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Dialogue - 2017

MOC Tip of the Month
By Jo-Ann Talbot

Looking for bite-sized, engaging CPD? Learn with podcasts!

MOC Tip of the Month - By Dr. Jo-Ann Talbot

Did you know that you can claim MOC Program credits for listening to medical podcasts? I’m an Emergency Medicine (EM) physician and my discipline has really embraced the era of online learning in medical education. In recent years the FOAM (Free Open Access Medical Education) movement has generated an explosion of high-quality podcasts that I now follow for my continuing professional development (CPD):

Podcasts — small packages, big benefits

  • Podcasts present information in an auditory way that is engaging, bite-sized and digestible.
  • Podcasts are one of the most up-to-date information media, often prioritizing a discipline’s latest innovations and technologies.
  • Podcasts are portable — you can access them on-the-go from everywhere. The blogs that accompany many medical podcasts provide written summaries that interpret the evidence for you and provide context to enhance your learning.
  • The blog portion often contains references that I use as secondary sources to corroborate the information. They help me ensure I’m basing my understanding on evidence rather than an outlying opinion.
  • Lastly, the accompanying blog encourages comments, providing a forum for peer review, ongoing discussion and learning in-situ.

Two ways to use podcasts in your MOC

  1. Claim podcasts as a scanning activity under Section 2 for 0.5 credits per podcast.
  2. Take your podcast activity one step further and use it to jump-start a Personal Learning Project (PLP) for two credits per hour. I like to review the evidence and reference lists in the written summaries and use these resources as stimuli for additional learning through a PLP.

Here are some suggested podcasts to get you started

  • CMAJ podcasts: Interviews with authors and experts brought to you from the Canadian Medical Association
  • UpToDate Talk: Clinical podcasts
  • Surgery 101: A surgery podcast created by surgeons at the University of Alberta
  • Behind the Knife: A surgery podcast hosted by American surgeons

 

Email Jo-Ann

Contact your local CPD Educator

Fellow readers, do you have a MOC tip that you would like to share with others?

Call for MOC tips: Share "what works" for you
Big or small, we'd love to hear them all. Send us your tip!


 

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7 tips on eCommunications and social media use (via CMPA)

Technology is changing the way we communicate with colleagues and with patients

Technology is changing the way we communicate with colleagues and with patients. While eCommunications can improve patient care and enhance patients’ engagement in their care, it can also present unique challenges to patient privacy and confidentiality.

The Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) has published several tips and articles related to the medical-legal risks associated with using eCommunications. Remember, it is your responsibility to ensure that your patients’ information remains protected and secure.

Consider these 7 tips

  1. Always discuss the risks of eCommunications with your patients – even if you’re using a consent form (such as the CMPA’s eCommunications consent template [PDF, DOC])
  2. Think twice before sharing information via text, email or social media – even if you’re sharing it with a colleague.
  3. Ensure you have an objective for your communications and select the right platform.
  4. Verify protection requirements (i.e. email encryption) in your jurisdiction.
  5. Check with your jurisdiction to ensure virtual care is permitted and understand any billing limitations.
  6. Always document the assessment and/or encounter in the medical records.
  7. Recognize that sometimes speaking face-to-face might be the best option.

Link to more information on eCommunication and social media
Check out the CMPA Good Practices Guide (eCommunication and Social media) or the following articles on their website

This content has been shared on behalf of the CMPA. Please visit their website for more details. CMPA members are reminded that they can contact the association with questions or concerns by visiting www.cmpa-acpm.ca or calling 1-800-267-6522.


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Big Data is a big deal! Learn more at our special analytics summit this fall

Information technology has allowed us to collect amazing amounts of data about what we do every day, and how we go about our daily tasks

Guest post by Dr. Rodrigo Cavalcanti; republished from the ICRE blog.

