Dialogue

Vol. 16, No. 4 — April 2016
Welcome to Dialogue, your link to the Royal College

THIS MONTH’S HEADLINES


Here’s how two docs changed a health system 6100 km away

These two doctors were instrumental to bringing epilepsy surgery to Peru. Read their story.


Is the international conference you are attending eligible for an “accredited” credit rating?

Under the MOC Program, accredited conferences are eligible for one credit per hour.


Your guide to Annual Dues (2016-2017)

Everything you need to know in one convenient place.


Competency-based CPD – complete our quick poll

We want your input on a competency-based continuing professional development model.



PLUS, MORE NEWS


Founding member of MSF Canada wins our top humanitarian award

“He has done many of the things that we would wish to do but are unable to do…” Meet our 2016 Teasdale-Corti winner.


How well do you know our award recipients?

Using just five biographical details each, can you guess the winner in each award category?


New Royal College website to debut in May

When you visit www.royalcollege.ca next month, you'll experience a more modern website with some key changes.


Celebrating Royal College volunteers – we couldn’t do it without you!

We are fortunate to have so many volunteers. It’s National Volunteer Week and we’d like to thank them.


Bestselling author, Dr. Kaveh Shojania, headlines ICRE 2016

The co-author of, Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America’s Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes, wants to promote a shift in thinking.


Record your best “rant” for the 2016 Simulation Summit

If you’re passionate about simulation-based education, we want to hear your rant. Why? Read and find out.


News bites

Want to know what we were up to last year? Interested in patient safety and quality improvement? Have bioethical expertise? Get details on these topics and more.


Members in the news

In memoriam


 

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Here’s how two docs changed a health system 6100 km away

Dr. Steven in the operating theatre in Lima.

Dr. Steven in the operating theatre in Lima.



“Since this program has started, the care of epilepsy patients has been drastically changed forever,” said Dr. Steven. “It will never end because these surgeons will get old and they’ll train young surgeons and they’ll develop their own fellowship programs and their own training programs and, eventually, they’ll be training other countries. It’s an incredible feeling to be part of that.”

South Americans have a higher than average incidence of epilepsy, often caused by neurocysticercosis (a parasitic disease) or head trauma or obstetrical and perinatal problems. Some estimates cite the prevalence of epilepsy cases in Latin America at close to 18 per 1000 people. In contrast, Canadian estimates are 4-5 per 1000.

In about 30 per cent of cases, medication is ineffective at treating the disease. But until late 2011, Peruvians with medically-intractable epilepsy didn’t have other real options. Jorge Burneo, MD, MSPH, and David Steven, MD, FRCSC, helped change that by introducing to the country a consistent management plan and surgical treatment option for those patients.


Grant funds partnership between centres in London and Lima

Dr. Burneo is a neurologist at the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) and an associate professor at Western University. Dr. Steven is also an associate professor at Western and neurosurgeon at the LHSC. Together, they co-direct London’s Epilepsy Program.

In 2007, Dr. Burneo heard about the Partnering Epilepsy Centers in America program launched by the International League Against Epilepsy. He reached out to the Department of Epilepsy at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas [National Institute of Neurological Sciences] in his home country of Peru to see if they would be interested in partnering with his centre in Canada. They were. Dr. Burneo submitted a proposal, won a grant, and the rest is history.

“In Peru, there is relatively good neurological care but there is nothing specific to epilepsy,” said Dr. Burneo. “I thought it would be a good idea to share some of my knowledge.”


Drs. Steven and Burneo with some members of the Neurology team from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas.

Drs. Steven and Burneo with some members of the Neurology team from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas.


Foundational steps to introducing epilepsy surgery

Dr. Burneo visited Lima in 2008 to present on video-EEG: a crucial tool for determining epilepsy surgery candidates. The workshop drew about 80 health workers and led to the Ministry of Health’s agreement to purchase two video-EEG units (one for adults, one for pediatrics).

“Before, if you didn’t have the money, you would stay home and cross your fingers that at some point medication would improve the seizure frequency and severity. Surgery now provides a new hope,” said Dr. Burneo.

Dr. Burneo recruited Dr. Steven to help train, deliver workshops and presentations in the country, offer guidance on patient assessments and procedures, and ongoing mentorship.

“A successful epilepsy program is a multidisciplinary thing,” said Dr. Burneo.

“What we impressed on them was the importance of that total partnership,” said Dr. Steven. “[Epilepsy] is a problem that requires a neurologist to diagnose and surgery to treat. We all have to be on the same page and speaking the same language.”

