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Want help Navigating Medical Emergencies?

Look no further than Navigating Medical Emergencies – An interactive guide to patient management.

We worked with experts from across Canada to develop this free e-book for Fellows working in acute care.


When your patient’s condition worsens and his or her life is at risk, your ability to recognize the signs and act promptly could be the difference between life and death.

But how do you prepare yourself for these situations before they happen?

Our new online guide has you covered.

Perfect for self-study or for use within a clinical setting, this e-book can help transform teamwork culture, improve patient safety and potentially save lives.

With this free e-book, you’ll learn

  • how to initiate resuscitation, use personal protective equipment, establish and maintain therapeutic relationships, and explore goals of care.
  • advanced measures to manage and support patients in respiratory failure and shock.
  • how to select, prioritize and sequence tasks when facing life-threatening situations.
  • relevant and common pharmaceutical interventions.
Start Navigating Medical Emergencies

Testimonials

“This is an outstanding example of the modern Critical Care textbook: online, filled with interactive care maps, videos and importantly peer reviewed for content. It will become a crucial resource for our rotating residents, subspecialty Critical Care Medicine trainees, attending Intensivists as well as all our non-MD colleagues who care for our patients and their families.” - Alison Fox-Robichaud, BSc, MSc, MD, FRCPC, professor in the Department of Medicine and staff physician, Hamilton Health Sciences

"Magnificent, unique, comprehensive, concise. Using electronic mental-maps is not only novel, it mimics clinical thinking. This resource is eminently useful whether novice or know-it-all. Clinical experts provided all the right ingredients, the evidence-base adds the perfect seasoning and it is served up by expert teachers: what a triumph; bon appétit." - Peter G. Brindley, MD, FRCPC, FRCP Edin, FRCP Lond, professor of Critical Care Medicine, Medical Ethics and Anesthesiology, University of Alberta


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MOC Tip of the Month – February 2018
By Glenn Posner, FRCSC

Visit a sim centre to reveal more Section 3 credit opportunities

MOC Tip of the Month

Glenn Posner

Simulation-based medical education has come a long way since I was a new Fellow. I used to have to champion its value to busy attending physicians; now, it’s widely accepted as a way to reduce preventable medical errors.

My MOC tip is about ways you can use your nearest simulation centre to improve your practice outcomes and claim Section 3 MOC credits. For inspiration, I’ll also share some of the creative ways specialists are using the University of Ottawa Skills and Simulation Centre (where I am Medical Director) for their continuing professional development (CPD).

(Stay tuned for another MOC tip, later this year, on what you can do if you don’t live near a sim centre.)

Four ways a sim centre can help you improve your practice

  1. Enhance your technical skills: Are you seeking expertise in a new clinical technique? Contact your local simulation centre and find out if they are running a course. You can use their space to practise in a safe learning environment with mannequins or cadavers. This is a very popular approach with surgeons.
  2. Evaluate your teaching skills: Do you teach at a simulation centre? Circulate evaluation forms at the end of your courses and get feedback from your learners. Or arrange for a trusted colleague to assess your teaching skills through direct observation. Whether you are teaching the course or running the debriefing session, invite them to watch you, evaluate your skills, and give you feedback at the end.
  3. Create an in-situ simulation: Do you want to bring a custom in-situ simulation into your own clinical environment? Simulation centre staff can help with advice and equipment. Sim centres are very experienced in creating scenarios for a wide variety of disciplines. If you get in touch with the centre’s medical director, he or she can help you plan a custom solution. I claim some of my Section 3 credits by learning through in-situ simulations in my department (Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Ottawa).
  4. If your department does not do simulation, champion it: Blaze a trail for your department! Engage with your local simulation centre and ask how you and your team can use simulation to assess your performance. Whether it’s designing a one-time scenario or an ongoing simulation curriculum, you can get involved, no matter your discipline.

In all of these examples, the time you spend reflecting on the feedback received on your performance during the simulation can be claimed for Section 3 Direct Observation credits (one hour = 3 MOC credits). Feedback can come from learners, colleagues, instructors, direct observers or debriefing sessions.