We live in the age of Big Data. Information technology has allowed us to collect amazing amounts of data about what we do every day, and how we go about our daily tasks. For example, consider how Google can predict the words you are likely to type next when you search online; or, how your favourite online store knows exactly what to recommend for your next purchase. Analyzing this data can provide powerful insights.

In education, we are just beginning to understand how to use data to enhance the way students learn. Currently, the amount of available sources of information on how trainees learn is unprecedented. As data from learners’ performance increases exponentially, modern IT tools provide solutions for combining and presenting this data for the benefit of learners and supervisors.

But can information gleaned from these sources truly help trainees accelerate their growth in a discipline? The promise of analytics is that the compilation and presentation of data back to trainees can indeed promote learning.

Educational data mining can be overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. Join us at the 2017 International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) in beautiful Quebec City for the Learning Analytics Summit: Demystifying the Use of Big Data in Medical Education.

Together with an international panel of experts, participants will have the opportunity to help build a community of scholars from the ground up that will debate the pertinent issues and establish an agenda for future development.

We are pleased to include the following panelists on the program: Dr. Rodrigo Cavalcanti (University of Toronto); Dr. Jason Frank (Royal College); Dr. Stan Hamstra (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education); Dr. Karen Hauer (University of California); Dr. Martin Pusic (New York University School of Medicine); Dr. Tim Shaw (University of Sydney); Dr. Brent Thoma (University of Saskatchewan); Dr. Amol Verma (University of Toronto); and Dr. Eric Warm (University of Cincinnati).

Visit the ICRE website to learn more about this exciting two-day pre-conference event.

Dr. Rodrigo Cavalcanti, MD, MSc, FRCPC, is an associate professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto, where he is director for the General Internal Medicine Training Program. He is also a CanMEDS Clinician Educator at the Royal College. Since 2010, he has been a member of the planning board for the International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE) and is currently chair of this year’s Learning Analytics Summit.


ICRE 2017 registration opens in April: Online registration for this year's conference in Quebec City will open the week of April 3, 2017. Keep an eye on the ICRE website for program details, speaker announcements and more. www.royalcollege.ca/icre

Reminder: Residency education award nominations are due on April 7


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Competence by Design launches in 4 months. Read the latest update.

Competence by Design launches in 4 months. Read the latest update.

Every few months, we release CBD Community Touchpoint — a special newsletter about our work preparing for the July 1 launch of Competence by Design (CBD) Cohort 1. The latest issue was just released. Check it out for all your CBD news:

www.royalcollege.ca/rcsite/publications/cbd-community-touchpoint-e

What's in this issue?

  • Working together to implement CBD: Dr. Padmos outlines the final steps required between now and July 1 to ensure a successful launch of CBD.
  • Medical Oncology field test yields encouraging results: Learn the results, plus how they are helping us improve our work with stakeholders on implementation.
  • CBD Readiness Checklist: See a high-level graphic that maps out the activities that will “checked off” over the next four months by each stakeholder group.
  • The role of stakeholder engagement: Take a look at our key engagement activities from January to March of this year.
  • Learn more about FacDev resources to support CBD implementation: Learn how we’re working with key stakeholders to create educational and faculty development resources to support disciplines as they incorporate competency-based medical education into their programs.
  • Have questions about Accreditation Reform? This resource is for you: Check out "Your Guide to Accreditation Reform" for more information on what CanRAC is, what the proposed changes are, and an overview of the 10 reforms.

For more on CBD, visit www.royalcollege.ca/cbd or email cbd@royalcollege.ca.


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You might be surprised to learn all the things we did

High-level snapshot of our most notable achievements from the past year

For future generations (our 2016 Annual Review) is now available for viewing and downloading from our website. This vibrant document provides a high-level snapshot of our most notable achievements from the past year.