As part of their foundational work to establish the program in Lima, the pair enabled visits by Peruvian physicians to their centre in London and helped develop institutional guidelines. At the same time, the national institute in Peru sponsored some of their physicians to do fellowships in Mexico and Brazil. That pooled learning helped propel the success of their epilepsy program: the prolonged use of video-EEG machines for diagnostics, the assessment of surgical candidates and, eventually, the first surgical treatments for epilepsy.

“We still go every year, to participate in the rounds and give talks. David goes into the OR to see how they do things and teach them new things, but we don’t do the work for them,” said Dr. Burneo.

“To be honest, they don’t need us now, which is the exact outcome that we wanted,” said Dr. Steven.

More details on this collaboration were published in Epilepsy & Behavior in 2013 (including a timeline of key events): “A collaborative effort to establish a comprehensive epilepsy program in Peru.


Future training plans in Peru and beyond

Peru has a three-tiered health system – public, social security and private – each with its own hospitals. To reduce the waiting list and defend the system from collapse, Dr. Burneo and Dr. Steven hope to help establish more epilepsy programs in the country, in different systems (consider, there are about 20 adult epilepsy beds in Ontario, but 1-2 in all of Peru).

Dr. Steven also mentioned the possibility of replicating this process in another country that lacks an epilepsy program, such as Bolivia.


A note on the article title: The theoretical air distance between Lima, Peru, and London, Ont., Canada, is between 6100-6143 km (based on their latitudes and longitudes). The actual flying distance would vary, depending on the location of each city’s airport and the selected travel route.

 

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MOC Tip of the Month

Amer Burhan, Region 3 CPD Educator

MOC Tip of the Month  -  Amer Burhan, Region 3 CPD Educator

“Are you travelling abroad for a conference this spring and wondering if it is eligible for Section 1 ‘accredited group learning’ credits under the MOC Program?

Under the MOC Program, accredited conferences are eligible for one credit per hour.

All live conferences and live workshops held outside of Canada must be developed by a university, academy, hospital, specialty society, physician organization or college in order to be automatically approved as an accredited group learning activity.

How do you know who developed your conference? Check the conference website to see if the developer fits the criteria described above.

If the conference has not been developed by a university, academy, hospital, specialty society, physician organization or college and the conference has not received industry funding, it could be recorded under Section 1 ‘unaccredited group learning’ for 0.5 credits per hour.

If you are unsure, feel free to send an email to the Royal College Services Centre staff at cpd@royalcollege.ca.”

Email Amer

Contact your local CPD Educator

Fellow readers, do you have a MOC tip that you would like to share with others?

Fellows, do you have a MOC tip that you would like to share with others? Contact communications@royalcollege.ca with your tip. If we use it, we will send you a free piece of merchandise from our Insignia collection.

 

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Your guide to Annual Dues (2016-2017)

Your guide to Annual Dues (2016-2017)

If you haven’t already done so, the deadline to renew your Fellowship for 2016-2017 is April 30, 2016. Dues notices were sent in early March. Pay your dues online.


 

Available on this page:

 
 

Fees for 2016-2017

Annual membership dues were approved at the Annual Meeting of the Members in February.


Fellows residing and practising in Canada

C$880

Fellows residing and practising outside of Canada

C$660

Long-Term Members - Active Fellows with 40 years of membership (dues are automatically adjusted for Fellows who qualify for this category)

C$220

Retired Fellows (as per Royal College definition)

No dues



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Five easy payment options:

  1. Pay your dues online using your credit card.

  2. Pay using online banking through most major financial institutions. Add the Royal College to your list of payees (Note: your account number is your Royal College ID).

  3. Call our secure payment line and pay by credit card at 1-800-668-3740 ext. 192 (toll-free) or 613-260-6192 (Ottawa region).

  4. Fax us at 613-730-8830.

  5. Send a cheque or money order to our mailing address payable to the “Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.”

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Receipts/confirmation of payment

Please use your 2016-2017 statement as your receipt of payment, for the purposes of reimbursement or documentation that you have paid in full. Note: Statements are emailed at the end of the month in which you paid.


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Fee reductions

You may qualify for a fee reduction for 2016-2017 if you meet one of the following criteria.


