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7 books to carry you through the summer

There are a little less than seven weeks until the Labour Day weekend. Are you looking for some books to carry you through the rest of summer? Look no further! Here are seven book recommendations submitted by your colleagues.

What is the best book you’ve recently read? We’d love to hear! Email us at communications@royalcollege.ca


Seven books for seven weeks

  1. WEEK 1: The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown)

    “Meticulous and sweeping, read it before it becomes a two-hour movie.” - J. Walker, general surgeon
  2. WEEK 2: Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark T. Sullivan (Lake Union Publishing)

    “Fascinating and gripping book about a family in Milan during WW2 who resisted the Nazis, and specifically about one of their sons and what he did at age 18. A true story that had never been told before. Unusual to read about Northern Italy during WW2.” - Andrew Menkes, MD, FRCPC, FAAD, dermatologist in Mt View, California
  3. WEEK 3: The Hundred Secret Senses by Amy Tan (Ivy Books)

    “A well-told narrative that looks at the meaning of cultural identity and the difficult nature of our familial relationships. Adds a flavour of otherworld mysticism to spice things up.” - Vami Rajeswaran, MD, PGY3 Internal Medicine, Toronto
  4. WEEK 4: Snow Falling On Cedars by David Guterson (Vintage)

    “On the surface this is a murder mystery, however it touches on the influence of prejudice on the justice system. It deals with the lasting effects of the internment of the Japanese during the Second World War. It is a highly descriptive novel and beautifully written.” - Doug Hedden, MD, FRCSC, executive director, Professional Practice and Membership, Royal College
  5. WEEK 5: A Deadly Operation (a.k.a. The Karamanov Equations) by Marshall Goldberg (Dufour Editions)

    “A great medical mystery and he's written several; Critical List is another good one.” - M. Jason MD, FRCS, Am Bd, urologist in Winnipeg, Manitoba
  6. WEEK 6: Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese (Knopf)

    “It touches your humanity with its powerful writing and holistic content: global medicine interwoven with themes of love, friendships, parenting, family life, religion, politics and sacrifice. It takes your emotions on a roller coaster ride; you will never forget it.” - Allan Jeffrey Hunt, MBBS, FRCPC, pathologist, Ontario Forensic Pathology Service

    ***A popular novel, this book was also submitted for our 2017 summer reading list.
  7. WEEK 7: Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin (St. Martin’s Press)

    “Between stories of the war in Iraq and professional consulting in the business world, this book reports concepts of leadership and extreme responsibility - two values very present in medicine.” - Jacinthe Lampron, MD, FRCSC, trauma surgeon at the Ottawa Hospital

Please note: All items in this list are recommendations submitted by Fellows; their appearance in this list does not constitute endorsement of the books and/or their contents by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Looking for more book recommendations?

Check out our 2017 summer reading list for more selections recommended by your colleagues. The New York Times also recently published its summer reading recommendations.

Related: A twist on history, retired radiologist pens historical mystery

Related: Canada’s infectious past: B.C. specialist brings the facts to life


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Summertime MOC – claim credit for these common activities!

MOC Tip of the Month

♫ Summertime, and the livin’ is easy ♫

We know that your continuing professional development continues all year long, some of you might even have more time for learning right now due to a quieter practice in the summer months. Here are some tips for incorporating self-learning into your summertime schedule (without detracting too much from some much-needed relaxation).

You are probably already doing some of these activities, so don’t forget to claim them for MOC credit!