Check out our short teaser video to learn more. Then, download your copy (or request a print copy from our communications team). Visit www.royalcollege.ca/annualreview


A note on our theme

For future generations” is an outlook most commonly associated with the physical environment, but one we think is quite appropriate for other legacy work – such as our collaborative efforts in the health care and medical education communities. It’s about sustainability. It’s about quality. It’s about safety. It’s about progress. It’s about vision — and we have an ambitious one: “The best health for all. The best care for all.” There’s no question that we must look ahead, if we’re going to improve systems of care and appropriately train specialists to treat growing patient complexities and meet changing expectations of the profession. Some small steps, some giant leaps; but everything links back to this goal. – Dr. Andrew Padmos and Dr. Kevin Imrie


More year-end updates


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News from your Royal College Council

News from your Royal College Council

To keep you up-to-date on the composition and discussions of Council, we’re pleased to share with you some highlights from the February 23-24, 2017, Council meeting and the Annual Meeting of the Members (AMM) that immediately followed.

Council membership

Council retirements
The terms of eight Councillors ended on Friday, February 24, 2017.

  • Dr. Christopher O’Brien, FRCPC (Region 3)
  • Dr. Katharine Gillis, FRCPC (Region 3)
  • Dr. Marie-Hélène Leblanc, FRCPC (Region 4)
  • Dr. Louise Côté, FRCPC (Region 4)
  • Dr. Vivian McAlister, FRCSC (Region 3)
  • Dr. Robert Sabbagh, FRCSC (Region 4)
  • Ms. Chantal Bernier, LL.M (Public member)
  • Dr. Jasmine Hasselback, MD (Resident member)

Council recognized retiring Councillors’ dedication to fulfilling the Royal College’s vision and mission, including their contributions to

  • the strategic plan The goal that matters most (2012-2015; 2015-2018),
  • CanMEDS 2015,
  • Competence by Design,
  • Royal College International (RCI) and increased international outreach,
  • advocacy work in relation to early brain and biological development and early, learning, and Indigenous health.

Start of new Council member terms
Ten elected member positions on Council were filled through the bi-annual election process that culminated at the AMM. Three members of Council were elected by the members for a second term and six were elected for a first term.

The election process officially began in October 2016 when the Nominating Committee (NC) met to formulate its slate of nominations to fill division- and region-specific positions on Council for the 2017-2021 term.

The nominations of the NC were presented to the members on December 1, 2016, and members were invited to submit additional nominations until January 11, 2017. No additional nominations were received and the individuals who were nominated by the NC were officially elected by acclamation at the AMM.

Council also appointed five public members, two Fellows-at-large and one Resident member.

Appointment of the President
Council also appointed the new Royal College President. Françoise Chagnon, MDCM, FRCSC, completed her one-year term as President-Elect and was formally appointed by Council as President of the Royal College for the 2017-2019 term. Dr. Chagnon officially took office at the conclusion of the AMM on February 24, 2017. Dr. Chagnon succeeds Kevin Imrie, MD, FRCPC, who was formally appointed as Immediate Past-President for a one-year term.

Strategic thinking and planning

Strategic planning session
The Royal College’s current strategic plan, The goal that matters most, is in effect from April 1, 2015, to March 31, 2018. So, the time has come to start defining the Royal College’s next strategic plan that will be effective from April 1, 2018, to March 31, 2021. A strategic planning approach that will span the next 12 to 16 months and the membership of a Strategic Planning Working Group of Council (SPWGC) were approved at the meeting.

To kick-start the strategic planning process, Council broke out into small groups to reflect on the vision, mission, values and statement of purpose of the Royal College. There was general consensus among the groups of the need to ensure the statements clearly convey to stakeholders the space occupied by the Royal College in the health and medical education systems. Members of Council noted that, as currently framed, the vision and mission may be too generic to clearly set the Royal College apart from other organizations. Council will be extending its next meeting in June 2017 by a half-day to continue its strategic planning discussions.