Projected net professional income between C$30,000 and C$110,000

C$440

Projected net professional income less than C$30,000

C$200

Anticipate a temporary leave for four months or longer for family or health reasons

C$440


To apply for a fee reduction, fill out the Request for fee reduction form online. You must initiate a request for a fee reduction and confirm your eligibility each year.

*Maintenance of Certification cycles may be affected based on the duration of family or health leaves. Please see the online Maintenance of Certification Cycle Adjustment form.


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New Fellows

As a new Fellow you might be thinking – didn’t I just pay my dues?

New members in 2015 would have been invoiced right after they joined with a pro-rated fee based on the months remaining in that fiscal year (ending March 31, 2016). The invoice you received in early March is for renewal for the 2016-2017 year at the full annual rate. 


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Royal College Diplomates/Diplomate Affiliates

Diplomates (to hold this status, you must also be a Royal College Fellow)

Fellows who graduate from a Royal College Area of Focused Competence (AFC-Diploma) program and enrol as a Royal College Diplomate pay an annual fee and may use the designation DRCPSC. Diplomates are charged on a pro-rated basis based on the date they complete their program. For the 2016-2017 fiscal year (April 1 - March 31), the fee is $250 (in addition to Fellowship dues).

Diplomate Affiliates(to hold this status, you must be enrolled in the MOC Program)

Non-Fellows who graduate from a Royal College Area of Focused Competence (AFC-Diploma) program and enrol as a Royal College Diplomate Affiliate will be charged on a pro-rated basis based on the date they complete their program. For the 2016-2017 fiscal year (April 1 – March 31), the fee is $250 (in addition to the MOC Program fees). MOC Program participation is a requirement of Diplomate Affiliate status. Diplomate Affiliates may use the designation DRCPSC.

For more information on these membership categories, please contact the Royal College Services Centre at 1-800-461-9598.


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Late fee starts on May 1, 2016

A late fee will be charged to you if payment is not received by the deadline, due to the high administrative costs associated with following-up on overdue accounts. Full details on the late fee can be found here.


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Contact us

If you have questions about annual dues, read our FAQ or contact our Finance Department at 1-800-668-3740, 613-730-8177 or finance@royalcollege.ca.

 

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Competency-based CPD – complete our quick poll

Competency-based CPD – complete our quick poll

Fellows: We want your input on a competency-based continuing professional development model that will be meaningful to your lifelong learning. Complete our four-question poll.


Feedback is for a special forum discussion

We are examining how assessment of competency, performance and patient outcomes will support/enable the design, development and implementation of a competency-based model for your lifelong learning.

In early May, we are hosting an Invitational Summit on Competency-based CPD. This interprofessional gathering will extend discussion on top themes like

Your input will be folded it into our forum discussion.


Take the poll here.


Our commitment to transparent communication

We will share the outcomes and decisions from this meeting after the summit. Look for details on our website, our social media channels and in a future Dialogue article.

We welcome your questions or comments at any time: cbd@royalcollege.ca.

For more information about our approach to competency-based education, please visit
http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/cbd/cbd-tools-resources-e.

 

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Founding member of MSF Canada wins our top humanitarian award

James Orbinski, OC, OOnt, MD,  MCFP

From characterizing the symptoms of HIV/AIDS in children, to enabling the delivery of affordable medicines to millions of people; the career of our 2016 Royal College Teasdale-Corti Humanitarian Award winner, James Orbinski, OC, OOnt, MD, MCFP, has had a wide-reaching impact.



“It’s a great honour to receive this award,” said Dr. Orbinski. “It also reminds me that the Royal College actively, openly and overtly acknowledges the centrality of a humanitarian ethos to the pursuit and the practice of medicine. And it is very much an honour for me to be part of that thinking.”


In the words of his nominators…

“Dr. Orbinski is a profile of courage. He exemplifies exceptionally what the Teasdale-Corti is all about. As physicians, we’re always looking for role models and he is an exceptional one. I think it’s important to bring to the Royal College knowledge of creative physicians who have done this. He has done many of the things that we would wish to do, but are unable to do.”

— Toronto cardiologist, Vivian Rambihar, MD, FRCPC

“James Orbinski is a Canadian icon and hero whose story profiles his courage and resolve to transform the world, even at great personal risk and sacrifice. His is an inspirational story and example for Canadian physicians and Fellows of the Royal College, particularly at this time of global humanitarian crises.”