  • Immerse yourself in summer journal reading: Reading journal articles can take a considerable amount of time. Whether you’re relaxing at the cottage or lounging in the backyard, catching up on practice-based literature is a summertime pleasure for many (Journal Reading; two credits/issue or one credit/article).
  • Catch up on manuscript writing: Summer is also a good time to write that manuscript you may have been putting off or that grant application you would like to resubmit. The time you spend critically appraising medical literature on your research topic can count towards a Personal Learning Project (PLP) (two credits/hour). You can also claim the time you spend considering lines of enquiry, framing a research question and generating a hypothesis.
  • Get a head start on program or curriculum development: Give some thought to the fall term ahead. Often, major curriculum changes follow an accreditation review. Alternatively, your discipline may be revising specialty-specific standards in preparation for the switch to competency-based medical education. Summer is an excellent time to develop curricula, programs and other educational initiatives before committees reconvene in the fall (Curriculum Development; 15 credits/year).
  • Reflect on your evaluations (to add some Section 3 credits): Review your formal teaching evaluations or the feedback peer reviewers have sent you on a manuscript you submitted for publication. Summer is the perfect time to reflect on this feedback and create a plan of action, which may include even more continuing professional development (Practice Assessments; three credits/hour). You can also take our two new online self-assessment programs.
  • Enjoy a book: You never know where inspiration can hit. Books (fiction and nonfiction) can often inspire ideas for a Personal Learning Project (PLP) (two credits/hour). For example, a dialogue between two characters might stimulate reflection on how you might improve your mastery of CanMEDS Roles like Communicator and Professional. Or, a biography of a leader might inspire you to develop some new leadership competencies.

Looking for something to read? Check out our 2018 and 2017 summer reading lists — recommendations submitted by your colleagues.

Reading, manuscript writing, curriculum development and reflecting on your evaluations are all effective ways to keep on top of your MOC over the summer. If you have other recommendations for summer MOC activities, please email communications@royalcollege.ca – we’d love to hear your ideas and share them with the whole Fellowship!


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A twist on history, retired radiologist pens historical mystery

This article has been translated from French. Please note that Dr. Nicolas’ novel is presently only available in its language of origin.

Dr. Éric Nicolas, FRCPC, a radiologist retired from l’Hôpital Honoré Mercier in Saint-Hyacinthe, Que., believes that there is a lot of life to be lived after retirement. He has directed some of his own newfound time and energy into becoming a published novelist.

Dr. Nicolas is the author of Le secret perdu des Jésuites Tome I : Charland et les guerres américaines, a historical novel that tells the true tale of a mysterious Canadian who opposed the American invasions of 1775 and 1812.

We reached out to Dr. Nicolas to learn more about his novel and writing process.

Book cover
  1. What inspired you to write this particular book?
  2. In 2002, I discovered a medal awarded to a soldier in June 1815 for his participation in the Battle of Waterloo in the ranks of the British Army. The recipient of this medal was a French-Canadian from Montreal who died in 1813, almost two years before the battle. This intrigued me a lot and I did some research that led to the writing of this book. It is a 604-page historical novel that provides answers to the mystery of Louis Charland, the name of this mysterious character at the origin of my historical novel. This person really existed and was born in 1772; as for the date of his death, you’ll have to read the book to learn more. Was he really dead? Fiction or reality? It’s for the reader to judge…

  3. How long did you spend researching before beginning your book?
  4. My research began in 2002 and continues today. In fact, my book that was published in 2017 is the first in a trilogy. I am currently writing volume II.

  5. What do you spend more time developing: characters or plot?
  6. Neither because the characters in this book really existed and the historical events evoked in the book are authentic.

  7. Which passage/section in the book are you most proud of?
  8. The notebooks of Louis Charland, the protagonist of the book; these mysterious notebooks were discovered in 2014 in a secret cache of a building in old Montreal where Charland had hidden them. What one learns about this forgotten character disrupts the official historiography.

  9. What did you edit out of this book?
  10. As I published the memoirs recovered from another person, I did not cut out any detail. Whether historical, fantastic, irreverent, sordid, inconceivable, strange or even erotic, I left them, for the sake of authenticity and respect for freedom of expression, so dear to authors.

  11. Have you written other books and/or do you plan to?
  12. In 2013, I wrote and published a 500-page historical essay entitled, “Les Voltigeurs canadiens héros oubliés de la guerre de 1812.” I am currently writing volume II of Le secret perdu des Jésuites, which is quite advanced; I plan to publish it in the first quarter of 2019. I have also written another novel, which will probably be published after my trilogy that will tell the story of Louis Charland’s evolution through our history.