Royal College distinguished lecture: Precision medicine
Alan Bernstein, OC, BSc, PhD, FRSC, President and CEO of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) delivered the February 2017 Royal College Council Distinguished Lecture. The title of his address was “Precision/Personalized Medicine: Challenges & Opportunities for Canada.” Dr. Bernstein illustrated for Council, through a series of examples, how precision medicine has and will continue to profoundly revolutionize the practice of medicine and at an increasingly accelerated pace.

In the discussion that followed, two main take away points emerged. One, deep learning / technological advancements will change physicians’ scopes of practice and training needs, and notably in a direction that will enable physicians to embrace the more compassionate side of health care. Secondly, the value of clinician scientists to the future of health care was brought to the forefront and Council agreed to hold a focused discussion at a future meeting on the importance of developing and supporting career paths for the clinician scientist.

Ongoing oversight and direction

Council provided oversight and direction with regards to several strategic priority initiatives, organizational policies and financial matters. Council discussions centred on several items:

  • Approval of the annual operating, capital and pension plan budgets
  • Advancement of the Competence by Design (CBD) initiative and stakeholder implementation issues
  • Development of new cases for the Royal College’s bioethics curriculum for residents and Fellows relevant to medical assistance in dying
  • The collaborative efforts of the Royal College’s Indigenous Health Advisory Committee (IHAC) in addressing cultural safety for Indigenous Peoples
  • Approval of a statement of principles on safe opioid prescribing to help guide the Royal College’s response to Canada’s “opioid crisis”
  • The Royal College’s two streams of international activities: international development and cost-recovery

The next Royal College Council meeting will take place June 21-23, 2017, in Ottawa. Questions relating to Council activities can be directed to governance@royalcollege.ca


 

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Meet your new President (only the 2nd woman to ever hold this title)

Dr. Françoise P. Chagnon

Dr. Françoise P. Chagnon, MDCM, FRCSC, has accomplished a lot her career: a voice specialist to professional artists, businesswoman for an international family business and hosting presentations at McGill’s Schulich School of Music. Now, she has another title to add to her résumé: 44th President of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Read Dr. Chagnon’s full biography »

Effective February 24, 2017, the McGill-educated otolaryngologist took over the Royal College presidency. She succeeds Kevin Imrie, MD, FRCPC, a Toronto hematologist and award-winning educator who served in this role from 2015-2017.

The main focus of her two-year mandate is to promote Fellows’ engagement with the Royal College.

“I want to grow this profession through mentorship, ensuring all specialists have our support at every stage in their career,” she said. “By bettering ourselves, we’re giving our patients the best care every day.”

Dr. Charles Bernard, President and Chief Executive Director of the Collège des médecins du Québec, added his strong words of support saying, “Dr. Chagnon has a good understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of today’s medical practice. She will advocate for every physician specialist’s interests, including those of specialists in Quebec.”

Dr. Chagnon has been involved with the Royal College for many years before her appointment as President. She recently managed the Financial Reporting and Risk Oversight Committee, where she introduced best practices for Fellows on billing and financial ethics.

“Dr. Chagnon has incredible experience as a specialist and is highly respected in her current and past leadership roles,” said Royal College CEO Andrew Padmos, MD, FRCPC. “She’ll bring new perspective and skills to this role. We are proud to welcome her as our new President.”


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On foldaway bikes, reaching consensus and leadership style: Council members reflect on immediate Past-President, Dr. Kevin Imrie

Dr. Kevin Imrie

Kevin Imrie, MD, FRCPC, has officially ended his term as Royal College President. He leaves behind an incredible legacy marked in large part by his welcoming nature.

“I would have to say that Dr. Imrie’s leadership style was one of inclusion. I think that he went out of his way to demonstrate that all members of the Royal College are important,” said Brian Clapson, MD, FRCSC. “I know that from the Council meetings, he would endeavor to include all of the Council, staff and visitors in the meetings. You could always count on him to say hello to you. His time as President obviously was met with his passion as a leader,” he added.