Andrew L. Howlett, MD, FRCPC, psychiatrist and lecturer at the University of Toronto

“I first heard Dr. Orbinski speak at a screening of his documentary film Triage at Hart House at University of Toronto, and it was absolutely incredible. It blew everybody away, his humanity and his humility, and getting to hear him speak after that powerful documentary — it was just very inspirational.”

Sherryn Rambihar, MD, FRCPC, cardiologist at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto



Steve Simon/White Pine Pictures

Steve Simon/White Pine Pictures


Early years working with HIV-positive children in Africa

Today, Dr. Orbinski works in Waterloo, Ont., where he is CIGI Chair in Global Health Governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs. He is also a professor at Wilfrid Laurier University and at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

However, in the late 1980s, he was one of a few doctors working in Africa to characterize the signs and symptoms of HIV/AIDS in children. At that time, very little was known.

“Mothers would line up in the hundreds outside the hospital and many had walked for two or three days to get there, bringing their children to be seen and cared for,” said Dr. Orbinski. “The scale and scope of their need really struck me and I realized that a traditional approach was not going to work.”

He responded by developing treatment algorithms for very common problems in HIV-positive children: fever, diarrhea and cough. He taught those treatments to local health care providers so that children could still find relief after he left the region.


Humanitarian medicine in famine, war and genocide

Dr. Orbinski is perhaps best known for his many years working with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), first as a physician, then medical director, then head of mission.

This work was not easy — he was threatened at gunpoint in Somalia and survived shellfire in Rwanda during the 1994 genocide. Eventually, he became MSF’s international president and accepted the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999 on behalf of the organization.

Dr. Orbinski was also one of the founding members of MSF Canada, bringing it from “a spare desk in the basement” status to national recognition as a valuable member of the international MSF movement.

“In the spirit of the Teasdale-Corti award, Dr. Orbinski’s body of work has made a worldwide impact to the quality of frontline medical care and the sustainability of health systems in developing countries,” said Royal College CEO Andrew Padmos, MD, FRCPC.


Steve Simon/White Pine Pictures

Steve Simon/White Pine Pictures


Global impact and inspiration

In 2003, Dr. Orbinski helped create the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative with MSF. This organization has made a tremendous difference by developing and delivering drugs to millions of people suffering from neglected diseases. These are diseases such as paediatric HIV and sleeping sickness, for which current treatments are insufficient, too expensive or difficult to administer on the ground.

He also co-founded Dignitas International, a non-governmental organization that is removing barriers to health care access in developing countries. Thanks to Dignitas, more than 250,000 people in Malawi are on full treatment for HIV.

Acclaimed research by the Dignitas team is also credited with revolutionizing the treatment of pregnant women with HIV, thereby reducing transmission to their children.

Read more biographical details on Dr. Orbinski on our website. Dr. Orbinski and three other Royal College national award winners are also the focus of the March 2016 CEO Message.

 

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How well do you know our award recipients?

How well do you know our award recipients?

Using just five biographical details each, can you guess the winner in each award category? When you’ve made your guess, link to the winner’s biography and check your answer.


WINNER OF THE 2016 JAMES H. GRAHAM AWARD OF MERIT


1

While still a resident, he started the intensive care unit at Halifax’s Victoria General Hospital and was its initial director.

2

He is credited with bringing transplantation surgery to Atlantic Canada and laparoscopic procedures to Nova Scotia. He also established Halifax’s first Bariatric Surgery Program.

3

He has written over 200 scientific papers.

4

He once trained under Dr. Joseph E. Murray, who later won a Nobel Prize.

5

A Professor Emeritus at Dalhousie University, he remains actively involved with the school’s Department of Surgery.


And the winner is…


WINNER OF THE 2016 DUNCAN GRAHAM AWARD


1

A psychiatrist, he was a member of the team that planned and built the new Royal Ottawa Hospital in Ottawa.

2

He was recruited to British Columbia from Ontario in 2005, where he helped establish and lead tertiary mental health services for the province’s Interior Health Authority (IHA).

3

He was inducted as a member of the American College of Psychiatrists in 2013 and is on the editorial board for the Journal of Ethics in Mental Health.

4

He has been a Royal College examiner, surveyor and committee member. He currently chairs the specialty committee for his discipline.

5

Last year, he accepted the new role of program medical director for the Mental Health and Substance Use Program for the IHA of British Columbia.


And the winner is…


WINNER OF THE 2016 ROYAL COLLEGE AMS/DONALD RICHARDS WILSON AWARD


1

She received her training in Montreal, Toronto and south of the border in Michigan.

