to establish an accredited program for these diplomas.

With these additions, 18 AFC (Diplomas) have now been recognized by the Royal College.


Meeting societal needs through two new AFC (Diplomas)

The process of approving new categories of disciplines is driven by the community of professionals. The Royal College’s Committee on Specialties (COS) has, as its primary function, oversight of the recognition of disciplines in Canada. The COS receives applications from interested groups — typically, from National Specialty Societies or existing committees related to the discipline (e.g. Specialty Committees). Then, through an extensive and gradual review process that includes national and external consultation with more than 200 stakeholders in medical education, the committee considers the applications. If accepted by the COS, they proceed to the Education Committee for final approval.

ADDICTION MEDICINE

At their spring meeting, the COS approved a joint application from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine to recognize Addiction Medicine as a new AFC (Diploma). As these groups argued, the societal need for such a diploma is significant: more than one in five Canadians are likely to experience a substance use disorder or process addiction in their lifetimes. Establishing an AFC (Diploma) would ensure a common knowledge and skill-level in Addiction Medicine to ensure that this treatment area is highly-developed to meet the needs of Canadians.

The COS accepted the applicants’ premise that there is no one specialist discipline uniquely responsible for this patient population and, as such, multiple routes of entry to this AFC will be facilitated. This new AFC (Diploma) will also provide a recognized designation for practitioners who have devoted their medical practices to working in this area but who – up until recently – lacked a route for formal credentials.

ADVANCED HEART FAILURE AND CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION

Applicants from the Canadian Cardiovascular Society successfully presented their case to the COS, explaining that an AFC (Diploma) in Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation is essential in light of the convergence of two factors: an increasing prevalence of heart failure among Canadians and widespread new technology in cardiac transplantation. Through their review process, the COS agreed that Canadians would benefit from national standards for the increasing number of highly-trained specialists who have additional expertise in managing the complexities of adult and pediatric patients with heart failure.


Applications for consideration as an AFC (Diploma): Upcoming deadline

The next deadline to submit an application for consideration as an Area of Focused Competence (Diploma) is September 1, 2015, for Part I review at the fall 2015 Committee on Specialties meeting.

Note: This deadline relates to receipt of the final version of applications. If you are interested in applying for recognition, you are encouraged to express initial interest as early as six months prior (e.g. May 1 for the October meeting and October 1 for the April meeting) to allow time for the Office of Specialty Education to work with you and to guide you through the application process.

Please contact cos@royalcollege.ca for more information.

Quick links


 

Second and third graduates from a Royal College AFC (Diploma) program

In addition to the two new AFC disciplines recently recognized, the Royal College wishes to congratulate two Fellows who have successfully completed training in a Royal College AFC (Diploma) program:

In April 2015, we announced Maha Badawi, MD, FRCPC, DRCPSC, as the Royal College’s first AFC (Diploma) graduate, after she successfully completed her specialized training in Transfusion Medicine earlier this year.

To find out more about training in an AFC (Diploma) program, please contact diplomas@royalcollege.ca.

 

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New bioethics cases probe challenging topics on treatment of elders and global health

New bioethics cases probe challenging topics on treatment of elders and global health

Two new bioethics cases have been added to our collection, featuring ethical dilemmas with regards to elder abuse/neglect and health professionals’ actions in a humanitarian crisis.

Find out more, below, or learn how you can contribute a case of your own!


Learn and earn Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credits — here’s how!


Access the Royal College’s complete bioethics curriculum at www.royalcollege.ca/bioethics


NEW CASES – SUMMER 2015


Case excerpt:

Mrs. C is an 84-year-old woman who was brought to the emergency department after her concerned landlord called the paramedics. The paramedics report finding Mrs. C seated in a recliner, unable to get up. Mrs. C is unable to give an account of how long she had been stuck in the chair; the paramedics estimate somewhere between 24-48 hours.