  13. Does writing energize or exhaust you?
  14. It undeniably energizes me. Writing involves me in foreign worlds and it’s exciting because it’s a bit like living other lives through the characters in the book. It is an exhilarating and very personal feeling that only reading allows you to feel, but with many nuances.

  15. Which authors do you like reading most/inspire you?
  16. J.R.R. Tolkien for the Lord of the Rings, J.K. Rowling for Harry Potter and Georges Simenon for his collection of work; but I like books in general, all authors and genres. Is it not said that books are the only friend who will never betray you?

  17. How did publishing your book change your process of writing?
  18. In publishing volume I, I wanted to present our history in a different way than we learn from our studies and by reading traditional history books. Perhaps young people lose interest in history because it does not connect to them. I try to reach a wide audience by presenting, above all else, the story of people above that of history, as such; the little story in the big, somehow; another way of seeing.

  19. How many hours a day do you write?
  20. It depends on the day. I work on my texts almost every day but the exact time dedicated to this work is not important. I’ve been a medical specialist all my life and now that I'm retired, I’m enjoying every precious moment that it brings me, but now I'm taking my time… In closing, I would like to mention to my Royal College medical colleagues that the medical career is exciting and wonderful but that retirement from the medical world is not the end of anything but the beginning of another chapter that now entirely belongs to you. Happy reading!

For more details on Dr. Nicolas’s book or its availability, please email him at enicolas@cgocable.ca.


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Canada’s infectious past: B.C. specialist brings the facts to life

Have you lived through a Canadian outbreak?

Dr. Nevio Cimolai, FRCPC, is the author of The Great Canadian Outbreaks. This collection of short stories mixes fact and fiction in its depiction of 10 infectious outbreaks in various regions and times in Canada’s history.

Dr. Cimolai is a medical microbiologist. He has been affiliated with the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and the Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia for over three decades.

We reached out to him to learn more about his novel and writing process.

Book cover
  1. What inspired you to write this particular book?
  2. Infectious outbreaks are common events in Canada, as they are throughout the world. I was initially intending to write a purely academic book on historical outbreaks in our country but soon realized that the scope would be considerable and that the readership would be considerably restricted. Given the role of the general community in the outbreak setting, it seemed that a broad audience would give the subject more visibility — and appropriately so.

  3. How long did you spend researching before beginning your book?
  4. Most of the scientific aspects of the subject matter were well-known to me. Each short story required some focused review of the times and places. Several of the incidents were known to me firsthand.

  5. What did you spend more time developing: characters or plot?
  6. The approach to each short story was never the same. They individually evolved in a very unique fashion. The plots were historically based for the large part, but the characters were fictional. I took liberty with character development so that the lay public would perhaps buy into the events; the latter accounts for some of the “stretching” of characters and actions.

  7. Which passage/section in the book are you most proud of?
  8. I have a kinship with each and every story.

  9. What did you edit out of this book?
  10. A major part of the initial editing, related to maintaining a concise book.

  11. Have you written other books and/or do you plan to?
  12. Essentially, all of my other publications have been in the mainstream of academics, whether in scientific or medical journals and books.

  13. Does writing energize or exhaust you?
  14. It required more energy to write on topics with which I had less familiarity.

  15. Which authors do you like reading most/inspire you?
  16. I was historically inspired by the pragmatist and philosophical English writers. If I could choose the two most influential, they would be Robert Browning and George Eliot (a.k.a. Mary Ann Evans). Nevertheless, the latter are far removed from my writing.

  17. How did publishing your book change your process of writing?
  18. Whereas a major purpose of writing was to give the lay audience some understanding of outbreaks, many of the short stories allowed me to capture some essential medical history (Canadiana) in the field of infectious disease and medical microbiology. For example, the scientific and pioneering work in Canada relating to verotoxigenic E. coli (“hamburger disease”) is our specialty’s equivalent of the Banting and Best story. The creativity of this writing, despite the mixed fact and fiction, was a venture several steps away from purely factual-based science.