Dr. Imrie served as Royal College President from 2015 to 2017, a timeline that aligned with the unveiling of the Royal College’s latest strategic plan (The goal that matters most) and momentum-build on several major initiatives and portfolios, notably Competence by Design (CBD).

“Kevin has been able to lead the Royal College during this time of transition with the Competence by Design initiative and has done a terrific job of listening to the concerns of Fellows, as well as the medical educators and leaders,” said Jim Wilson, MD, FRCSC. “Even when discussions got tense and controversial, he could somehow stay upbeat and bring about a consensus when none appeared to be possible at the outset of the discussion. He could do that seemingly effortlessly to boot!”

Bill Pope, MD, FRCPC, had a similar comment: “As President, he presided over several crucial issues including a significant part of CBD, the formalization of our Indigenous programs, support for Royal College International at a crucial time in its development, to name only a few. I realize that he has not achieved this alone, but that is his skill – to bring all the necessary players to the table and achieve a result.”

Apart from his leadership skills, Dr. Imrie was well-known for his commitment to a healthy lifestyle – which sometimes dovetailed with his economical sensibilities.

“I will always remember Kevin arriving at Echo Drive riding his foldaway bicycle — as always, on the lookout to save a few dollars on taxi fare,” recalls Dr. Wilson.

Newly-appointed President, Françoise Chagnon, MDCM, FRCSC, added, “Dr. Imrie encouraged the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle, although few of us are likely to achieve his level of athletic performance as a runner!” (Fun fact: Dr. Imrie qualified and ran in last year’s Boston Marathon).

Dr. Imrie completes his term as President at a time of heightened activity — a lot of it the progression of work begun under his direction. This includes the launch of Competence by Design on July 1, the kick-off of the CanMEDS Consortium, diversifying health policy and advocacy portfolios, a new strategic planning process and expanding international work.

In fact, several Council members specifically credited Dr. Imrie with strengthening the reputation of the Royal College.

“Dr. Imrie chaired Council with skills and grace, and assured that councillors never forgot their duty as stewards of the Royal College. He was skilled at conveying the vision and the mission of the Royal College wherever he went, thus strengthening our relations and friendships, including with our international partners,” said Dr. Chagnon.

Vivian McAlister, MD, FRCSC, added, “Dr. Imrie extended the good reputation of the Royal College beyond our borders by his insightful contributions to initiatives and reviews undertaken by our sister colleges.”

Thankfully, Dr. Imrie won’t be going too far. As immediate Past-President, he’ll be contributing to the work of the Royal College in a heightened way for at least another year.

“I’ll always remember my first conversation with Dr. Imrie. I had a conflict for my first Council meeting. His response was cordial and reassuring; but at the same time, he made sure I was going to benefit from the orientation session I could attend and be ready for my Council responsibilities. That was classic Imrie: friendly, welcoming and yet clear on the path to take,” said Robert La Roche, MD, FRCSC.


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Call for applications: Enhancing primary care access to specialist consult

Call for applications: Enhancing primary care access to specialist consult

The issue of long wait times for specialist care is one of the most significant problems facing health care in Canada.

To help address this issue, the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) is inviting health care delivery organizations to participate in Connected Medicine — a 15-month quality improvement collaborative focused on implementing remote consult services.

The Connected Medicine collaborative is a partnership between CFHI, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canada Health Infoway and the Royal College. Its goal is to support health care delivery organizations to test, implement and scale remote consult services, and ultimately improve provider-to-provider communication and access to care.

Select key dates

  • March 7, 2017: Call for applications (expression of commitment) launch
  • March – April 2017: Pre-application coaching calls
  • May 4, 2017: Application (expression of commitment) deadline
  • May 2017: Applications (expression of commitment) reviewed and teams selected
  • May 31, 2017: Deadline for signing the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

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Announcing our 2017 theme (+ your chance to be part of the program) #SimSummit

Announcing our 2017 theme

We’re thrilled to announce that the theme for this year’s Simulation Summit is “Simulation for Health Systems, Care and Quality.” We look forward to offering conference participants valuable programming that highlights the ways that research and innovations in medical simulation can impact systems-level quality-enhancement.