2

The author or co-author of over 55 peer-reviewed publications, she specializes in Acute Care Surgery, Trauma and Critical Care.

3

She was a member of the National Steering Committee on Resident Duty Hours, serving as chair of the Procedural/Surgical Disciplines Working Group.

4

She played a key role in Trauma General Surgery’s approval as a Royal College Area of Focused Competence (Diploma) Program.

5

She is director of one of the largest General Surgery residency training programs in the country.


And the winner is…

 

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New Royal College website to debut in May

New Royal College website to debut in May

The Royal College’s website is poised to change.

When you visit www.royalcollege.ca next month, you will experience a more modern website with some key changes:


Supporting you during this transition

To ensure a smooth transition, our staff will be ready to answer any questions you may have after the website changes over.

If you’ve bookmarked any of our current website pages, those links will change. We will make support tools available (for example, a list of new links for top pages so you can update your bookmarks). Robust search capabilities, mega-menus and category landing pages will also ensure it will be easier for you to find content on our new site.

We’re very excited for this update and to provide you with a better online experience!

 

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Celebrating Royal College volunteers – we couldn’t do it without you!

Celebrating Royal College volunteers – we couldn’t do it without you!

It’s National Volunteer Week, April 10-16, 2016. We want to take this opportunity to thank the almost 3,000 volunteers who contribute to the community of specialty medicine each year by participating in the work of the Royal College. We couldn’t do this work without you.

Our volunteers’ willingness to contribute almost always means time away from professional practice, other work or personal roles, and family. This contribution of time and talent is sincerely appreciated. We simply could not accomplish our goals without your contributions. Thank you!



Did you know?

 

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Bestselling author, Dr. Kaveh Shojania, headlines ICRE 2016

Bestselling author, Dr. Kaveh Shojania, headlines ICRE 2016

Twelve years ago, when Kaveh Shojania, MD, co-authored the bestselling book, Internal Bleeding: The Truth Behind America’s Terrifying Epidemic of Medical Mistakes, the quality improvement movement had only just begun to take shape in North America. Now an integral player in that movement, Dr. Shojania will share his experiences and expertise at this year’s International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE).

Dr. Shojania’s opening plenary takes place Thursday, September 29, 2016 (16:00 – 17:30) in Niagara Falls, Ont. Register now for ICRE 2016.

Kaveh Shojania, MD

Kaveh Shojania, MD


Plenary speaker hopes to propel systems-level thinking

“Traditionally in medicine, there has been such an impetus on knowing everything and being the most skillful technician you can possibly be, that if anything bad ever happens to a patient, it’s implied that you aren’t good and that it’s a personal failing,” said Dr. Shojania, a general internist and director of the Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety at the University of Toronto.

“You can only get so far by having a bunch of great individuals. You also need systems in place to support those individuals.”

This shift in thinking about systems of health care, rather than individuals alone, has begun to take hold in the quality and safety movement in North America. It’s a reframing that Dr. Shojania encourages.

“I think we now know what we have to do. The hope is that we’ll make a lot more progress over the next 10 to 15 years.”

Dr. Shojania’s plenary will draw from his extensive background, including as a former Canada Research Chair (2005–2013) and current editor-in-chief of BMJ Quality and Safety. He plans to outline what strides have been made in quality improvement in North American health care systems and what more needs to be done.

Visit the ICRE blog to read an extended Q&A with Dr. Shojania.


Register for ICRE 2016; early bird fees in effect

Join 1,600 colleagues from around the world in Niagara Falls, Ont., for the 2016 International Conference on Residency Education this September 29 – October 1.

www.royalcollege.ca/icre

The deadline for early bird registration is August 22, 2016.

 

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Record your best “rant” for the 2016 Simulation Summit

Record your best “rant” for the 2016 Simulation Summit

Are you passionate about simulation-based education? Then, submit a video “rant” for the 2016 Simulation Summit! The best ones will be presented at the conference.

Rants on any subject related to sim-based education and/or the challenges that educators, administrators and learners face, will be considered.

Download complete video “rant” guidelines and submission instructions.


Why rants?

The Royal College’s Simulation Summit is a unique, interactive and interprofessional event. This year’s theme, Extreme Sim, will push the envelope: cutting-edge programming that explores sim research and learning-in-practice in a wide spectrum of contexts/settings.

To create a collaborative environment, where complimentary (and conflicting) viewpoints are welcome and encouraged, the planning committee wants your best candid videos. Try and persuade other educators, researchers and health care professionals to see things your way on a particular medical simulation-related topic.