  19. How many hours a day do you write?
  20. The writing was quite simply an enjoyable hobby and took place at home, abroad and during air flight. Some of the short stories could have easily achieved citizenship in several different countries during the time of writing. The writing milieu was never the same for any two stories.

For more details on the book or its availability, please email Dr. Cimolai at greatcanadianoutbreaks@gmail.com


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Highlights from the June 2018 Royal College Council Meeting

Royal College Council met from June 21-22. Highlights from their meeting include the approval of a new strategic plan and, on National Indigenous Peoples Day, a renewed commitment to Indigenous health through the approval of an updated Indigenous Health and Values Principles Statement.

Keep reading for more details on


Strategic Plan 2018-2020

Our 2018-2020 Royal College Strategic Plan titled, “Better education, Better care,” was formally approved by Council. The plan consists of four strategic priorities centered on serving patients and populations, and rests on a foundation of responsible stewardship. The strategic plan will be supported by an operational plan that prioritizes and defines strategic initiatives. Progress against these initiatives will be tracked and reported to Council quarterly and will cover performance measures and metrics, risks and mitigations, and overall status.

Royal College International

Royal College International (RCI), first incorporated in 2010, is a non-profit registered charity and subsidiary of the Royal College. RCI has now achieved moderate financial success. Its continued growth requires judicious support. As part of this support, external consultants were engaged to help with a governance review. At the June Council meeting, Council members reviewed the revised RCI governance framework and leadership model developed by management in consultation with the RCI Board, and the Royal College Executive Committee and Governance Committee.

Informed by the adage “form follows function,” Council discussed in small groups the proposed model and provided guidance to management. Based on the feedback, more details of the proposed model will be developed over the summer for review by the RCI Board in September and by Council in October.

Indigenous Health Values and Principles Statement (2018)

Council members unanimously approved the 2nd edition of the Indigenous Health Values and Principles Statement (2018). The 2nd edition takes into account changes to the Indigenous health landscape since the original statement was approved in 2013.

Council was also updated on the initiative to incorporate Indigenous health as a mandatory component of postgraduate medical education since the recommendation was approved by Council in October 2017. The Office of Health Systems Innovation and External Relations and the Office of Specialty Education are collaborating with the Indigenous Health Advisory Committee to draft the implementation plan. Broad stakeholder engagement will include residents and medical students, among others, and will unfold once the implementation plan is sufficiently developed.

Competence by Design

Council heard that the Competence by Design (CBD) initiative has achieved an important level of momentum with a number of programs and members of the postgraduate medical education (PGME) community very engaged. Eight speciality or subspecialty disciplines have now begun the implementation of CBD.

Council was informed that a number of stakeholders are very interested in the financial and resource impact of CBD. Management is looking at ways to expedite improved data and understanding in this area. The Committee on Health Workforce (a standing committee that reports to the federal, provincial and territorial Conference of Deputy Ministers of Health) is one such group that has recently requested information about the costs and funding of CBD.

Council observed that this outreach from the Committee on Health Workforce, and attendance of Royal College staff at a recent CHW meeting, has opened important lines of communication between the Royal College and the provincial health ministries. Additionally, Council also noted the need for augmented communications with faculty deans and PGME deans.

Academic Certification Policy

Council approved an updated Academic Certification Policy. The Royal College academic certification program is intended to assist Canadian faculties of medicine and universities in the recruitment of exceptional international specialists through a special route to Royal College Certification. The 2018 policy revisions clarify eligibility for this certification route, as well as roles and responsibilities during the application process. These revisions will help ensure better understanding of the policy among deans and Royal College committees.