How different specialists use the sim centre

Here are some ways different specialists are using our simulation centre to claim their Section 3 credits:

  • Anesthesiology: The University of Ottawa’s Anesthesiology Department brought in staff anesthesiologists and had them do the same scenarios their residents had done. The staff anesthesiologists were then debriefed by junior faculty (who they most likely trained as residents). This has been one of the most innovative uses of a simulation centre for CPD I have ever seen.
  • Psychiatry: The psychiatrists run an annual CPD course on Electroconvulsive Therapy on a weekend that is very highly attended.
  • Internal Medicine: Internists use the simulation centre to brush up on their critical care skills and Advanced Cardiac Life Support protocols.
  • Orthopedic Surgery: Many weekends, there will be a huge ankle or knee course going on where orthopedic surgeons from across the country are brushing up on their arthroscopy.
  • Neurosurgery: We also host big Neurosurgery courses where neurosurgeons practise their techniques on cadavers in a lab.

I highly recommend you look up your nearest simulation centre and give them a call. Simulation is a great tool to use any time you’re looking to enhance teamwork or introduce a new technique, as it provides a very safe environment in which to learn new skills.


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Meet three physicians we’re investing in & preview their research

Two are tackling individualized assessments for the training of competent surgeons; the other, team performance in the operating room. All are hoping to leave their mark.

Meet our Robert Maudsley Fellowship for Studies in Medical Education recipients for 2018.

This fellowship helps specialists acquire knowledge and skills to develop educational programs, evaluation methods and research applicable to medical education. Recipients must be registered in a master’s-level or PhD-level university program in education or a program of study closely related to medical education.

This fellowship is one way the Royal College is investing in future leaders in specialty medical education research.

Preview their research questions

  • “The operating room (OR) is a complex and dynamic environment with multiple team members, learners and leaders,” said recipient Farhana Shariff, BSc, MDCM, FRCSC, Master of Health Professions Education Candidate, a clinical educator Fellow in the Division of General Surgery, Centre for Health Education Scholarship, University of British Columbia. “Crises in the OR are stressful, high-stakes events that require efficient and coordinated team performance….”
  • “Surgery is inherently a high risk field, requiring a diverse skillset,” said recipient Lauren Gordon, MD, MSc (Computer Science), PhD Candidate (Biomedical engineering) and resident physician, Division of Vascular Surgery at the University of Toronto. “As competency-based medical education is implemented in General and Vascular Surgery, it becomes increasingly important to determine what benchmarks to set to ensure competent surgical graduates….”
  • “Standardizing surgical education and training has the potential to reduce operative complications, leading to decreased patient morbidity and mortality, and reduced medical care costs….” said Alexander Winkler-Schwartz, MDCM, PhD Candidate (Neuroscience) and a neurosurgical resident at McGill University in Montreal.
  • Learn more about their work

    Visit our grant page. Gain a fuller understanding of our 2018 recipients’ research projects and how their work may impact the training of future specialists.


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Help us select our 2018 recipients: Mentor of the Year, Prix d’excellence – Specialist of the Year

MOC Tip of the Month

Nominations are due Friday, March 9, 2018, for this year’s

  • Mentor of the Year and
  • Prix d’excellence – Specialist of the Year awards.

If you have a deserving colleague, please consider nominating him or her for one of these prestigious honours. These awards are presented each year to recipients from each of our five regions (up to 10 awards in total).

Not sure which region you belong to? Visit our Regional Advisory Committee (RAC) homepage to find out.

About these regional awards

The Mentor of the Year award was established to recognize Fellows of the Royal College who have had a significant impact on the career development of students, residents and/or colleagues. The award is open to all Fellows of the Royal College working in any practice setting (e.g. private practice, community or academic).
Learn more or submit a nomination »

The Prix d’excellence – Specialist of the Year award was established to recognize Fellows of the Royal College who have made significant contributions in providing outstanding care to their patients, and outstanding service to the community in which they practice. The nominee must be a role model for excellence in patient care. The award is open to all Fellows of the Royal College working in any practice setting.
Learn more or submit a nomination »

Questions: Please email awards@royalcollege.ca


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Research funding: Apply by March 8, 2018

Applications are due Thursday, March 8, 2018, for two categories of Royal College research grants:

  • Medical Education Research Grant (MERG), and the
  • Royal College/Associated Medical Services (AMS) CanMEDS Research Development Grant.

If you are a medical educator or fulltime researcher, please consider applying for one of these competitive grants.

Note: To be eligible, a Royal College Fellow must contribute to the research project.