Want to be part of the program? Submit an abstract or workshop proposal
Content submissions for the Simulation Summit begin closing next month. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to present your research or to lead a workshop.

  • Call for workshop proposals (Deadline: April 17, 2017)
    Proposals related to simulation-based learning from a variety of contexts, settings and perspectives, will be considered. Workshop objectives should enable participants to develop skills and knowledge in a particular area of simulation education. Link to submission form and instructions for workshop proposals »
  • Call for abstracts (Deadline: May 15, 2017)
    Proposals should present rigorous scholarly work, and advance knowledge of simulation-based education and assessment, broadly. Abstracts must fall under one of two categories: research or innovation. Note: Researchers with less than five years of experience may be considered for a special “Emerging Investigator Presentation” showcase. Link to submission form and instructions for abstracts »

About the Simulation Summit
The Simulation Summit is an inter-professional conference that brings together simulation educators, researchers and a wide-range of other health care workers to explore cutting-edge simulation research, learning and practice. Our 2017 event will be held in Montreal, Canada, from November 1-2.

www.royalcollege.ca/simulationsummit | @RC_SimSummit | simsummit@royalcollege.ca


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Members in the news

Doctor walking down a hospital hallway

“Raising the issue, acknowledging this is an issue, and having a discussion about it is helpful and will help with outcomes,”- Lisa Barbera, MD, FRCPC. (“Cancer agency encourages making sexual health a routine part of care,” National Post)

Alain Beaudet, FRCPSC, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), announced his retirement from the public service and CIHR, effective at the end of March 2017. Read the full announcement.

“There are subgroups (of men) where the response rate is almost a 50-50 shot,” – Gerald Brock, MD, FRCSC. (“Botox could be ‘game changer’ for erectile dysfunction, Canadian urologists say,” Ottawa Citizen; Dr. Sidney Radomski, FRCSC, was also quoted)

“I think the main difference today would be that athletes have greater awareness; they recognize symptoms of a concussion,” J. Scott Delaney, MDCM, FRCSC. (“Concussions pose silent risks to university and pro athletes,” University Affairs)

"That's the one we've worried about for years. … If that were something that were to get going it would be very frightening," – Michael Gardam, MD, FRCPC. (“WHO's 'priority pathogens' list highlights urgent need for new drugs,” CBC News)

"We're not only reducing the disability, we're reducing the mortality from these big strokes by about 50 per cent. So this is another big leap," – Michael Hill, MD, FRCPC. (“New emergency brain procedure saving stroke patients,” CBC News)

Nadia Khan, MD, FRCPC, a Vancouver-based general internist and scientist, was named the president of Hypertension Canada. Read the full announcement.

Nir Lipsman, MD, FRCSC, is the lead author of “Deep brain stimulation of the subcallosal cingulate for treatment-refractory anorexia nervosa: 1 year follow-up of an open-label trial,” which was published in The Lancet Psychiatry.

"This is another article that makes us think again about how many people are on these medications, and how many are on them unnecessarily," – Emily McDonald, MD, FRCPC. (“Popular heartburn drugs could lead to kidney damage without warning: study,” CBC News)

“We’re starting to see evidence that prevention works: there’s a slowing in the increase in number of new dementias in developed countries, which is attributed to higher levels of education, lower smoking rates, improved diets, and better treatments for diabetes and heart disease,”- Drs. Benoit Mulsant and Tarek Rajji, FRCPC. (Co-authors of “Doctors’ Notes: Toronto researchers turn to high-tech help to prevent dementia,” Toronto Star)

“I encourage black women in their 40s who are concerned about their risk of getting breast cancer at a younger age, to have that discussion,” - Onye Nnorom, MD, FRCPC. (Author of “Doctors' Notes: Black women should be aware of higher breast cancer risk,” Toronto Star)