Mrs. C. is a widow who shares her apartment with her only child, Donald. Donald acts as Mrs. C’s primary caretaker and was not in the apartment when the paramedics arrived. According to the landlord, Mrs. C’s health has been in steady decline over the past year. …

Read the full case (Section I, Case 1.6) »


Case excerpt:

You are a newly registered Canadian physician volunteering in a public hospital as part of its surgical team, in a country that has just experienced devastating losses of life due to genocide. The local health system is dramatically strained under the pressures of the recent fighting, and welcomes assistance, but you know that your presence is still precarious as tensions within the country are still high. You, like the other foreign volunteers, do not know the local languages very well.

You are assisting with a surgery in the clinic; there is only one surgeon – a local who has been with this hospital for over a decade. The operation is an emergency abdominal surgery for a woman who came to the hospital confused and in distress. After the abdominal issue has been repaired, the surgeon announces his intention to sterilize the patient by performing an irreversible tubal ligation. …

Read the full case (Section VIII, Case 8.2) »


CALL FOR PROPOSALS


Ethical challenges abound; share your expertise on a topic of your choosing!

The Royal College’s bioethics curriculum provides relevant and practical learning to help Fellows and residents navigate new and emerging ethical issues and challenges facing the practice of medicine in Canada.

Consider contributing to this growing curriculum base by sharing your expertise with colleagues. To find out more, including a list of suggested topics and submission guidelines, consult our call for proposals.

Questions can be directed to bioethics@royalcollege.ca

 

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11 new research projects funded by Royal College grants
(see titles and abstracts!)

11 new research projects funded by Royal College grants (see titles and abstracts!)

Each year, the Royal College supports medical educators and researchers who are working across a range of disciplines, health settings and environments to further educational research development. Please join us in celebrating our most recent Medical Education Research Grant and Royal College/AMS CanMEDS Grant recipients!


2015 MEDICAL EDUCATION RESEARCH GRANT (MERG) RECIPIENTS

This grant supports quality research in postgraduate medical education and continuing professional development involving Royal College Fellows. The project titles and principal investigators of this year’s funded projects are below.

Visit the MERG recipients’ webpage to read project abstracts and to learn how these projects will impact medical education research, according to the principal investigators.


ROYAL COLLEGE/AMS CANMEDS RECIPIENTS

This grant supports research, development or implementation of projects that enhance specialty education through the key CanMEDS Roles. The winning projects are listed, below.

Visit the Royal College CanMEDS/AMS recipients’ webpage to see the project abstracts.

Two exciting opportunities to receive funding for your studies in medical education

We are currently accepting applications for the Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education. This one-year fellowship helps specialists acquire knowledge and skills in the field of medical education in order to develop educational programs, evaluation methods and medical education research.

Learn more or apply for this grant »

Deadline: September 18, 2015


New! Request for Proposals: Research for Assessment within Competency-based Education

We are currently accepting applications for research to advance understanding of assessment within competency-based education. Funding is to a maximum of $25,000 per project for a two-year period.

Learn more or apply for this grant »

Deadline: September 18, 2015

 

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Members in the news

Members in the news

As reported by the Toronto Star, Henry Ahn, MD, PhD, FRCSC (Orthopedic Surgery) is one of several researchers involved in a study that found seniors in Canada often wait longer for spinal surgeries. Dr. Ahn works at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto where he is an associate scientist at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute. He is also a member of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry network, who commissioned the report.
Read:Seniors waiting longer for spinal surgery, Toronto study says.”

The late Jennifer Bender, MD, FRCPC (Anesthesiology) was featured in a The Globe and Mail article that reflected on her past verbal support for organ donation that was recently put into practice, following her untimely death in June. Dr. Bender was an anesthesiologist at St. Joseph’s Health Centre in Toronto and an assistant professor in the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto. Colleague, Peter Menikefs, MD, FRCPC (Anesthesiology), anesthetist-in-chief of the Department of Anesthesia at St. Joseph’s, was also quoted. Read:In death, doctor’s organ donation mission receives new life.”