Specialty workforce and employment study

The Royal College has recently launched the 2nd edition of the Medical Workforce Knowledgebase (MWK). Council members were provided an overview of Canada’s workforce in relation to international benchmarks and asked to provide comment on emergent themes in the data. Council recognized the importance of this work; discussion centred on the requirement for a sensitive approach to the dissemination of this data, as it may be easy to misconstrue without sufficient context.

Update on Council task forces

Council heard updates on three task forces:

  • The Task Force on Research and Scholarship (first convened in spring 2017) gave a progress report on its work to date. The task force presented its early observations and asked for feedback. They expect to make a final report in spring 2019.
  • The terms of reference for the Task Force on Periodic Reaffirmation of Professional Competence (described in March 2018 Dialogue) were presented to Council and approved. The expected duration of this task force is 12–18 months.
  • The terms of reference for the Task Force on the Disruptive Role of Technology on Medical Education and Health Care (also described in the March 2018 Dialogue) are still in development. The expected duration of this task force is 12–18 months.

Responsible stewardship

Management developed and presented to Council a revised three-year financial forecast. The forecast included a number of expense reduction measures and a cumulative $3 million reduction in the 2018/2019 operating budget. While the expense reductions were spread across a number of operational functions, notable areas of attention were recruitment and travel. Moreover, Council held a lengthy discussion of examination and credential fees. At the heart of this discussion was the question of whether exams should be self-financing or subsidized by Fellowship dues in recognition of the financial challenges experienced by examinees. After much consideration, Council approved increases in examination and credential fees for 2019-2020, linked to an annual cost of living index. This decision will be reviewed on an annual basis. The 2019-2020 fee schedule will be published in early fall.

Appointment of a new Councillor

Council appointed Taryn Taylor, MD, PhD, FRCSC, to fill the mid-term vacancy on Council in Region 3, Division of Surgery, until February 2019. At that time, she will be eligible for election to Council by the members in 2019 for a four year term. Looking ahead to the 2019 Council elections, Council also approved a new edition of the Council skills matrix that will inform the Nominating Committee about current and desirable Council skills as it recruits new Councillors to fill pending vacancies.

The next Royal College Council meeting will take place from October 24-25, 2018.

Questions relating to Council activities can be directed to governance@royalcollege.ca


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Members in the news

Doctor walking down a hospital hallway

“The job of the angioplasty balloon is to dilate the artery to get it to open up; this one is to just occlude the artery and block the flow (with) the balloon so you stop bleeding,” Andrew Beckett, MD, FRCSC (“New device already saving lives at Montreal's MUHC,” CBC News).

“We'd like to generate interest among Canadians. We want our next food guide to be based on evidence,” Miriam Berchuk, MD, FRCPC (“Why you can't put down those barbecue chips,” CBC News).

“Critical care advances have saved many lives, but we cannot allow the existence of technological care to prevent us from knowing when someone has died,” Sonny Dhanani, MD, FRCPC (“Opinion: Why we need a clear definition of when death occurs,” The Globe and Mail).

“Generally speaking, the infectious risk for needles found in the community is much less than we see with occupational needlesticks, for example…. Sunlight and other environmental conditions degrade viruses that are living in the needles,” Nick Etches, MD, FRCPC (“No easy answer for opioids,” Lethbridge Herald).

“We obviously have to be more sensitive in how we report people’s deaths and be aware of the effect it can have,” Sidney Kennedy, MBChB, FRCPC (“Anthony Bourdain's and Kate Spade's suicides highlight grim reality of mental illnesses that don't discriminate,” Ottawa Citizen).

“The question is really how bad does [sleep/sleep quality] need to be before you start to see those occurring, and is there a long-term effect on children?” Piush Mandhane, MD, FRCPC (“Short sleep, snoring may affect infants' learning skills: University of Alberta study,” Edmonton Journal).

“No one country or one group of academics or researchers is going to figure it out all on their own,” Howard Njoo, MD, FRCPC (“A century-old cure may help ward off superbugs, the ‘global climate change of health’,” CTV News).