“Raising the minimum legal age for access to tobacco is a scientifically proven, legally and politically quick, cheap and effective way to deprive the tobacco industry of recruiting a new generation of young people as their customers,” - John Oyston, MBBS, FRCPC (“Doctors should take more active role in preventing kids, teens from smoking: task force,” Toronto Star)

“Distress, depression, changes in sleep patterns, appetite, energy, focus, concentration. All of those symptoms could very easily be a part of a person’s response to very disturbing material,” - Scott Patten, MD, FRCPC. (“‘One of the burdens of being a juror is the isolation you have’: Juror with PTSD urges others to get help”, Ottawa Citizen)

“It’s very sobering as an ID (infectious disease) specialist to get a culture report showing resistance to all reported antibiotics,” - Lynora Saxinger, MD, FRCPC. (“Superbug immune to virtually every known antibiotic kills U.S. woman,” National Post)

Joanne Todesco, MD, FRCPC, was recently published in the Fall/Winter 2016 edition of Canadian Arbitration and Mediation with her paper titled, “Arbitration of Canadian Medical Malpractice Disputes.”

“I think it's fair to say that our prescribing in general has contributed to or might even be the genesis of this whole opioid epidemic that we're in,” Hakique Virani, MD, FRCPC. (“Improve opioid prescribing rules, training to curb fentanyl deaths, say advocates,” CBC News)


 

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In memoriam

Stethoscope

David John Addison, MBChB, FRCSC, died on December 8, 2016, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 76. Dr. Addition was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology. Read more about Dr. Addison.

Maria Arstikaitis, MD, FRCSC, died on October 28, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 93. Dr. Arstikaitis was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology. Read more about Dr. Arstikaitis.

Graham Berman, MBChB, FRCPC, died on November 12, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 81. Dr. Berman was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Berman.

George Irwin Bernstein, MD, FRCSC, died on October 10, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 87. Dr. Bernstein was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery. Read more about Dr. Bernstein.

Lorna Boag, MBChB, FRCPC, died on November 30, 2016, in Kingston, Ont., at age 91. Dr. Boag was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Boag.

Murray Boles, MD, FRCPC, died on October 5, 2016, in Southfield, Michigan, at age 88. Dr. Boles was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology and Therapeutic Radiology. Read more about Dr. Boles.

Garth Andrew Bruce, MD, FRCPC, died on November 30, 2016, in Saskatoon, Sask., at age 71. Dr. Bruce was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics. Read more about Dr. Bruce.

Philip David Chubb, MD, FRCSC, died on November 29, 2016, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 76. Dr. Chubb was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology. Read more about Dr. Chubb.

Bryan Cruickshanks, MD, FRCSC, died on December 17, 2016, in Aurora, Ont., at age 81. Dr. Cruickshanks was certified by the Royal College in Ophthalmology. Read more about Dr. Cruisckshanks.

Jean-Paul Dechêne, MD, FRCPC, died on December 18, 2016, in Gatineau, Que., at age 93. Dr. Dechêne was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology. Read more about Dr. Dechêne.

Jack Morris Freiman, MD, FRCPC, died on November 3, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 69. Dr. Freiman was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine. Read more about Dr. Freiman.

Ross Gale Gillman, MD, FRCSC, died on December 1, 2016, in London, Ont., at age 82. Dr. Gillman was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery. Read more about Dr. Gillman.

Elliot Goldner, MD, FRCPC, died on November 27, 2016, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 63. Dr. Goldner was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Goldner.

Fernando Gonzalez-Pino, MD, FRCPC, died on November 10, 2016, in Winnipeg, Man., at age 62. Dr. Gonzalez-Pino was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Gonzalez-Pino.

Donald William Groot, MD, FRCPC, died on December 11, 2016, in Edmonton, Alta., at age 67. Dr. Groot was certified by the Royal College in Dermatology. Read more about Dr. Groot.