A tribute to the late John Carter (JC) Callaghan, OC, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery, Thoracic Surgery) was submitted to The Globe and Mail by his granddaughter who shared how her daughter benefitted from the Tetralogy heart repair surgery that Dr. Callaghan helped perfect years earlier. Mohammed Al Aklabi, MD, FRCSC (Cardiac Surgery), a pediatric cardiac surgeon at the Stollery Children’s Hospital/Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute in Edmonton, performed the surgery. Read:My cardiac surgeon grandfather saved my baby long after he passed away.”

Sara Davison, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Nephrology) is helping outline a framework to develop new international guidelines on kidney palliative care, as lead author of a new report that was published this spring in Kidney International. Dr. Davison is a professor in the Division of Nephrology at the University of Alberta.
Read:Finding a pathway to better palliative care for kidney patients.”

Neil Gibson, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, General Internal Medicine) and Damian Paton-Gay, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery, Critical Care Medicine) participated in a recent Royal College Acute Critical Events Simulation (ACES) course, as reported by the Edmonton Journal. Dr. Gibson is director of simulation at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry; Dr. Paton-Gay is a clinical assistant professor at the same university, as well as an ACES course instructor. Read:Critical events simulation course at U of A improves emergency care.”

Sara Gray, MD, FRCPC (Emergency Medicine, Critical Care Medicine) was quoted in a Toronto Star article that reported on a recent emergency response/preparedness exercise that was carried out at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Dr. Gray is a staff physician and chair of the hospital’s Emergency Preparedness Committee. Read:How St. Michael’s Hospital is preparing for a major disaster.”

Stephen Hwang, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) was the focus of a column in The Toronto Star about his goal to make a difference in the care of homeless, poor and marginalized individuals. Dr. Hwang is director of the Centre for Research in Inner City Health at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and a physician at St. Michael’s and Seaton House — a homeless shelter for men. Read:Doctor pushes the boundaries of health-care: Goar.”

Derek Jonker, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology) is leading a new clinical trial using antibody-based immunotherapy that could change how cancer is treated. Dr. Jonker is medical director of the Clinical Trials Department at the Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre and chairman of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group – Gastrointestinal Site Committee. Read:Ottawa researchers launch clinical trial for new cancer treatment.”

David Juurlink, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology and Clinician Investigator Program) contributed a piece to the Toronto Star warning about the overuse — and resulting negative effects — of opioid prescriptions to manage pain. Dr. Juurlink is head of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and medical toxicologist at the Ontario Poison Centre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Read:Doctors’ Notes: Proceed with caution on painkillers.”

Joshua Landy, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine) was once again in the news, as a result of his popular Figure 1 app. CTV News reported on the genesis of his creation and its growth. Dr. Landy is a Critical Care physician at the Scarborough Hospital. Read:What's that?': Pros compare notes with 'Instagram for doctors' app.”

Ian MacDonald, CM, MD, FRCSC (Ophthalmology) is pioneering a new gene therapy that could help treat and restore vision for thousands of individuals suffering from choroideremia — a form of inherited blindness. Dr. MacDonald is a professor of Ophthalmology in the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta. News of this new trial was featured in the Edmonton Sun and Global News. Read:Canada’s first human gene trial for eyes underway” or “First Canadian gene therapy trial for blindness sees positive results.”

Julio Montaner, OC, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) shared with The Globe and Mail about a campaign he is spearheading to aggressively increase the diagnosis and treatment of people living with HIV by 2020. Dr. Montaner is director of the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and special advisor on HIV Therapeutics to the executive director of the United Nations AIDS Programme. Read:How antiretroviral drugs can suppress HIV, one pill at a time.”

Päivi Miettunen, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics, Rheumatology) is helping juvenile arthritis patients creatively express their condition and how it affects them using clinical art therapy and digital storytelling. Dr. Miettunen is a pediatric rheumatologist at the Alberta’s Children’s Hospital, clinical associate at the McCraig Institute for Bone and Joint Health and an assistant professor of Medicine at the University of Calgary. Read:Digital storytelling helps children express how arthritis affects them.”