“I believe we have scientific evidence and evidence from other jurisdictions that would suggest this different approach, a more public health approach to drug policy, is at the very least worth trying,” Eileen de Villa, MD, FRCPC (“Chief medical officer calls for decriminalization of all drugs for personal use,” Toronto Star).

“The bottom line is most of the next emerging pathogens will be totally unpredictable,” Theresa Tam, MD, FRCPC (“‘You can never be completely prepared’: How scientists spot the next pandemic,” Global News).


Order of Canada appointments

Congratulations! The Fellows listed below were each newly appointed to, or promoted within, the Order of Canada.

Read more about the recipients on the Governor General’s website.

COMPANIONS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

  • Roberta Lynn Bondar, CC, OOnt, MD, FRCPC

OFFICERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

  • Jane Green, OC, ONL, MD, FRCPC
  • Peter Henry St George-Hyslop, OC, MD, FRCPC

MEMBERS OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

  • Mohit Bhandari, CM, MD, FRCSC
  • John Conly, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • W. Dale Dauphinee, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Allan Steven Detsky, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Abraham Fuks, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Mitchell Halperin, CM, MDCM, FRCPC
  • K. Wayne Johnston, CM, MD, FRCSC
  • Bruce McManus, CM, MD, FRCPC
  • Bryce Taylor, CM, MD, FRCSC
  • James Patterson Waddell, CM, MD, FRCSC

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In memoriam

Stethoscope

Please note: hyperlinks open physician obituaries hosted on external websites.

Ruth Elizabeth Alison, MD, FRCPC, died on May 26, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 91. Dr. Alison was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1959. Read more about Dr. Alison.

Ted (Teodor) Bojanowski, MD, FRCSC, died on April 25, 2018, in Belcarra, B.C., at age 64. Dr. Bojanowski was certified by the Royal College in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery in 1987. Read more about Dr. Bojanowski.

E. D. (Doug) Crawshaw, MD, FRCSC, died on May 4, 2018, in Riverview, N.B., at age 80. Dr. Crawshaw was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1970. Read more about Dr. Crawshaw.

Robert Henry Cummings, MD, FRCPC, died on May 13, 2018, in Oshawa, Ont., at age 86. Dr. Cummings was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1964. Read more about Dr. Cummings.

Donald James Delahaye, MDCM, FRCPC, died on May 11, 2018, in Battersea, Ont., at age 91. Dr. Delahaye was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1955. Read more about Dr. Delahaye.

Robert Jackson Duke, MD, FRCPC, died on May 16, 2018, in Sturgeon Falls, Ont., at age 72. Dr. Duke was certified by the Royal College in Neurology in 1974. Read more about Dr. Duke.

Michael (Mike) Falla, MBChB, FRCSC, died on April 22, 2018, in Cambridge, Ont., at age 89. Dr. Falla was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1971. Read more about Dr. Falla.

John A. Hunt, MBBS, FRCPC, died on June 2, 2018, in West Vancouver, B.C., at age 91. Dr. Hunt was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1969. Read more about Dr. Hunt.

David R. Johns, MD, FRCSC, died on May 28, 2018, in Barrie, Ont., at age 78. Dr. Johns was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1971. Read more about Dr. Johns.

Garth Edward Johnson, MD, FRCSC, died on May 8, 2018, in Gloucester, Ont., at age 76. Dr. Johnson was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1971. Read more about Dr. Johnson.

Daniel Benjamin Konrad, MD, FRCSC, died on May 16, 2018, in Prince George, B.C., at age 87. Dr. Konrad was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1974. Read more about Dr. Konrad.

Stanley Robert Iwan, MD, FRCSC, died on April 2, 2018, in Guelph, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Iwan was certified by the Royal College in Neurosurgery in 1965. Read more about Dr. Iwan.

Lynn Francis W. Loach, MD, FRCPC, died on May 26, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 84. Dr. Francis was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1964. Read more about Dr. Loach.