About these research grants

The Medical Education Research Grant supports quality research in Canada that will advance the field of postgraduate medical education or continuing professional development. This grant is valued between $5,000 and $50,000 per project.
Learn more or submit an application »

The Royal College/AMS CanMEDS Research Development Grant supports research development or implementation of projects that advance competency-based training and assessment for specialists. This year’s special call-to-caring seeks proposals that advance compassion and caring as realized through the intrinsic CanMEDS roles, in order to realize the mission of social accountability in the training and continuing professional development of specialists. This grant is valued at up to $25,000 per project.
Learn more or submit an application »

Questions: Please email researchgrants@royalcollege.ca


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Members in the news


"We have been able to make compounds that target that particular protein which is found much more in people with Alzheimer's disease, almost 10 times more," Sultan Darvesh, MD, FRCPC (“Discovery at Dalhousie brain tissue lab could lead to Alzheimer treatment,” CBC News).

"The whole idea of the ex-vivo preservation strategy is not so much just to be able to assess organs, which I think is an important short-term goal, but really the idea is can we make better organs? Can we actually end up transplanting an organ that is better than the way that we found it?” Shaf Keshavjee, MD, FRCSC (“Donor kidneys revitalized for transplant at Toronto General Hospital,” CBC News).

“The itchiness is so severe that people who come back from the Tropics in the winter, one of the ways they get rid of the itching is they run outside and put their feet in the snow,” Jay Keystone, MD, FRCPC (“Hookworm-related skin infection a risk with travel to tropics: expert,” Roundhouse Radio 98.3 Vancouver).

“Mental health literacy is the foundation for mental health promotion, prevention and best available care,” Stan Kutcher, MD, FRCPC (“STAN KUTCHER: Let’s talk about how our culture compounds mental health crises,” Chronicle Herald).

"This is really improving, for me personally as a specialist, the type of patients that I see in my clinic. It's weeding out all the patients that don't need to be seen face-to-face, and so I'm doing more appropriate work in the hospital," Lillian Lai, MD, FRCPC (“The doctor will email you now: CHEO pilot reduced unnecessary referrals,” CBC News | Ottawa).

“We felt we had to try. She compelled me — she compelled all of us — to go above and beyond for her,” Toni Zhong, MD, FRCSC (“A Toronto doctor promised to help this acid attack survivor. One year later, she’s leaving Toronto with a new esophagus,” Toronto Star).

“It’s stupid for a woman in Canada to have no problems, while a woman in a developing country goes through hell. One baby is too many,” Alvin Zipursky, MD, FRCPC (“She was ‘the woman who loses all the babies.’ Then she learned what might have saved them,” Toronto Star).

Honours and recognition

Joseph Mikhael, MD, FRCPC, has been named chief medical officer of the International Myeloma Foundation.

Eight Fellows received appointments to the Order of Canada in late 2017.

  • Paul W. Armstrong, OC, MD, FRCPC
  • Elizabeth Ann Eisenhauer, OC, MD, FRCPC
  • Thomas Erskine Feasby, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Howard Vance Gimbel, CM, MD, FRCSC, AOE
  • Martin Edwin Gleave, CM, MD, FRCSC
  • Ivan Barry Pless, OC, MD, FRCPC
  • Kathleen Isabel Pritchard, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Eric Schloss, CM, MD, FRCPC

2017 Intensive Care Society Travelling Fellowship Award presented to Professor Peter Brindley, MD, FRCPC, by the Princess Royal, at the State of the Art 2017, Liverpool, 2017.


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In memoriam

Stethoscope

William Hugh Ainslie, MD, FRCSC, died on December 14, 2017, in Niagara Falls, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Ainslie was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1961. Read more about Dr. Ainslie.

Dean David Bell, MD, FRCPC, died on December 3, 2017, in Winnipeg, Man., at age 58. Dr. Bell was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1989. Read more about Dr. Bell.

Michael H.J. Bense, MBChB, FRCSC, died on December 12, 2017, in St. John’s, N.L., at age 70. Dr. Bense was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1986. Read more about Dr. Bense.

Basilon Cole, MD, FRCSC, died on November 10, 2017, in New Glasgow, N.S., at age 71. Dr. Cole was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1985. Read more about Dr. Cole (and a local news tribute).

Conway Joseph Don, MBBS, FRCPC, died on November 23, 2017, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 94. Dr. Don was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1958. Read more about Dr. Don.

George William A. Dyke, MD, FRCPC, died on December 8, 2017, in Mississauga, Ont., at age 65. Dr. Dyke was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1981. Read more about Dr. Dyke.

John Munroe Ferguson, MDCM, FRCSC, died on November 6, 2017, in Beaconsfield, Que., at age 90. Dr. Ferguson was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1958. Read more about Dr. Ferguson.

Jacques Genest, MD, FRCPC, died on January 5, 2018, in Montreal, Que., at age 98. Dr. Genest was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1945. Read more about Dr. Genest.