Gordon Rubenfeld, MD, FRCPC (Critical Care Medicine) was quoted in the National Post in an article about the treatment of sepsis in patients, and efforts to improve early detection. Dr. Rubenfeld is a Critical Care specialist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto and a professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto.
Read:‘Inadequate patient assessment’: Canadian doctors missing glaring signs of sepsis.”

Lynora Saxinger, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) spoke with The Province about the common overuse of antibiotics in Canada’s health care system and the need for physicians and patients to work together to increase education and awareness. Dr. Saxinger is an associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Alberta. Watch:Dr. Lynora Saxinger on the overuse of antibiotics.”

Garnette Sutherland, CM, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery) is being awarded a third honour from NASA, this time receiving their Exceptional Technology Achievement Medal in recognition of his contributions through Project neuroArm. Dr. Sutherland is a professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Calgary, and director of the Seaman Family MR Research Centre. Read:Neurosurgeon receives third honour from NASA for Project neuroArm.”

Lorne Tyrell, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) is one of several Fellows assisting in the development of a new immunotherapy treatment for cancer, as reported by the Edmonton Journal. Dr. Tyrell is director of the Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, at the University of Alberta. Michael Smylie, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology) and John Walker, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology) of the University of Alberta, are also part of the “Dream Team.” Read:University of Alberta ‘dream team’ using molecules and powerful computer to battle cancer.”

Jonathan White, MD, PhD, FRCSC (General Surgery) who gained notoriety for his Surgery 101 series recently reached a milestone with more than two million downloads from people in more than 200 countries. Dr. White recently spoke with CBC Radio and Global News - Edmonton. Dr. White is a surgeon at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Edmonton and the first Tom Williams Endowed Chair in Surgical Education at the University of Alberta.
Listen:Surgery 101”  |  Watch:Teaching OR basics in ‘Surgery 101’.”  |  Read:Muppets, Lego and surgeons hit medical education milestone.”

Warren Yunker, MD, FRCSC (Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery) helped explain so-called “Alberta Nose” and some treatment options to Breakfast Television – Calgary (CityTV). Dr. Yunker is a clinical assistant professor at the Cumming School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, at the University of Calgary. He is also a pediatric ear, nose and throat specialist at the Alberta Children’s Hospital. Read:Alberta Nose.”


Congratulations to the all of the new appointments to the Order of Canada, including a number of Royal College Fellows! (Descriptions, below, taken from the official Order of Canada Appointments announcement).


Appointed as an Officer of the Order of Canada


Appointed a Member of the Order of Canada

Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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In memoriam

In memoriam

Jennifer Suzanne Bender, MD, FRCPC, died on June 19, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 42. Dr. Bender was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 2003. At the time of her death, she was as an anesthesiologist at St. Joseph’s Health Care in Toronto where she’d worked for more than a decade. After her sudden death, her organs were donated – an action she strongly supported. Read more about Dr. Bender »

Denis Charette, MD, FRCSC, died on April 27, 2015, in Montreal, Que., at age 90. Dr. Charette was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1956. After training in Oncology in New York and London, he returned to Canada where he practised and taught surgery for the next 50 years at hospitals in the Montreal region, in particular at L’Hôpital Notre-Dame. Read more about Dr. Charette »

Charles Dyson, MD, FRCSC, died on June 2, 2015, in London, Ont., at age 95. Dr. Dyson was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1949. Until his retirement in 1993, he practised his discipline in London, Ont., where he is credited with introducing intraocular lens implantation and the use of posterior chamber lenses. He was also formerly chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Western. Read more about Dr. Dyson »

Grant Haviland Eckert, MD, FRCPC, died on May 6, 2015, in North York, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Eckert was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1969. Prior to his medical training, he served as a navigation officer during World War II. A gentleman to those who knew him, he is also remembered for his fondness of gardening and spending time with his family. Read more about Dr. Eckert »

Ian Frost, MD, FRCPC, died on July 18, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 69. Dr. Frost was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1978. A motorcycle enthusiast, he was tragically killed in a recent motor vehicle accident. At the time of his death, he worked as an anesthesiologist at the Riverside Campus of The Ottawa Hospital where he was very well-liked and respected. Read more about Dr. Frost »