Norman John Lush, MD, FRCPC, died on May 11, 2018, in St. John’s, N.L., at age 88. Dr. Lush was certified by the Royal College in Neurology in 1966. Read more about Dr. Lush.

Émile Marcotte, MD, FRCPC, died on April 9, 2018, in Montreal, Que., at age 86. Dr. Marcotte was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1963. Read more about Dr. Marcotte.

Gordon Mathieson, MBChB, FRCPC, died on May 17, 2018, in St. John’s, N.L., at age 91. Dr. Mathieson was certified by the Royal College in Neuropathology in 1968. Read more about Dr. Mathieson.

Maryse Mercier, MD, FRCPC, died on April 9, 2018, in Victoriaville, Que., at age 54. Dr. Mercier was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1990. Read more about Dr. Mercier.

William George (Bill) Mills, MD, FRCPC, died on May 10, 2018, in Navan, Ont., at age 71. Dr. Mills was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1979. Read more about Dr. Mills.

Richard Gerald Orlaw, MD, FRCPC, died on May 10, 2018, in Kelowna, B.C., at age 80. Dr. Orlaw was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1973. Read more about Dr. Orlaw.

Karen Elaine Pape, MD, FRCPC, died on June 2, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 73. Dr. Pape was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 1976. Read more about Dr. Pape.

Hirsch Rastogi, MBBS, FRCPC, died on May 27, 2018, in Ancaster, Ont., at age 80. Dr. Rastogi was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1966. Read more about Dr. Rastogi.

Irving Rother, MD, FRCPC, died on May 29, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 98. Dr. Rother was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1949. Read more about Dr. Rother.

Harry Leslie Rounthwaite, MDCM, FRCSC, died on May 3, 2018, in Sarnia, Ont., at age 94. Dr. Rounthwaite was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery in 1955. Read more about Dr. Rounthwaite.

Edward Anthony Sabga, MD, FRCSC, died on April 23, 2018, in Kingsville, Ont., at age 82. Dr. Sabga was certified by the Royal College in Obstetrics and Gynecology in 1968. Read more about Dr. Sabga.

Donald John Scott, MD, FRCPC, died on April 26, 2018, in Bridgewater, N.S., at age 82. Dr. Scott was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology in 1971. Read more about Dr. Scott.

Walter Maynard (Bud) Shaw, MDCM, FRCPC, died on April 27, 2018, in Oshawa, Ont., at age 94. Dr. Shaw was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine (1952) and Nuclear Medicine (1976). Read more about Dr. Shaw.

Maggie Shu, MD, FRCPC, died on May 20, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 49. Dr. Shu was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics in 2002. Read more about Dr. Shu.

Mark Anthony A. Solomon, MD, FRCPC, died on May 19, 2018, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 82. Dr. Solomon was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1983. Read more about Dr. Solomon.

John Staton Speakman, MD, FRCSC, died on May 13, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Speakman was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology in 1957. Read more about Dr. Speakman.

John Templeton, MBChB, FRCSC, died on April 30, 2018, in Stone, Staffordshire, UK, at age 80. Dr. Templeton was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery in 1970.

Jack Ven Tu, MD, FRCPC, died on May 30, 2018, in Toronto, Ont., at age 53. Dr. Tu was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine in 1992. Read more about Dr. Tu.

David Malcolm Lewis (Malcolm) Williams, MD, FRCSC, died on April 23, 2018, in Kingston, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Williams was certified by the Royal College in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery in 1969. Read more about Dr. Williams.

Irvin Isidor Wolkoff, MD, FRCPC, died on May 22, 2018, in Campbellcroft, Ont., at age 66. Dr. Wolkoff was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry in 1981. Read more about Dr. Wolkoff.

Shu Hyun Yoon, MD, FRCSC, died on May 30, 2018, in Dartmouth, N.S., at age 89. Dr. Yoon was certified by the Royal College in Urology in 1966. Read more about Dr. Yoon.


 

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