Veronica Halmos, MD, FRCPC, died on December 27, 2017, in North York, Ont., at age 88. Dr. Halmos was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1960. Read more about Dr. Halmos.

Gerald Arthur Hanks, MD, FRCSC, died on January 2, 2018, in Port Williams, N.S., at age 92. Dr. Hanks was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1965. Read more about Dr. Hanks.

James Anthony J. Hartford, MD, FRCPC, died on January 5, 2018, in London, Ont., at age 67. Dr. Hartford was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1984. Read more about Dr. Hartford.

Neville Clegg Jones, MD, FRCSC, died on November 17, 2017, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 96. Dr. Jones was certified by the Royal College in Plastic Surgery in 1962. Read more about Dr. Jones.

Lawrence Lacey, MD, FRCPC, died on November 26, 2017, in Richmond Hill, Ont., at age 74. Dr. Lacey was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology in 1974.

Francis K. Lee, MD, FRCPC, died on November 5, 2017, in North York, Ont., at age 57. Dr. Lee was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1998. Read more about Dr. Lee.

William Robert J. Martin, MD, FRCSC, died on December 26, 2017, in Galiano Island, B.C., at age 90. Dr. Martin was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1962. Read more about Dr. Martin.

James Patrick McAuley, MD, FRCSC, died on December 28, 2017, in London, Ont., at age 61. Dr. McAuley was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1985. Read more about Dr. McAuley.

Eva Susan McMaster, MD, FRCPC, died on December 31, 2017, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 108. Dr. McMaster was certified by the Royal College in Public Health in 1956. Read more about Dr. McMaster.

Jean-Marc Pépin, MD, FRCPC, died on December 22, 2017, in Sherbrooke, Que., at age 87. Dr. Pépin was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1959. Read more about Dr. Pépin.

Anthony Petrasek, MD, FRCPC, died on December 8, 2017, in Etobicoke, Ont., at age 92. Dr. Petrasek was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology in 1960. Read more about Dr. Petrasek.

Francis Hewetson Prouse, MD, FRCSC, died on December 4, 2017, in Mississauga, Ont., at age 95. Dr. Prouse was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1957. Read more about Dr. Prouse.

Jules Racicot, MD, FRCSC, died on November 29, 2017, in Lévis, Que., at age 87. Dr. Racicot was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1961. Read more about Dr. Racicot.

Charles Robert Rally, MDCM, FRCPC, died on November 16, 2017, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 89. Dr. Rally was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1957. Read more about Dr. Rally.

Peter Rosenbaum, MDCM, FRCSC, died on October 28, 2017, in Montreal, Que., at age 91. Dr. Rosenbaum was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1960. Read more about Dr. Rosenbaum.

Luis Carreno-Segura, FRCPC, FRCSC, died on December 1, 2017, in Etobicoke, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Carreno-Segura was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1958. Read more about Dr. Carreno-Segura.

David Arnold Stinson, MD, FRCPC, died on November 5, 2017, in Antigonish, N.S., at age 92. Dr. Stinson was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1957. Read more about Dr. Stinson.

Jerzy Szeps, FRCPC, FRCSC, died on November 22, 2017, in Baden, Ont., at age 91. Dr. Szeps was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1967. Read more about Dr. Szeps.

Yves Tessier, MD, FRCPC, died on November 18, 2017, in Quebec, Que., at age 76. Dr. Tessier was certified by the Royal College in Cardiology in 1970. Read more about Dr. Tessier.

Edemariam Tsega, MDCM, FRCPC, died on January 1, 2018, in Hamilton, Ont., at age 79. Dr. Tsega was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1970. Read more about Dr. Tsega.

Jean Veilleux, MD, FRCPC, died on October 28, 2017, in Quebec, Que., at age 87. Dr. Veilleux was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1961. Read more about Dr. Veilleux.

Guy Roger West, MD, FRCPC, died on December 3, 2017, in Calgary, Alta., at age 82. Dr. West was certified by the Royal College in Neurology in 1972. Read more about Dr. West.

Lawrence Allen Wilson, MD, FRCSC, died on December 18, 2017, in Okanogan, B.C., at age 69. Dr. Wilson was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1979. Read more about Dr. Wilson.

Brian K. Wolfe, MD, FRCPC, died on November 10, 2017, in Duncan, B.C, at age 60. Dr. Wolfe was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1987. Read more about Dr. Wolfe.

Richard (Dick) Wylie, MD, FRCSC, died on December 31, 2017, in St. Thomas, Ont., at age 78. Dr. Wylie was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1969. Read more about Dr. Wylie.


 

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