David Alexander Ian Grewar, MBChB, FRCPC, died on April 30, 2015, in Winnipeg, Man., at age 93. Dr. Grewar was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1959. For more than 50 years, he worked as a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital, Shriner’s Hospital and St. Boniface Hospital — where he was also chief of Pediatrics until his retirement. In addition, he made numerous trips north to care for Aboriginal and Inuit children. Read more about Dr. Grewar »

Warren Edward Harrison, MD, FRCSC, died on June 17, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 77. Dr. Harrison was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1980. In addition to a notable medical career during which he delivered more than 3000 babies, he also had a prominent military career. Read more about Dr. Harrison »

Gordon Holmes Hawks, MD, FRCPC, died on May 5, 2015, in North York, Ont., at age 98. Dr. Hawks was certified by the Royal College in Medical Microbiology in 1952. He served in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, later as Captain, from 1943 until the end of the war. He then practised bacteriology at the Banting Institute, followed by many years at St. Michael’s Hospital, as head of Microbiology, and teaching at the University of Toronto. Read more about Dr. Hawks »

Jan Michael Kornder, MD, FRCPC, died on May 6, 2015, in Surrey, B.C., at age 58. Dr. Kornder was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1985. A respected cardiologist, he worked for many years at Surrey Memorial Hospital and will be remembered as the “Big Heart Doctor” with a passion for research, exceptional care, and patient safety. Read more about Dr. Kornder »

Andrew Noel Lin, MD, FRCPC, died on June 6, 2015, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 60. Dr. Lin was certified by the Royal College in Dermatology in 1984. At the time of his death, he worked at the University of Alberta as an associate professor in the Division of Dermatology, where he was well-liked and well-respected as a teacher and mentor. In 2012, he received the Royal College’s Regional Mentor of the Year Award. Read more about Dr. Lin »

Margaret Grace Norman, MD, FRCPC, died on May 17, 2015, in Toronto, Ont., at age 81. Dr. Norman was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 1965. She had a full career, during which she divided her time between work in Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver. In 2008, she received the Award of Meritorious Contributions to Neuropathology from the American Association of Neuropathologists. Read more about Dr. Norman »

William Arthur Oatway, MDCM, FRCPC, died on May 12, 2015, in Moncton, N.B., at age 93. Dr. Oatway was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1955. For 35 years, he worked in the Department of Anaesthesia at Moncton Hospital, serving at times as chief of the department, president of the medical staff and as medial staff representative on the Board of Trustees. In 2002, the city of Moncton granted him Honorary Citizenship. Read more about Dr. Oatway »

John David Roger, MD, FRCPC, died on June 14, 2015, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 98. After earning his medical degree at the University of Toronto in 1939, Dr. Roger was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine (1946) and Diagnostic Radiology (1952).

Bluma Tischler, MD, FRCPC, died on May 16, 2015, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 90. Dr. Tischler was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1955. She overcame many obstacles to study medicine, doing her training over four stages and in four languages. For 33 years, she worked at the specialized Woodlands School in New Westminster, B.C., and helped champion the use of the Guthrie test to screen newborns for PKU (phenylketonuria). Read more about Dr. Tischler »

Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Psst…Using MAINPORT is about to get easier…

Psst…Using MAINPORT is about to get easier…

Responding to your feedback, we are working to make MAINPORT, your ePortfolio, easier to understand and use in both its online and mobile format.

Over the next few weeks, you’ll start to notice some changes. Loading and submissions will be faster. Instructions will be clearer. There’ll also be greater opportunities to reflect on the outcomes of your learning activities for practice.

And in addition to an updated iPhone App, we’ll soon be launching an Android-friendly MAINPORT App to better support learning and recording on the go. Keep your eyes on MAINPORT, and let us know if the changes we have made are meeting your needs: cpd@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Final reminder: Apply for a Royal College award or grant
by SEPT. 11

Final reminder: Apply for a Royal College award or grant by SEPT. 11

A final reminder that September 11, 2015 (4:00 p.m. EST) is the deadline to apply for a Royal College grant or fellowship, or to nominate a deserving colleague for one of the personal achievement awards listed below.