Submit your best “rant” by August 13, 2016.


Looking for inspiration?

Watch Dr. Glenn Posner’s lighthearted – yet educational – “rant” about simulation debriefing that was presented at the 2015 conference.

In his video testimonial, the seasoned simulation educator discusses how debriefing has evolved, shares  important tips and advice for the beginner-debriefer, and explains why aspiring debriefers should sign up for a Simulation Educator Training course.


IMPORTANT SUBMISSION DEADLINES

While you’re preparing your video “rant”, don’t forget to mark your calendar with these other important deadlines:

Visit www.royalcollege.ca/simulationsummit to find out more about this year’s conference in St. John’s, N.L., October 14-15, 2016.

 

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News bites – March 2016

News bites – March 2016

 

Available on this page:

 
 


It’s Annual Dues season

You’ve probably received an email notice. Maybe you’ve already paid. If not, this is a friendly reminder that Fellowship dues for 2016-2017 are due by April 30, 2016.

Visit http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/membership/dues-information-e for full details.

You can also check out our high-level dues guide in this month’s newsletter.


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Year in review: Embracing change, respecting tradition

Embracing change,  respecting tradition (our 2015 Annual Review) is now available  

Embracing change, respecting tradition (our 2015 Annual Review) is now available. This short publication highlights the scope of the Royal College’s work over the past year.

If you’re wondering what’s been keeping us busy, take a look: view or download a copy of the 2015 Annual Review »

Inside, you’ll find

Print copies are also available to Fellows and Resident Affiliates. Email communications@royalcollege.ca to request one.


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Clinician Scientists: helping to improve patient care

Clinician Scientists in Canada: Supporting  Innovations in Patient Care Through Research  

The Clinician Scientists in Canada: Supporting Innovations in Patient Care Through Research white paper is now available. It follows months of consultation with Fellows, faculties of medicine, clinicians and partner organizations like le Collège des médecins du Québec, the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada and the College of Family Physicians Canada.

Download the PDF version of the white paper and

For more information about the Clinician Scientist in Canada White Paper, please contact educationpolicy@royalcollege.ca.


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Stay up-to-date an all the CBD news

CBD Community Touchpoint gives you all the latest Competence by Design (CBD) news, including what’s coming next. Read the latest issue.

Top features from the March 2016 issue

Only three issues per year; subscribe today and get the next one sent right to your inbox.


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Be inspired by our 2016 National Award winners

Do you know who won major Royal College awards for 2016?

Our CEO released a new message on March 30. It announced the winners of four very prominent Royal College awards.

Get details on the winners in “Announcing our national award winners for 2016.” Or, if you feel like having a bit of fun first, try and guess our winners with only five hints each…


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In demand: expertise on global health ethics

Are you interested in issues related to medical ethics? Do you have particular knowledge in this area or know someone who does?

We’re still seeking proposals on issues related to global health to expand our online bioethics curriculum. (Proposals on other topics will also be considered).

For details and a list of suggested topics, visit http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/bioethics/call-for-proposals-e.


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Seats remain at our upcoming patient safety and QI workshop

Our ASPIRE (Advancing Safety for Patients in Residency Education) workshop will take place May 10-13, 2016, at the Royal College in Ottawa. Some spaces are still open. Reserve your place by April 26.

Practical and hands-on, participants at the workshop will be guided through the creation of a curriculum proposal related to patient safety, quality improvement (QI) and resource stewardship.

Visit http://www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/events/advancing-safety-patients-in-residency-education-aspire-e for full details.


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Social chatterFacebookTwitter


Top post (likes, comments, shares)

Top post (likes, comments, shares)


Top five tweets

Top five tweets

 

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Members in the news

Members in the news

 

Available on this page:

 
 


Advice, expertise and opinion

Daniel Birch, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery) and Rajdeep Padwal, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, General Internal Medicine) were filmed as part of a news segment on “the real cost of medical tourism.” Dr. Birch is medical director of the Centre for the Advancement of Minimally Invasive Surgery based at the Royal Alexandra Hospital. He is also an associate professor of Surgery at the University of Alberta, where Dr. Padwal is a professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine. Watch the segment on globalnews.ca »