Harold Jay Grossman, MD, FRCSC, died on November 15, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 94. Dr. Grossman was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery. Read more about Dr. Grossman.

Stanley Hashimoto, MD, FRCPC, died on December 3, 2016, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 78. Dr. Hashimoto was certified by the Royal College in Neurology. Read more about Dr. Hashimoto.

Helmut Huebert, MD, FRCSC, died on November 21, 2016, in Winnipeg, Man., at age 81. Dr. Huebert was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery. Read more about Dr. Huebert.

Paul Lefebvre, MD, FRCPC, died on November 28, 2016, in Lachine, Que., at age 91. Dr. Lefebvre was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Lefebvre.

Donald Frederick Louie, MD, FRCPC, died on November 25, 2016, in Vancouver, B.C., at age 71. Dr. Louie was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Louie.

Aaron Malkin, MD, FRCPC, died on November 6, 2016, in Israel, at age 90. Dr. Malkin was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine. Read more about Dr. Malkin.

Gilles Marion, MDCM, FRCPC, died on December 9, 2016, in Ottawa, Ont., at age 91. Dr. Marion was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics. Read more about Dr. Marion.

Joseph Thomas Marotta, MD, FRCPC, died on December 20, 2016, in London, Ont., at age 90. Dr. Marotta was certified by the Royal College in Neurology. Read more about Dr. Marotta.

Alvin Hubert McKenzie, MD, FRCSC, died on November 20, 2016, in Sturgeon County, at age 90. Dr. McKenzie was certified by the Royal College in Orthopedic Surgery. Read more about Dr. McKenzie.

Alexander “Eric” W. Morton, MBChB, FRCPC, died on December 28, 2016, in Peterborough, Ont., at age 89. Dr. Morton was certified by the Royal College in Diagnostic Radiology. Read more about Dr. Morton.

John Preston Murphy, MD, FRCPC, died on December 6, 2016, in Sarnia, Ont., at age 85. Dr. Murphy was certified by the Royal College in Internal Medicine. Read more about Dr. Murphy.

David Douglas Myran, MD, FRCPC, died on November 21, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 67. Dr. Myran was certified by the Royal College in Psychiatry. Read more about Dr. Myran.

Paul-Emile Raymond, MD, FRCPC, died on October 15, 2016, in Levis, Que., at age 77. Dr. Raymond was certified by the Royal College in Therapeutic Radiology. Read more about Dr. Raymond.

Gideon Rossouw, MBChB, FRCPC, died on November 19, 2016, in London, Ont., at age 86. Dr. Rossouw was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology. Read more about Dr. Rossouw.

Michael Arthur Scarff, MD, FRCPC, died on December 26, 2016, in Mississauga, Ont., at age 82. Dr. Scarff was certified by the Royal College in General Pathology. Read more about Dr. Scarff.

Alan Gerald Smith, MD, FRCSC, died on September 10, 2016, in Camorse, Alta., at age 79. Dr. Smith was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery. Read more about Dr. Smith.

James Howard Snider, MD, FRCSC, died on November 7, 2016, in Cambridge, Ont., at age 80. Dr. Snider was certified by the Royal College in General Surgery. Read more about Dr. Snider.

Donald A. Stewart, MD, FRCPC, died on November 23, 2016, in Toronto, Ont., at age 97. Dr. Stewart was certified by the Royal College in Pediatrics. Read more about Dr. Stewart.

Hugues Turnier, MD, FRCPC, died on November 23, 2016, in Montreal, Que., at age 96. Dr. Turnier was certified by the Royal College in Anesthesiology. Read more about Dr. Turnier.

William Winistok, MD, FRCSC, died on December 22, 2016, in Brandon, Man., at age 74. Dr. Winistok was certified by the Royal College in Urology. Read more about Dr. Winistok.


 

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