More details, including submission guidelines and eligibility, are available from www.royalcollege.ca/awards. Email awards@royalcollege.ca with questions.

 

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Plan to attend the next ASPIRE workshop (French program)

Plan to attend the next ASPIRE workshop (French program)

The Royal College, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and the Collège des médecins du Québec are partners in presenting a French ASPIRE (Advancing Safety for Patients in Residency Education) program this November.


Should you attend?


What: ASPIRE is a national faculty development certificate program focused on teaching and education of patient safety and quality improvement, with an aim to enhance the capacity of institutions to provide patient safety training.

Who: This program is meant for French medical educators (in medical, surgical or other health professions) interested in teaching and assessing patient safety and quality improvement.

Where: This four-day program will be held at the Centre d’apprentissage de l’Académie CHUM in Montreal, and will feature a state-of-the-art simulation session.

When: November 3-6, 2015


Benefits of ASPIRE for attendees


ASPIRE benefits participants and their institutions by coaching attendees on how to

Participants will be trained as instructors, faculty resources and champions for the dissemination of patient safety curricula and will receive onsite support to develop a patient safety educational plan for their institution.

View the program (French only) »

Register for ASPIRE (French program) »

Registration closes on October 20, 2015. Book now, as space is limited.

 

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Discount of 25% off Royal College Insignia merchandise

Discount of 25% off Royal College Insignia merchandise

In anticipation of new items being added to the Royal College Insignia Collection, we are having an end of summer sale!

From August 12 until September 12, 2015, shoppers can enjoy 25 per cent off all Royal College insignia products* using promo code: INSIGNIA2015 (case sensitive).

Visit the online store now at www.royalcollege.ca/insignia.

Since its debut more than 50 years ago, the Royal College Insignia Collection has been proudly worn by Fellows across Canada and worldwide. Over the years, the collection has expanded to include a wide variety of Royal College merchandise, including ties and scarves, clothing, pens and mugs. Royal College Fellows are recognized and respected worldwide; here is a chance to visually showcase your Fellowship!

Not in stock? If there is a particular item that you would like to see in the store, we’d like to hear from you. Please contact insignia@royalcollege.ca.

*Offer applies to insignia products only.

 

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[New video] Team training and simulation

Team Training and Simulation by Dr. Simone Crooks, FRCPC

A third video has been released in our new Simulation in Health Care Video Series that features foundational principles in simulation-based education, assessment and research. This series is designed for clinical educators with an interest in simulation in health care.


Watch the next video in this series

Less than 15 minutes in length, this video features Simone Crooks, MD, FRCPC, staff anesthesiologist at The Ottawa Hospital and simulation-educator at the University of Ottawa Skills and Simulation Centre, speaking on team-training using simulation.

Short on time? Skip to the chapter that interests you, using the video navigation links in the video description.


More videos, each month

New video releases will be posted each month to the video series’ webpage and announced in upcoming issues of Dialogue.

Catch up with videos 1 and 2:

Up next: Assessment (in Competency Based Medical Education)


More opportunities to learn about simulation in health care


2015 Simulation Summit

This year’s summit takes place from November 25-26, 2015, at the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel in Banff, Alta., under the theme “Fresh Tracks: breaking trail-from theory to practice.” Registration is now open.

Simulation Educator Training (SET) course

This course covers how to develop a simulation curriculum and integrate it with other learning activities, as well as evaluations, effective feedback and debriefing. The next course is November 22-24, 2015, in Calgary.

 

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Workshops and new tools to mark the release of the updated CanMEDS Framework

Workshops and new tools to mark the release of the updated CanMEDS Framework

In just two months, the Royal College will officially unveil the updated CanMEDS 2015 Physician Competency Framework and refreshed CanMEDS Diagram. As the foundational project behind the Competence by Design initiative, the updated framework is designed to support a next-generation competency-based medical education model that spans the continuum of a physician’s career.