Robert Ferrari, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) and Andrew Malleson, MD, FRCPC (Psychiatry) were quoted in a feature article about whiplash. Dr. Ferrari is the author of the book, The Whiplash Encyclopedia, and Dr. Malleson wrote Whiplash and Other Useful Illnesses. Dr. Ferrari is a consultant physician in Edmonton and clinical professor of Medicine at the University of Alberta. Dr. Malleson is a retired psychiatrist. Read more in The Atlantic »

Ian Mitchell, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics) commented on the high-profile case of an Alberta toddler’s recent death from meningitis. Dr. Mitchell is a paediatric respirologist with Alberta Children’s Hospital and a professor of Paediatrics at the University of Calgary. Read more in the National Post »


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Research, technology and innovation

Shahzeer Karmali, MD, FRCPC (General Surgery) is co-author of new research that estimates the costs to the Canadian health system to repair bariatric surgeries performed out-of-country (e.g. medical tourism). Dr. Karmali is a surgeon at the Royal Alexandra Hospital and associate professor, Division of General Surgery, at the University of Alberta. Read more in the National Post »

Fiona Kouyoumdjian, MD, FRCPC (Public Health and Preventative Medicine) is the author of a new report detailing the poor health of inmates in Canadian prisons. Dr. Kouyoumdjian is a postdoctoral fellow with the Centre for Research on Inner City Health of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Read more in the Globe and Mail »

Vivek Mehta, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery) performed a ground-breaking endoscopic cranial surgery 10 years ago, which was recently celebrated on its anniversary. Dr. Mehta is divisional director, Pediatric Neurosurgery, at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton. Watch the segment on globalnews.ca »  

James Shapiro, MD, FRCSC (General Surgery) and his team are testing the effectiveness of insulin implants to treat diabetes — the world’s first experiment with this form of therapy. Dr. Shapiro is director of the Clinical Islet Transplant Program in Edmonton, a transplant surgeon with Alberta Health Services and Canada Research Chair in Regenerative Medicine. Read more in the Edmonton Journal »

Duncan Stewart, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Cardiology) and Lauralyn McIntyre, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) are co-leading a research trial at The Ottawa Hospital on the use of cellular immunotherapy to treat septic shock. Dr. Stewart is executive vice president of Research at the hospital, and CEO and scientific director of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI). Dr. McIntyre is a critical care physician and senior scientist of the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the OHRI. Read more on cbc.ca »


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Profiles and achievement

Craig Campbell, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) was honored with the Dave Davis Research in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Award from the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education. This award recognizes individuals/groups that have made outstanding contributions to research in CME. Dr. Campbell is director of Continuing Professional Development at the Royal College.

Hugh Chaun, MBChB, FRCPC (Internal Medicine) is the recipient of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology’s Distinguished Service Award for 2016. Dr. Chaun is a clinical professor emeritus in the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia. Read more on the UBC website »

Louis Hugo Francescutti, MD, FRCPC, MSM (Public Health and Preventative Medicine) was honoured with a Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) by his Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston. A Past President of the Royal College, Dr. Francescutti is an Honorary Colonel of 1 Field Ambulance (Edmonton). He is also an Emergency Medicine physician at the Royal Alexandra Hospital and a professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta.

David Huntsman, MD, FRCPC (General Pathology) was awarded the first Gerald Award for Translational Research and Pathology from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Huntsman is a professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. He is also a staff pathologist at the BC Cancer Agency and consulting pathologist at the Vancouver General Hospital. Read more on the UBC website »

Erin Keely, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism) won the coveted Medicine Ball Award at a fun Dancing with the Docs gala dinner and fundraiser hosted by The Ottawa Hospital’s Department of Medicine. Numerous other Fellows participated in the dancing: Avi Chatterjee, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism); Nancy Dudek, MD, FRCPC (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation); Mitchell Sabloff, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Hematology); Yoko Schreiber, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases) and Jocelyn Zwicker, MD, FRCPC (Neurology). Read more in the Ottawa Citizen »

Rosemary G. Moodie, MD, FRCPC (Pediatrics) and her son, Dr. Jonathan Wong, both received 2016 African Canadian Achievement Awards of Excellence (ACAA) – the first time that family members have won in the same year. Dr. Moodie is an assistant professor in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Toronto and associate staff physician at the Hospital for Sick Children. She won the Excellence in Science Award; Dr. Wong won the Youth Achievement Award. Read more in the Jamaican Observer » (or on the ACAA website)