In support of this release, a variety of workshops have been planned for this fall’s International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) in Vancouver. Attend and be among the first to see the revised framework, as well as the launch of various tools designed to help equip physicians to better understand and incorporate the updated framework into their medical education systems, and to prepare for the implementation of Competence by Design.


Have questions about CanMEDS 2015? Attend ICRE for answers

This year’s conference will be a prime time to get answers to any questions you may have about the new CanMEDS 2015 framework and the Royal College’s Competence by Design initiative.

Activities taking place at ICRE related to these two projects include

Register for ICRE 2015 to participate in these events and, this October, visit the CanMEDS booth onsite at the conference to pick up your copy of the updated CanMEDS Physician Competency Framework (free for all ICRE attendees).

We hope to see you there!

 

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Looking for “Competence by Design” info and resources?

Looking for “Competence by Design” info and resources?

The move to competency-based medical education will affect all areas of residency training and lifelong learning. As the Royal College’s Competence by Design (CBD) initiative progresses, we are committed to making sure all our Fellows, partners and stakeholders have access to regular updates, and have the opportunity to get involved and have their voices heard.

We cannot implement CBD without your active involvement, support and collaboration. Let us know how we can make CBD work for you.

Learn more:


We encourage you to contact us at cbd@royalcollege.ca with your thoughts, feedback and/or questions.

 

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Organize your itinerary early: Full list of ICRE workshops and sessions

Organize your itinerary early: Full list of ICRE workshops and sessions

The full lineup of in-conference workshops, sessions and panels for the 2015 International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) was released last month, bringing you more reasons to get excited for this year’s conference in Vancouver from October 22-24!

With upwards of 50 workshops from 15 different Learning Tracks, ICRE 2015 gives participants ample opportunity to take part in specialized and general interest sessions, which cater to both professional and personal interests.

While planning your ICRE itinerary, consider registering for workshops that fall under two of our key learning tracks for this year:

View the full conference program on the ICRE 2015 website. Register online before September 14, 2015, to take advantage of our early bird rates.


SPREAD THE WORD

Do you know a resident searching to enrich his or her leadership skills?
Residents who attend the 2015 International Resident Leadership Summit (IRLS) will benefit from a full lineup of resident-focused workshops, plenaries and panels that cover a variety of relevant topics, including

As one of Canada’s premier resident development events, IRLS provides residents with an unrivalled opportunity to enhance and develop their leadership skills while expanding their professional networks. The next IRLS will take place this October 23-24, 2015, in Vancouver, in conjunction with ICRE 2015.

Residents can now register for IRLS, or learn more on the IRLS website.

 

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Plan your fall getaway to Banff and the 2015 Simulation Summit

Plan your fall getaway to Banff and the 2015 Simulation Summit

As summer slowly begins to inch towards its inevitable end, simulation in medicine enthusiasts can look forward to a late fall getaway to Banff, Alta., for the 2015 Simulation Summit, this November 25-26.

The conference’s learner-based program is already building excitement. Whether you’re a simulation educator interested in a competency-based curriculum, a specialist physician curious about hi-fidelity simulation with “patient” mannequins, or a simulation enthusiast wondering about the link between gaming and simulation; this year’s Simulation Summit has a unique workshop waiting for you.


Full workshop lineup released

Register early and choose from among the 20 dynamic workshops being offered at this year’s conference. Examples include

Visit the Simulation Summit website to browse the full list of workshops and to register for two exciting days of simulation-focused learning, research and practice.

Workshops fill up quickly, so reserve your spot today and take advantage of early bird fees.


Extend your stay in Banff with discounted accommodation

The 2015 Simulation Summit might be the reason for your trip to Banff this November — but the Fairmont Banff Springs resort could be an excuse for you to extend your stay. Nestled amongst the picturesque mountain community of Banff, the family-friendly resort offers a wide-range of activities, dining experiences and adventure for all ages.

Discover all Banff has to offer while attending the 2015 Simulation Summit. Conference participants can enjoy discounted accommodation rates three days prior to, and three days following, the 2015 Simulation Summit (subject to availability).

Travel and accommodation details are available on our website.

 

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