Poul Sorensen, MD, FRCPC (Anatomical Pathology) was awarded the Robert L. Noble Prize by the Canadian Cancer Society. Dr. Sorensen is a scientist at the BC Cancer Agency and a professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. Read more on the UBC website »

Paul Steinbok, MD, FRCSC (Neurosurgery) was awarded a Vice Chancellor’s Award from the University of West Indies, which recognizes people of Caribbean heritage who have made significant contributions. Dr. Steinbok, who was born in Barbados, is head emeritus of the Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery at the BC Children’s Hospital. Read more on the UBC website »

Eric Yoshida, MD, FRCPC (Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology) is the recipient of the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver’s Distinguished Service and Meritorious Achievement Award for 2016. Dr. Yoshida is a professor in the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver General Hospital. Read more on the UBC website »


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Congratulations to the 2016 CAME Certificate of Merit Award Recipients. Several Fellows were among this year’s winners:


Suggestions for “Member in the news” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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In memoriam

In memoriam

Christopher N. Best, MBBS, FRCPC, died on February 26, 2016, in Mississauga, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Best was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine (1959) and Nuclear Medicine (1980). He earned his medical degree from the University of London in 1950.

Weng K. Lai, MBChB, FRCSC, died on February 19, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 80. Dr. Lai was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1972. He earned his medical degree in 1965 from the University of Dublin, Trinity College. Known for his compassion and dedication, he worked in Windsor for more than 35 years. Read more about Dr. Lai »

Norman H. Gelpke, MBBS, FRCSC, died on February 8, 2016, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 88. Dr. Gelpke was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1961. He graduated from the University of London and did additional training in England, Canada and the USA. He served with commonwealth forces in Korea and had a long career as an orthopedic surgeon in Vancouver and New Westminster, B.C. Read more about Dr. Gelpke »

Allan Hugh McFarlane, MD, FRCPC, died on February 17, 2016, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 84. Dr. McFarlane was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1974. He enjoyed a 58 year career in medicine, including 44 years of service with the Department of Psychiatry at McMaster University. Read more about Dr. McFarlane »

Charles Arthur G. Armstrong, MBChB, FRCPC, died on January 22, 2016, in London, Ont., just shy of 92. Dr. Armstrong was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1969. Remembered for his humour, intelligence and determination, he completed his medical studies at Queen’s University Belfast in 1947. Read more about Dr. Armstrong »

Ronald David Kimberley, MD, FRCPC, died on January 10, 2016, in Kingston, Ont., at age 66. Dr. Kimberley was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1981. He practised in the Kingston area, often with young offenders. He founded Camp Outlook as a medical student — a wilderness program for youth, often referred from a social agency or school. The camp is still in operation and has had a wide impact. Read more about Dr. Kimberley »

Robert (Dr. Bob) Fraser M. Myers, MD, FRCPC, died on February 4, 2016, in Brandon, Man., at age 98. Dr. Myers was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1959. Service-oriented, he holds the distinction of having been the first pediatrician in Manitoba outside of Winnipeg. He was also a founder of the Brandon Clinic. Read more about Dr. Myers »

Roland Felix Lynch, MD, FRCPC, died on February 7, 2016, in Calgary, Alta., at age 96. Dr. Lynch was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1955. He completed his medical studies in his native Ireland, before later working in private practice in Calgary. He also worked in the Psychiatric Unit at Holy Cross Hospital. Read more about Dr. Lynch »

Edward George O’Brien, MDCM, FRCSC, died on February 12, 2016, in Kelowna, B.C., at age 88. Dr. O’Brien was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1957. A full life and career, he spent time in Whitehorse, Yukon; Montreal; Bristol, England; Fredericton, N.B.; and Vernon, Salmon Arm and Richmond, B.C. Read more about Dr. O’Brien »

Donald Victor Catton, CD, MD, FRCPC, died on February 9, 2016, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Catton was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1967. He was a professor of Medicine at McMaster University. He was also in private practice in Hamilton. From 1976-1981, he volunteered his time and expertise as a member of the Royal College Examination Committee on Anesthesiology. Read more about Dr. Catton »

Robert Cossette, MD, FRCSC, died on March 17, 2016, in Laval, Que., at age 77. Dr. Cossette was certified by the Royal College in Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery in 1970. For more than 35 years, he worked as a cardiac surgeon at l’Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal. He also volunteered with the Royal College Examination Committee for his specialty for eight years. Read more about Dr. Cossette »


Suggestions for “In memoriam” can be emailed to communications@royalcollege.ca.

 

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